Category Archives: Common

1922 : Mitcham Common Aerodrome plan dropped

From the Shields Daily News – Friday 22nd December 1922, via the British Newspaper Archive

AIR TERMINUS PLAN DROPPED.
TOO EXPENSIVE: £1,000,000 INVOLVED.

It is understood that the Air Ministry has now abandoned definitely the scheme to replace Croydon aerodrome as the London Air terminus by another and more central site.

After searching the surroundings of London the only credible alternative has been found to be Mitcham Common. The local authorities here, however, would definitely oppose any scheme to turn this Into an aerodrome. It would necessitate diverting the Croydon Corporation tramways, which connect with Tooting by way of the common, and would also necessitate the removal of Tooting Bec golf course, which is one the wealthiest and most popular courses in South London.

COMPENSATION DEMAND.

A new site would have to found for the club and Mitcham residents would require a corresponding piece of common land that which they would asked to vacate. Moreover, Mitcham Common is in the river fog area, which Croydon just escapes. It would cost the Air Ministry about £1,000,000 with the compensation money and the money they would have to spend in equipping Mitcham as an aerodrome, building sheds, cleaning and levelling, and installing lights, etc. For a quarter of that sum the present Croydon terminal could be made the finest aerodrome in the world, and the only advantage of Mitcham would be the saving of fifteen minutes car journey between the heart of London and the aerodrome.

SPEEDING-UP PLAN

As the air journey saves several hours to passengers coming from the Central European towns, this is merely a negligible saving.

If it is found necessary, however, to save these minutes, the terminus can move after March 30 next to the Aircraft Disposal Co.’s site on the Waddon side of the aerodrome, where there is already a railway siding.

By arrangement with the railway company electric trains could run on to the aerodrome from Victoria in 20 minutes.

This is the only possible solution of the problem, and the Air Ministry will almost certainly adopt it.

Note that the Tooting Bec golf club had previously been on the land that became the Links Estate.

1890 : Church denied share of profits from Mitcham Common gravel extraction

From the Huddersfield Daily Chronicle – Thursday 17th July 1890

A CURIOUS CASE.

Mr. Justice Kekewich, on Wednesday, decided a curious case raised by the Ecclesiastical Commissioner, who, in 1862, were made lords of the manor of Vauxhall, who now brought an action against the devisees of James Bridger, lord of the manor of Biggin and Tamworth. and also the lords of the manor of Mitcham and Ravensbury, to recover one-fourth of the profits derived by the defendants from the gravel digging on Mitcham Common. The Ecclesiastical Commissioners contended that they were successors of the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury. the title being traced back to the reign of Edward I., who granted the manor to the Black Prince, who transferred it to the convent of Christ Church, Canterbury, and on the dissolution of the monasteries it was vested in the Crown in the reign of Henry VIII. The plaintiffs urged that the manor extended to Mitcham Common, which belonged to them and the other lords of the manor as tenants in common, and that, therefore, they were entitled to take their share of the gravel. His lordship gave judgment against the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, with costs, holding that they had failed to make out their case.