Tag Archives: 1953

Cedars Avenue

Road that runs south westerly from Tamworth Lane to Commonside East where it crosses Mitcham Common to Croydon Road near the junction with Carshalton Road. The part of the road across the Common was a footpath until it was widened in 1930/31.

From the minutes of the Mitcham Urban District council
Volume XVI May 1930 to April 1931
Highways Committee
4th June 1930
Page 115

IMPROVEMENTS.

I lay before you plans for the construction of a new road from Watneys Road to Galpins Road at an estimated cost of £3,880.

I also lay before you plans for the widening and reoonstruction of New Road from the common from Blue House Bridge to Cedars Road, at an intimated cost of £5,391.

In both cases it is proposed to maintain a footway on one side only, and in the case of the first mentioned road the width of the carriageway is 18 ft., and in the latter instance 24 ft. with 5 ft. footpath.

Yours obediently,
Riley Schofield, Assoc.M.Inst.C.E.,
Engineer and Surveyor.

Resolved –

(f) Improvements, Mitcham Common – That the Committee defer consideration of the plans for construction of a new road from Watneys Road to Galpins Road and for the widening and reconstruction of New Road across the Common from Blue Houses Bridge to Cedars Road, pending the decision of the Conservators with regard to the promotion of a Bill in Parliament.

This OS map from 1910 shows the route of road and footpath to the Blue House pub:

1910 OS map

It also shows two large houses off the east side of the road, and opposite the drive that led to Brenley. The names of these can be seen on this 1953 OS map, as The Chantry and Radstock.

1953 OS map

In the 1964 electoral register, the houses in Cedars Avenue were listed as:

No. 1,3 and 5
Brenley
Newholme
Orchard Cottage
Malvern
Devonia
Havrincourt
The Cedars
Radstock
The Chantry
The Orchard
Malgarry
Clonmel

Rear garden of The Orchard. Photo kindly supplied by a former resident.

Cedars Avenue looking towards Commonside East. Havrincourt is on the left. Photo kindly supplied by a former resident of The Orchard.

The houses on the east side of the road were renumbered even, starting from the Commonside East end, possibly in the 1930s. The 1939 for sale ad below for Devonia was the same as an ad listed for no. 2.

Road being surfaced in the 1960s. See comment below by Alan Hutchings.

News articles and adverts

Norwood News – Friday 14 April 1939

MITCHAM COMMON (partially overlooking).

Bright semi-detached freehold; vacant possession; 2 receptions, 3 bedrooms, kitchen, separate w.c., nice garden; £745. – Apply on premises, “Devonia”, Cedars-avenue, Mitcham; Mitcham 4130.

Norwood News – Saturday 13 November 1926
Image © Reach PLC. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

Text of ad:

MITCHAM
(Immediately facing Common and Golf Links).
(By tram alight at Blue House).
Substantially Built Brick and Tile
FREEHOLD HOUSES.
3 and 4 bedrooms. Every modern convenience.
Room for Garage.
£975 to £1,200.
LIBERAL MORTGAGE ARRANGED.
Apply, any time, any day, to:-
PYLE, Contractor,
Corner of Cedars Avenue and Commonside East,
MITCHAM, Surrey.


Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Mitcham Rubber Company

Rubber factory that was on the south side of Morden Road, as shown in this 1953 OS map.

1953 OS map

1947 aerial photo, looking south, from Britain From Above

The business moved from Mitcham in 1963 and the factory site is now a trading estate.

According to a comment on the Mitcham History Group on Facebook:

it was a big local employer in the 1950s and called workers back to work with an air raid siren.

Also from Facebook, the Leyland Historical Society, in requesting any local knowledge of the Mitcham Rubber Company, said:

Mitcham Rubber Company started in 1916 as a subsidiary of the Leyland & Birmingham Rubber Company, part of the firm that produced latex products before being transferred up to Leyland in 1963

Before 1916, the site was used by W.T. Bigsby varnish manufacturers.

News Articles

Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer – Saturday 9th September 1916

LEYLAND AND BIRMINGHAM RUBBER COMPANY

Presiding at the annual meeting of Leyland and Birmingham Rubber Company, at Leyland, yesterday. Mr. Robert T. Byrne said the past year’s profits were £67,239 after providing for excess profit tax, and £27,311 was brought forward. A final dividend on the Ordinary Shares of 10 per cent, was proposed, making 15 per cent, for the twelve months, and carrying forward £25,429. They recieved notice from the Government that from September 1 the works at Leyland and Mayhill, Glasgow, would be controlled under the Munitions of War Act. If they were not controlled many workmen of military age would be taken from them, but they will not now stand such risk. The directors had taken over the Mitcham Rubber Company with a view of capturing a special class of trade which was almost entirely done before the war in England, France, and Russia by the German and Austrian manufacturers. The report was adopted, and Mr. J. T. Goodie was re-elected director.

Birmingham Daily Post – Thursday 19th September 1918

PURCHASE OF THE MITCHAM RUBBER COMPANY.

They would remember that extraordinary general meeting of the shareholders of the Mitcham Rubber Company was held on June 19 consider the advisability of purchasing the balance of shares in the Mitcham Rubber Company, and letter setting out firstly the reasons for doing so accompanied the notice calling that meeting. The shareholders present at that meeting unanimously decided to purchase the balance of shares, so that the Mitcham Rubber Company was now the absolute property of this company. He proceeded to speak of the branches home and abroad. The home branches – namely, London, Birmingham, Cardiff, Manchester, Glasgow, and Edinburgh, and the Palatine Heel Company — had again, he was pleased to say, done exceedingly well; the result of the trading the Mary Hill Works, Glasgow, had been highly satisfactory, and reflected great credit on the management there. The results of the branches abroad — Johannesburg, Calcutta, and Buenos Ayres — were satisfactory, notwithstanding the great difficulties which had contended with in the way of freight, and especially regard providing their branches with the necessary stocks — their works, as they must be aware, having been mainly employed in turning out requirements for the Government,

Birmingham Daily Post – Thursday 26th September 1963

Leyland Rubber – a recovery Leyland and Birmingham Rubber reports a gentle recovery from last winter’s recession in Britain, and “for the moment there seems to be good reason to expect It to continue/” That, and the continued development of the South African company, and the transfer of Mitcham Rubber’s production to Leyland seem to augur well for 1963/4.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.