Tag Archives: 1935

Mitcham Stadium

Sports stadium, which occupied around 8 acres, north of Eastfields Road and opposite the football ground in Sandy Lane, was built in 1935 and was sold to property developer Wates Ltd in 1955.

1952 OS map

1953 aerial photo showing football and rugby posts on the field. Fernlea Road is on the left, with Sandy lane at the top.

Mitcham Borough council minutes of 6th December 1934, volume 1, page 89, record a letter received from Mr S.E. Parkes:

26. LAND, EASTFIELDS.

Read letter from Mr. S. E. Parkes stating that he had had under consideration a scheme for the
utilisation of the disused gravel pit in Eastfields Road for the purpose of a Rugby football ground, and asking whether any objection would be raised by the Council in connection with
the user of this land for the purpose under the provisions of the Town Planning Scheme.

Resolved, That Mr. Parkes be informed that no objection will be offered by the Council.

A detailed history of the stadium can be found at the Gandermonium blog.

Mitcham News & Mercury, 18th May, 1935

Norwood News, 6th September 1935, showing construction of one of the two stands. 300 tons of steel was used in each stand, and by comparison, the Majestic cinema had 350 tons.

Norwood News, 6th September 1935 advertising the opening of the stadium the next day.

In addition to rugby, Irish games such as hurling were played at the stadium.

In 1954, the stadium was called ‘A White Elephant’ in this article in the 1st July issue of the Mitcham & Tooting Advertiser:

The site was sold to Wates Ltd who built housing with Guyatt Gardens, Ormerod Gardens, Fowler Road, Priestley Road with Roper Way connecting to Eastfields Road.

Mitcham and Tooting Advertiser, 26th May 1955, page 1.

House for sale ad in 1965 referred to the former Mitcham Stadium.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Mitcham Park

Mitcham Park is a road that runs from off the south side of Cricket Green by the Mitcham Police station, and connects to the east side of the London Road, north of the former Mitcham railway station.

As of 2018, Royal Mail lists four postcodes for this road:

CR4 4EN : odd numbers 1 to 31
CR4 4EG : even numbers 2 to 32 and East Lodge
CR4 4EP : odd numbers 29 to 59
CR4 4EJ : even numbers 34 to 106.

The block of flats on the corner with London Road, was built on the site of 389, 391 and 393 London Road in 2005/6. The block consist of 28 flats, and it was given the address of 59 Mitcham Park. See planning permission 04/P2012.

1953 OS map

Other OS maps below show the development of the road.
1894
1910
1933

An auction in 1902 describes the two semi-detached houses on the west side of Mitcham park: from the South London Press – Saturday 09 August 1902, via the British Newspaper Archives.

Close to Mitcham Common – TWO PAIRS of semi-detached ViLLAS, known as Nos. 1, 3, 5, and 7, Mitcham Park. Each house contains five bed rooms, two reception rooms, kitchen, and usual offices. No. 1 let at £60 per annum. Nos. 5 and 7 let at £55 per annum each. No. 9 will be sold with the advantage of vacant possession, but of the estimated rental value of £60 per annum, at which rental it now Iet. Lease about 90 years; ground rent £8 each.

Douglas Young & co. will sell the above by AUCTION, at the Mart, E.C., on Wednesday, September 10, 1902, at 2 o’clock precisely. Particulars and conditions of sale may be obtained at the Mart. E.C : of the Solicitors, Messrs. GEDGE, KIRBY, & MILLETT. 11, Great George-street. Westminster: or of the Auctioneers, 51, Coleman-street. K.C., and 213, Clapham-road. S.W.

These aerial photos of the houses show their single, high pitch roof which differs from the other houses that have double-pitched roofs.

Semis 1 & 3, and 5 & 7, Mitcham Park

West side of Mitcham park, from number 1 at the top to number 19 and the bottom

Occupants

1904
West Side
1, Miss COLES
5, John Marsh PITT
7, George BRIDGE
15, Rev. John EDGELL
19, William W. THOMSON
33, Hugh Knight
37, Reginald Pocock BARROW
39, Charles OGDEN
43, Evans FAWCUS
47, Joseph BEARDMORE
53, James W. BOWDING
55, Col. Ernest GRATTAN

East Side

East Lodge, James JOHNSON
2, Felix Andre Jules MOYSE
6, Francis Ringler THOMSON
10, P.A. LEON
12, Mrs HARVIE
14, A.I. SUCKLING-BARON
16, Arthur Ernest ANWYL
22, Miss ANDERSON
26, Arthur Henry BALFOUR
28, Alfred MILLER
32, Wilson ALDWINCKLE

Note that all of these houses, from 15 to 55, and 2 to 32, are of the same design, namely double-pitched roofs with square-U layout to rear.

1953 OS map

This map of 1894 shows the land around Mitcham Hall where Mitcham Park was built, up to Jeppos Lane.

1894 OS map

The land was auctioned in the same year, as listed in the Willesden Chronicle – Saturday 12 May 1894, via the British Newspaper Archive.

In a marquee on the Estate, on MONDAY, June 1, 40 Plots, first portion of the Mitcham Park Estate, adjoining the railway station, and in the centre of the town, fronting on the main road from London to Epsom.

Also, in one lot, the Freehold family Mansion, known as Mitcham Hall, with its beautifully-timbered pleasure grounds and gardens of five acres, and two excellent semi-detached villas.

Vender’s Solicitors. Messrs. Gedge, Kirby, and Millett, 1, Old Palace-yard, S.W.; Architect and Surveyor, W. Mac Thompson, Esq., Holly – cottage, Mitcham

This 1910 map shows the square U-shaped houses that were built:

1910 OS map

The 1933 map shows further development of smaller houses along the south side of the road, and between the gaps on the north / west side.

1933 OS map

News Articles

From the Western Daily Press – Friday 16 August 1935:

The birth of a son at Mitcham Park, Mitcham, to Mrs Winifred Freeman — Miss Polly Ward, the revue actress and dancer is announced.

Mrs Freeman is the only daughter of Miss Winifred Ward, the principal boy, and granddaughter of the late Will Poluski, the Victorian comedian. She was married in 1928 to Mr Robert Sydney Freeman, ” the hero of her schooldays.”

Advert from Norwood News – Friday 20 February 1953

WANTED. Teacher, preparatory school for boys and girls. 6 to 7 1/2

Clarendon Preparatory School, 17 Mitcham Park, Mitcham. Tel. Mitcham. 1444

The widow of the Reverend Lipshytz lived at number 6.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Glendene, Love Lane

Possibly the earlier name for number 77 Love Lane CR4 3AW, in use before that road was renumbered.

In 1935 George Victor Dearn, of 77 Love Lane, registered the land that was to become Dearn Gardens. In 1929, planning application number 1515 was submitted by G.V. Dearn of “Glendene”, Love Lane, to build a WC and shed. The assumption then is that these two people are the same and that he didn’t move between 1929 and 1935.

Source: page 20, volume XV of Mitcham Urban District Council minutes, 1929-1930.

Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

1935 : Boxing at Mitcham Baths

From the Mitcham Herald, 20th December, 1935

BOXING AT MITCHAM BATHS.
Bad Luck for Local Men.

Local boxers met with bad luck in their contests at Mitcham Baths on
Monday night, at a tournament in aid of the Wimbledon and Mitcham Poor Children’s Outing Fund.

Butcher Clements, a Morden welter-weight, appeared to be well ahead on points when his contest with Johnny Rust, of South Africa,was stopped by the referee, because Clements had sustained a cut eye, at the end of the third round. Clements had done nearly all the attacking and had forced Rust to fight almost entirely on the defensive. Rust was shaken by a hard right to the stomach, and again by a left swing to the head. In the third round, however, Rust landed an uppercut during a clinch and Clements’ eye was cut.

Jack Bowdery, of Carshalton, missed with a left lead, and was knocked out in the first round by Charlie GORY, of Mitcham. Bowdery made a game effort to rise, but just failed to beat the count.

Jacky Roberts, of Tooting, created a surprise by knocking out Al Roy, of Newcastle, with a body blow in the fifth round.

Over six rounds, Johnny Collier, of Battersea, and Micky Quinn, of Ireland, fought a draw, and Harry Taylor (Tooting) knocked out Fred Dyer (Shepherds Bush) in the second round.

Homefield House

House in Phipps Bridge, home to the Harland family. The varnish factory of William Harland & Sons Ltd. was just to the north, as can be seen on this 1894 map:

1894 OS Map

1894 OS Map

Merton Memories Photos
1920 view of factory buildings
aerial view of factory


Land registered in 1935 by New Ideal Homesteads Ltd., see London Gazette Publication date:10 September 1935 Issue:34197Page:5757

Demolished to make way for Homefield Gardens estate, built by Ideal Homesteads, the same builder of Bramcote Avenue and Denham Crescent.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Montrose, Upper Green

According to Eric Montague in his book Mitcham Histories: 7 The Upper or Fair Green, Mitcham, page 120, Montrose was a red brick house built for Frederick Samson, veterinary surgeon, in the late 19th century. It had replaced an older house which was set back from the road, and had shops in its front gardens.

In 2016, a newsagent ‘Mitcham News’ and a dentist occupy the two shops on the Upper Green in front of this building.

2016

2016

Occupied by dentists, according to the Dentists Registry:

1935 and 1940 : Arthur McEwan
1930, 1935, 1940 and 1942 : Trevor Thomas Oliver

1935 Romany Funeral

IMPRESSIVE ROMANY FUNERAL

Six black horses, with postilions in gold and black uniforms riding the first pair, pulled the hearse at the Mitcham (Surrey) funeral on Monday, of Rebecca Powell, 75-year-old gipsy flower-seller. Two horse-drawn carriages and two motorcars followed the hearse. Then came more than 100 relatives, representing five generations, on foot.

All the men wore blue reefer jackets and blue trousers, and the women were decked in furs and plumes. Thousands of people gathered to watch the Romany funeral. The churchyard was overrun by sightseers and graves were damaged.

Source: Shepton Mallet Journal – Friday 22 November 1935 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)