Tag Archives: 1936

Clarendon Preparatory School, Mitcham Park

Private school that was at 17 Mitcham Park until 1973.

From the Official Guide to Mitcham in 1938:

Clarendon Preparatory School with Kindergarten is situated in the particularly healthy suburb at 17 Mitcham Park, Mitcham, within easy reach of railway stations and buses.

The house is large, bright and airy and has a nice garden. The School
provides a modern, thorough education for girls and boys from 4 to 16 years, with preparation for Higher Examinations. The health capabilities of every pupil are carefully studied. The School Staff are child lovers and keen pyschologists.

Curriculum of the School includes Religious Knowledge, English Language,
Literature and Composition, History, Geography, Arithmetic, Drawing, Physical Training and Tennis.

One of the features of the School has been the Dramatic, Art and Elocution Tuition open to girls and boys from 4 to 16 years at a very moderate fee. The pupils of the School derive great pleasure from these courses and public concerts are given during the year.

There is also a very successful Dancing Class, Ballroom and Musical Comedy being given.

ad from the 1938 Official Guide to Mitcham

The school closed at the end of 1973 due to the ill health of the headmistress, as told in this article from the 21st December 1973 issue of the Mitcham News & Mercury:

Goodbye Mrs Chips –
head retires and her
school closes too

It’s goodbye Mrs Chips and the end of an educational era with going home time for good at Clarendon, Mitcham’s only private school.

Mrs Nellie Barker, who has reigned for 37 years as headmistress, closed the school last week. She is retiring and selling the building in Mitcham Park.

“I honestly think it would be very difficult to sell it as a school. I am very sad about it but times have changed. I have been ill and my husband has wanted me to give it up for a long time. But I couldn’t, it had become part of my life, but now I really mist,: she said.

Mrs Barker took over Clarendon in 1936 after first helping out and then being asked to become its headmistress. But it was a private school for the education of the children of Mitcham’s business and professional families long before then.

And now, as the surrounding villas in Mitcham Park have become slightly less exclusive and slightly more converted into flats, Clarendon too has fallen to the onslaught of progress.

The school’s 70 children have now gone to other private schools or local state schools.

“Many of our parents are very upset about this. There are still many parents who value our way of teaching where the emphasis is on learning and which is not afraid of discipline when necessary, she said.

“I don’t think any of my children could have held my belief in discipline against me because when they have left and grown up they often come and see me. And many have sent their own children along.

“At times I have had school inspectors here who have told me that there should be allowed more time for play. But I believe in learning – the children were allowed time for play but if modern day educationalists had their way they would be playing all day!”

Mrs Barker is to go and live in Cheam and is to spend more time on her hobby – writing children’s plays.

Mitcham had trolley buses from 1936 to 1960

Mitcham and Tooting Advertiser, 7th July, 1960, page 1

GOODBYE TO
TROLLEYS

630 service makes way for buses

DETAILS of the change from trolley-buses to the new 64-seater diesel “Routemaster” buses on the 630 West Croydon-Hammersmith route which passes through Mitcham were announced by London Transport this week. The alteration will bring an improved bus service in Mitcham.

Diesel vehicles will begin to run across Mitcham Common for the first time on Wednesday, July 20, following the same route as the trolley-buses. The number on the front of the buses will be changed from 630 to 220 and the diesels will take passengers through to Park Royal at the northern end of the run at peak periods, instead of stopping at Harrow Road (as the present 630s do).

When the change-over comes, London Transport plan to augment their service during weekday rush hours between Mitcham and Shepherd’s Bush with extra vehicles.

At the Southern end of the present 630 route, an important alteration will be the extension of the existing bus route 64 (Addington—Selsdon—West Croydon).

FUMES

London Transport will run this service from West Croydon over the common through Mitcham and Tooting along the 630 route to a terminus at Wimbledon Stadium. The extension of the 64s will also improve the regularity of service between Croydon and Tooting – the 630s have for years been seriously affected in this area due to traffic congestion on more northerly stretches.
This change in the services at Mitcham marks the half-way stage in the replacement of L.T.E. trolley-buses by diesels. Routes 626 and 628 will go at the same time and Hammersmith depot will close down.

Trolley buses followed trams at Mitcham in 1936. London Transport say the main factor behind of preferring diesels to silent, smell-free trolleys is the maintenance of an absolutely flexible service.

Running costs for the two systems are said to be about the same, but the present generation of trolleys are nearing the end of their useful economic life and to continue with the overhead-wire system would involve a large capital expenditure.

A spokesman for London Transport said a continuous close check was kept on the exhaust fumes of their vehicles to ensure that irritation from dirty smoke was eliminated as far as possible.

clip from Merton Memories, photo reference Mit_Transport_25-1 of trolley bus 630 – copyright London Borough of Merton

See also history of bus route 220.

South Suburban Co-Op, 37/39 Upper Green East

Numbers 37 and 39, Upper Green East, is a single building with, currently in 2018, a Cost Cutter shop with flats above. The postcode is CR4 2PF.

The co-op was not listed in the 1930 commercial directory, but is in the 1938 edition, with a telephone number of 3937.

It is presumed that this was built in the mid 1930s by the South Suburban Co-operative Society, which was a co-op based in Croydon. The society merged in 1984 into the Co-operative Wholesale Society. This ad from 1936 doesn’t give the address, but may be referring to this building:

1936 ad


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Mitcham Vase Trial

Mentioned in the Norwood News – Friday 25 September 1936

Motor Cyclists To Go To Seaside

Streatham and District Motor Cycling Club members on Sunday held a run to observe the Mitcham Vase Trial, in which sixteen members were riding. More than fifty took tea at the Crown, Ewhurst.

Next week-end there will be a farewell trip to the sea for both a night run and a camping run have been booked for that date. The destination for both these parties is Swanage, and the campers will leave the clubroom at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday. The all-night party leave the clubroom at the Cricketers Garage, opposite Mitcham Fire Station, at midnight. Club nights are held every Wednesday and Saturday.

Tea Cosy coffee shop

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, April 17th, 1936

‘Tea Cosy’ coffee shop, at corner of London Road & Morden road, to disappear for reconstruction of railway bridge at Mitcham station.

Mrs M. Cottle, 87, owned the shop for 27 years. “When I came here the place was just a village and business was remarkably good. I used to serve many lorry drivers here but now they can’t pull up here, so I don’t get their custom so much.”

“Some people say I should retire, but I should be thoroughly miserable with nothing to do. I have the best of health, and while I feel as I do at present I want to keep busy.”

Sunshine Way – Ownership

Sunshine Way, Mitcham, Surrey CR4 3HQ (all houses in this road, including the flats, have the same postcode).

This is a crescent-shaped road off the south side of Bond Road in Mitcham.

1952 OS Map

Number 1 is on the corner with Bond Road, and is separated by a footpath from the eastern square of houses, numbered odd from 2 to 29. The square was originally a grass playing area that was turned into car parking spaces in 1991. See planning permission 91/P0276.

Number 31 Sunshine way is a block of 20 flats, named Donald Lynch House, numbered 1 to 20 sequentially, that was built on playing fields between the two squares. Planning application MER940/73 suggests that this was built in late 1973, early 1974.

The Welcome Hall and caretaker’s house is separate and south of the flats. This was converted, in 1994/5, into housing, numbered 37A and 37B. See planning permission 94/P0245.

The southern square has houses numbered odd from 39 to 61. Like the eastern square, its grass playing area was converted to car parking, in 1994. See planning permission 94/P0246.

Number 63 is on the south-western corner with Bond Road and is also separated by an alleyway from the southern square.

The inner circle of houses are numbered even from 2 to 18. Numbers 8 to 14 were originally ‘sunshine’ houses, with an open roof area for TB patients to sleep in the open air. These areas have since been converted to bedrooms.

Numbers 1 and 8 to 14 even are registered under title SGL506115. Numbers 2, 20, and 63 are registered under title SGL396963.

The road itself, the squares numbered 3 to 29, and 39 to 61, are shown on the Land Registry Title Plan as under title TGL21177, which was originally registered on 24th January, 1936.

The registered owner of these titles is

THE RIVERSIDE GROUP LIMITED (Industrial and Provident Society No. IP30938R) of 2 Estuary Boulevard, Estuary Commerce Park, Speke, Liverpool L24 8RF.

which became owner on 20th April, 2010.

In the inner circle of houses, number 10 was sold for £170,000 on 18th July 2008. Its registered title is SGL700262, and hence was removed from title SGL506115.

1936 : Boxing at Mitcham Baths

From the Mitcham Herald, 13th November, 1936

BOXING AT MITCHAM BATHS.

In aid of the Wimbledon and Mitcham Poor Children’s Outing Fund, a boxing tournament was held at Mitcham Baths on Monday.

Fred King (Carshalton) was to have fought Bert Francis (Woolwich) over ten rounds, but Francis was found to be well over a stone the heavier, and King declined to meet him. Instead, he fought Harry Taylor (Tooting), whom he knocked out in the second round. King had plaster over both eyebrows.
In a ten-rounds middle weight contest Pat Mulcahey (Croydon) was awarded
the decision on points over Fred Taylor (Canning Town).

Over six rounds, Young Waterman (Canning Town) outpointed Darkie Benito (Croydon); Tony Smith (Canning Town) outpointed Jack WILLIS (Mitcham); and Freddie LYONS (Mitcham) fought a draw with Jimmy Kelly (Walworth).