Tag Archives: 1931

Cedars Avenue

Road that runs south westerly from Tamworth Lane to Commonside East where it crosses Mitcham Common to Croydon Road near the junction with Carshalton Road. The part of the road across the Common was a footpath until it was widened in 1930/31.

From the minutes of the Mitcham Urban District council
Volume XVI May 1930 to April 1931
Highways Committee
4th June 1930
Page 115

IMPROVEMENTS.

I lay before you plans for the construction of a new road from Watneys Road to Galpins Road at an estimated cost of £3,880.

I also lay before you plans for the widening and reoonstruction of New Road from the common from Blue House Bridge to Cedars Road, at an intimated cost of £5,391.

In both cases it is proposed to maintain a footway on one side only, and in the case of the first mentioned road the width of the carriageway is 18 ft., and in the latter instance 24 ft. with 5 ft. footpath.

Yours obediently,
Riley Schofield, Assoc.M.Inst.C.E.,
Engineer and Surveyor.

Resolved –

(f) Improvements, Mitcham Common – That the Committee defer consideration of the plans for construction of a new road from Watneys Road to Galpins Road and for the widening and reconstruction of New Road across the Common from Blue Houses Bridge to Cedars Road, pending the decision of the Conservators with regard to the promotion of a Bill in Parliament.

This OS map from 1910 shows the route of road and footpath to the Blue House pub:

1910 OS map

It also shows two large houses off the east side of the road, and opposite the drive that led to Brenley. The names of these can be seen on this 1953 OS map, as The Chantry and Radstock.

1953 OS map

In the 1964 electoral register, the houses in Cedars Avenue were listed as:

No. 1,3 and 5
Brenley
Newholme
Orchard Cottage
Malvern
Devonia
Havrincourt
The Cedars
Radstock
The Chantry
The Orchard
Malgarry
Clonmel

Rear garden of The Orchard. Photo kindly supplied by a former resident.

Cedars Avenue looking towards Commonside East. Havrincourt is on the left. Photo kindly supplied by a former resident of The Orchard.

The houses on the east side of the road were renumbered even, starting from the Commonside East end, possibly in the 1930s. The 1939 for sale ad below for Devonia was the same as an ad listed for no. 2.

Road being surfaced in the 1960s. See comment below by Alan Hutchings.

News articles and adverts

Norwood News – Friday 14 April 1939

MITCHAM COMMON (partially overlooking).

Bright semi-detached freehold; vacant possession; 2 receptions, 3 bedrooms, kitchen, separate w.c., nice garden; £745. – Apply on premises, “Devonia”, Cedars-avenue, Mitcham; Mitcham 4130.

Norwood News – Saturday 13 November 1926
Image © Reach PLC. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

Text of ad:

MITCHAM
(Immediately facing Common and Golf Links).
(By tram alight at Blue House).
Substantially Built Brick and Tile
FREEHOLD HOUSES.
3 and 4 bedrooms. Every modern convenience.
Room for Garage.
£975 to £1,200.
LIBERAL MORTGAGE ARRANGED.
Apply, any time, any day, to:-
PYLE, Contractor,
Corner of Cedars Avenue and Commonside East,
MITCHAM, Surrey.


Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Lance Sergeant Victor John Cullum

Photo courtesy of Margaret Purnell

Born in the first quarter of 1908.

He married Florence Harwood in 1931. In 1939 they lived in 29 Franklin Crescent, Mitcham.

His daughter Margaret Purnell said :

My dad served with the RA 1939-1946. He managed to escape with others from Singapore during the Japanese invasion of Malaya in 1942.

He was a Mitcham man from 1931 to 1973.

The British Army Casualty Lists 1939-1945 show a Lance Sergeant V. J. Cullum, Royal Artillery, service number 2040217, captured 15th February 1942. This is from The National Archives, reference WO 361/2058, POWs Far East Master Roll 1942-1943 (ABC).

His wife received the standard letter saying that he may have been captured, or is missing:

His daughter said that he wasn’t captured …

… although the army thought that was the case at the time.

Extract from my dad’s diary

’14th Feb 1942: – managed to leave the docks on HMS Penang, a small coastal boat. Under heavy gunfire for 2 hours for a long distance out. In the meantime, Singapore Docks were blazing furiously. They were pushed into Hold by Officers, sitting on drums of Kerosene. “Going to be unlucky if hit”. Got stuck on sandbank 2 hours out. Captain orders “Take to Lifeboats”. Our boat was holed by shell splinters, took all our time to keep afloat. Commandeered a Chinese Junk – “Penang” signaled to come back, had slid off bank. Mechanics had to take over engines. I volunteered with Rattue for Bofors gun duties; was glad to get out of Hold…………………….

They eventually docked & camped at Colombo March 10th 1942. Most of them were ill with various ailments. Back in the UK, my mum received a letter

“V.J.Cullum missing dated March 15, presumed dead” and telling her to get her papers in order. She received a telegram from my dad at the same time saying that he was safe….

The telegram he sent his wife:

In the Battle of Singapore, Britain surrendered on 15th February 1942.