Tag Archives: 1938

St Marks Road

Road that today runs eastwards from London Road, where the Baths used to be, then curves south to the end of Majestic Way and heads east again to Lammas Avenue.

Originally called Killick’s Lane until the St Marks church was built in 1898. It was named after Samuel Killick, a local builder who had his yard there. Amongst the various local buildings, his name is mentioned on the blue plaque at the parish vicarage, which reads:

This building, erected by Samuel Killick in 1826 for the Rev. Richard Cranmer, replaces an earlier vicarage.

The fanlight and the unusual pattern of window glazing bars are interesting features.

1910 OS map

Numbers 1 to 7 on the north side of St Marks Road at the London Road end was known as York Place.

The 1911 street directory shows two lines of houses both called St Mark’s Villas. The first is a terrace of 4 houses to the west of the school, and the second a group of 8 houses as 4 semi-detached houses, numbered from 1 to 8 from the corner with Lansdell Road. Below are the occupants from this directory, as described from London Road towards Eastfields:

NORTH SIDE

1, John K. HARVEY, chemist
2, John Samuel WRIGHT, dining rooms
3, George YORK, undertaker
4, James PRICE, hair dresser
5, William WHITTINGTON, tobacconist
6, W.A.MARTIN, butcher
7, Mrs S. RIMMEL, grocer

STAIR COTTAGES:

1, John TAYLOR
2, William Jesse LUNT
3, Frederick BURTON
4, Albert Edward BLAND
5, William TYLER
6, William LAWRENCE

ST. MARK’S VILLAS:

4, John SUDDS
3, John William GILMORE
2, John William MONKS
1, George WHITTINGHAM

St. Mark’s Sunday School
Walter JORDAN (School house)
Council Schools

ST. MARK’S VILLAS:

8, Frederick WHITE
7, Alfred R. CHEAL
6, Charles Henry J SIVIOUR
5, Noel Austin HARVEY
4, George William LAWRENCE
3, Henry BENNETT
2, Walter BLACKSTONE
1, William MATTHEWS

…. here is Lansdell Road

SOUTH SIDE
RAVENSBURY COTTAGES:
8, Thomas CLARKE
7, Charles TARRANT
6, Henry DRINKWATER
5, Mrs ROBERTS
4, Edward BURTON
3, Mrs E. KILBY

Alfred NASH & Sons, wheelwrights

George Arthur MIZEN
F.L. & A.G. MIZEN, market gardeners
St. Marks Church

Between Stair’s Cottages and the School House, the 1922 electoral register shows two terraces: South View Cottages and South Place, each with four dwellings. The order shown in the register is repeated here.

SOUTH VIEW COTTAGES
1, John William and Eva Jessie GILMORE
2, Alfred and Bathsheba OLDMEADOW
3, John and Betsy WADDINGTON
4, David and Lily JONES

SOUTH PLACE
4, John JORDAN; John William and Kate HAWKINS
3, William Charles and Kate COLLYER
2, Alfred, Mary and Alfred junior COUSALL
1, Ernest Edward and Elizabeth Lucy JONES

In the 1925 street directory, all the houses have been renumbered.

Stairs Cottages from 6 to 1 were renumbered 15 to 25 St Marks Road.

South View Cottages 1 to 4 were renumbered 29 to 35 St Marks Road, see 1925 directory below, and South Place from 4 to 1 were renumbered 37 to 43.

The School House became number 47, occupied by Frederick, Alice and Frederick Henry NEWSOM.

Houses named Doniford became number 59 and Astroea became 61.

NORTH SIDE
Fair green:

1, John K. HARVEY M.P.S., chemist
3, William SCRATCHLEY, dining rooms
5, George YORK, undertaker
7, H. TEDDER, hair dresser
9, William WHITTINGTON, tobacconist
11, A. BACON, hosier
13, S. & E. RIMMEL, grocers
15, Edward Charles STEVENS
17, William MERSH, boot repairer
19, Mrs BURTON
21, Frederick WELLER
23, William WELLER; Miss WELLER, pianoforte teacher
23 (back of) Thomas WELLER, cartage contractor
25, Herbert Fras. Joe SMITH
29, John William GILMORE
31, Alfred OLDMEADOW
33, John WADDINGTON
35, David JONES
37, John William HAWKINS
39, William Charles COLLYER
41, COUSALL & Sons, coal merchants
43, Alfred COUSALL

St Mark’s Parish Room
Upper Mitcham Girls’ School (Surrey Education Committee)

47, Frederick NEWSOM, school keeper
49, Rd. TOWNSEND, coal merchant
49, CARBONIUS Co. compresses carbon manufacturers

59, Henry William AYRES
61, Herbert CORNELL
63, (Sunbury) James LAW
65, (Tolworth) Miss SHEPHERD
67, (Belmont) Frederick SAWYERS
69, (Ardley) Mrs SELLAR
71, (Tongham) A. WARE
73, (Colyton) Alfred CRAIG
75, (Abinger) F. LITTLE
77, John WHALEBONE

83, Frederick WHITE
85, Alfred Robert CHEAL
87, W.L. WHITELEY
89, Mrs A.M. BENNETT
91, Robert J. WELCH
93, Harry BENNETT, insurance agent
95, Walter BLACKSTONE
97, William MATTHEWS

SOUTH SIDE

St. Mark’s Church

…. here is Baker’s Lane

(Maycroft) James Ernest PELLING
(Granville) William W. ORVES
(Kenwood) Charles EVELYN
(Glan-y-Mor) George MARRIN
34, William Henry BEWEN
32, (Homestead) Robert WILSON
30, HUDSON & BLAKE, automobile engineers
28, Oliver BROWN Ltd., varnish manufacturers
26, (Home Close) Charles LACK
24, Edgar HUME
22, Alfred REES
20, Mrs F. BENNETT
16, James DREWETT
14, Mrs MILLS
12, Miss RUFF
10, Edward BURTON
8, Stephen TAYLOR; Henry DRINKWATER
4, Mrs TARRANT
2, Thomas CLARK

Note that at no. 13, S. & E. RIMMEL, grocers, was also listed in the 1911 directory at the same address (when it was no.7) and Sarah E. Rimmel, grocers, was listed in the 1938 commercial directory.

Charles LACK was the son of Hannah LACK who ran the drapers at 4 High Street, Mitcham. With his wife Emily he ran the drapers at no. 2 next door. (From a descendant who made a comment about this on the Facebook Mitcham History group.)

The St Mark’s Parish Room was originally a ‘School Church’ whose appointed mission clergyman in 1891 was the Reverend F.J. LANSDELL whose name is the origin of Lansdell Road.

This OS map from 1952 shows the houses numbered as in the 1925 directory:

1952 OS map

Note that no.s 1 to 43 and the St Marks Parish Room have now gone and is where the pedestrian Majestic Way is today, and that no.s 27 to 35 were set back from the road, this is where the Morrison supermarket is now, and between the supermarket and the school is where St Marks Road today diverts north and west through where the Mitcham Baths was.

Between the school and no. 59 is where Armfield Crescent is today, and between 77 and 83 is now Bedfont Close.

On the south side, the paint works at 28 have gone, and that is where Chalkley Close is today. Number 26 is owned by the Royal British Legion and hosts the Poppy Club. Number 30 is still there.


Adverts

undated ad for GM Paynter at 13 St Marks Road


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Alfred Ernest Gardner & Son, House Furnishers, 23-25 Commonside West

Furniture dealer that was at 23-25 Commonside West, near the Windmill pub.

1934 ad which states that the firm was established in 1845


In the 1896 directory, Thomas Gardner is listed as furniture dealer & shopkeeper, Common Side west.

1936 clip from Tom Francis photo of Albert Ernest Gardner’s furniture stores, from Merton Memories phot reference Mit_​2_​10-11 copyright London Borough of Merton.

In the 1912 directory, Alfd. E. Gardner, Common side west, is listed as a manager of the Zion Congregational School. In the 1938 commercial directory the address is given as 25 Commonside West.

Beacon Garage

Garage that was at 189/191 Streatham Road, on the east side of the road on the north corner of Melrose Avenue. Currently a block of flats possibly built in 2009/2010.

1950 OS map

ad from April 1962

ad from 1938

Text of ad:

TELEPHONE:
MITCHAM 2941

AGENTS FOR
A.A. & R.A.C.

BEACON GARAGE CO. LTD.

AUTOMOBILE AND GENERAL ENGINEERS

Electric Pumps, High Pressure
Washing and Greasing, Welding
and Vulcanizing Equipments

ANY CAR SUPPLIED.
CASH OR DEFERRED TERMS
CARS FOR HIRE

Open Day and Night

189 STREATHAM ROAD MITCHAM

Listed in the 1930 commercial directory as

Beacon Garage Co. Ltd. motor engnrs. 189 Streatham rd. T N 2941


In 2007, planning application 07/P3668 from the Genesis Housing Group to build a block of flats on this site was refused, but was later allowed in 2009 after an appeal. The application was for

Construction of four-storey block consisting of commercial units on ground floor (uses within classes A1(retail), A2 (financial and professional services) and B1 (business) and 14 residential units, with associated access, parking & works.

The site had become a petrol filling station and when this application was submitted it had been no longer in use as such.

F.W. Jackson, jewellers

Jewellers shop that was at 157 Streatham Road, on the south side of the corner with Elmhurst Avenue.

1950 OS map

1938 ad

Text of ad:

It will pay you to visit

F.W.JACKSON’S

for

rings, jewellery, watches
clocks, cutlery, china
decorative glass, pottery
and silverware

Specialists in
watch and clock repairs

Highest prices given for old gold

All Estimates Free. Send us a post card and we will call

157 Streatham Road, Mitcham
(Corner of Elmhurst Avenue)

Listed in the 1938 directory as Frederick William Jackson, watch repairer, no telephone number.

The 1938 Official Guide to Mitcham said:

The name of F.W. Jackson, the Mitcham Jeweller and Watchmaker of 157 Streatham Road, has established itself in almost every household in Mitcham. After serving an apprenticeship in Clerkenwell – the hive of clock and watchmaking – young Will Jackson travelled north as far as Manchester and attached himself to high-class retail houses to gain experience. Returning to London he soon gained a reputation as a keen buyer and connoisseur of antiques in London sale rooms. Premises were opened in Streatham Road, and within two years the trade had so increased that larger and more commodius premises were secured at 157 Streatham Road (corner of Elmhurst Avenue). Here you will find him surrounded by a most attractive array of stock worthy of any West End jeweller. Mr Jackson claims his success was due to close supervision of all works entrusted to him.

The 1939 Register shows Frederick W Jackson living at this address as having a date of birth of 28th December 1912, and occupation as watchmaker and jeweller.

In 2019, the shop is a convenience store.

Comments from the Mitcham History Group on Facebook:

Became a wool shop in later years.

Howard’s Brookfields Estate

Advertised in 1938:

Charming but inexpensive homes are to be found in Mitcham and none are more attractive than those on Howard’s Brookfields Estate which is situated on the London Road. Buses pass the end of the estate’s own concrete roads, linking Acton and Belmont.
Only three minutes away from the estate is Mitcham (Southern Railway) Station, with its frequent services to Tooting, Croydon, Wimbledon, and thence to all parts of London, and not more than ten minutes walk is Mitcham Junction Station from which leave many fast trains to the London Termini.

Despite such accessibility, however, the estate retains something of that quiet peace which more and more home-makers are seeking beyond the whirl of London.

It is with the benefit of such surroundings that the houses on this estate have been erected : their sound construction, labour-saving design and attractive appearance are in keeping. Leasehold (99 years), the prices range from £625 (total weekly outgoings approximately £1 5s. 2d. including repayment ground rents, rates and water) for centre houses, to £650 (£1 5s. 11d. weekly) for end houses, and £675 (£1 6s. 11d. weekly) for semi-detached houses. Freehold, the prices are £795 (£1 6s. 6d. weekly), £825 (£1 7s. 3d. weekly) and £850 (£1 8s. 5d. weekly). There are three types of houses, from which purchasers may choose.

Fundamentally, however, these houses are constructed to the one well-considered design. With a drawing room (12 ft. 9 ins. by 11 ft. ins.) and a dining room (12 ft. 11/2 ins. by 10 ft. 3 ins.) a pleasant hall and a kitchen (10 ft. by 6 ft. 9 ins.), upstairs three bedrooms, two large and one small with bathroom and separate w.c. supply the accommodation which the average family finds most convenient.

Here, in fact, are homes that are in no way pretentious – but are lastingly comfortable, and well equipped. There is the fitted kitchen for instance. With walls and floor partly tiled, with notably complete cupboard and larder fittings, folding table, sink cabinet with two teak drainers, and the all-important enamelled “Ideal” boiler and enamelled gas copper.

Then there are the attractive tiled fireplaces in the drawing and dining rooms and the sensible electric panel fires in two of the bedrooms. There is the heated linen cupboard, and tiled bathroom with enclosed panelled bath, fitted with mixer and hot shower. Numerous gas, electric and radio points assure the maximum of convenience throughout.

Nor has that thoughtful planning stopped short at the house itself; not only are there good paths already made, but at the back is a brick-built coal bunker. Space for a garage is included in the garden. What is more, these homes have the very great advantage of being guaranteed brick construction throughout. With no road charges, legal charges or other extras, this estate of 200 homes is meeting the requirements of a great number of careful purchasers.

The estate was built on the site of the Brookfields Nursery. An ad in the 1929 town guide has

Mitcham Lavender

J.N. CHESHIRE

Nurseryman and Florist

Brookfields Nursery
463 London Road

comprising 9 acres on the Banks of the River Wandle

Wreaths and Bouquets made to order
Telephone No. 2244 Mitcham

John Norkett CHESHIRE is listed as Market Gardener at the same address in the 1930 and 1938 commercial directories.

1932 OS map showing the Brookfield Nurseries

This 1938 map shows the estate taking shape:

1938 OS map


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Clarendon Preparatory School, Mitcham Park

Private school that was at 17 Mitcham Park until 1973.

From the Official Guide to Mitcham in 1938:

Clarendon Preparatory School with Kindergarten is situated in the particularly healthy suburb at 17 Mitcham Park, Mitcham, within easy reach of railway stations and buses.

The house is large, bright and airy and has a nice garden. The School
provides a modern, thorough education for girls and boys from 4 to 16 years, with preparation for Higher Examinations. The health capabilities of every pupil are carefully studied. The School Staff are child lovers and keen pyschologists.

Curriculum of the School includes Religious Knowledge, English Language,
Literature and Composition, History, Geography, Arithmetic, Drawing, Physical Training and Tennis.

One of the features of the School has been the Dramatic, Art and Elocution Tuition open to girls and boys from 4 to 16 years at a very moderate fee. The pupils of the School derive great pleasure from these courses and public concerts are given during the year.

There is also a very successful Dancing Class, Ballroom and Musical Comedy being given.

ad from the 1938 Official Guide to Mitcham

The school closed at the end of 1973 due to the ill health of the headmistress, as told in this article from the 21st December 1973 issue of the Mitcham News & Mercury:

Goodbye Mrs Chips –
head retires and her
school closes too

It’s goodbye Mrs Chips and the end of an educational era with going home time for good at Clarendon, Mitcham’s only private school.

Mrs Nellie Barker, who has reigned for 37 years as headmistress, closed the school last week. She is retiring and selling the building in Mitcham Park.

“I honestly think it would be very difficult to sell it as a school. I am very sad about it but times have changed. I have been ill and my husband has wanted me to give it up for a long time. But I couldn’t, it had become part of my life, but now I really mist,: she said.

Mrs Barker took over Clarendon in 1936 after first helping out and then being asked to become its headmistress. But it was a private school for the education of the children of Mitcham’s business and professional families long before then.

And now, as the surrounding villas in Mitcham Park have become slightly less exclusive and slightly more converted into flats, Clarendon too has fallen to the onslaught of progress.

The school’s 70 children have now gone to other private schools or local state schools.

“Many of our parents are very upset about this. There are still many parents who value our way of teaching where the emphasis is on learning and which is not afraid of discipline when necessary, she said.

“I don’t think any of my children could have held my belief in discipline against me because when they have left and grown up they often come and see me. And many have sent their own children along.

“At times I have had school inspectors here who have told me that there should be allowed more time for play. But I believe in learning – the children were allowed time for play but if modern day educationalists had their way they would be playing all day!”

Mrs Barker is to go and live in Cheam and is to spend more time on her hobby – writing children’s plays.

Cecilia

Ladies’ hair stylist, 160 London Road, from pre and post WW2 period.

clip from 1953 photo on Merton Memories, copyright Phox Studios, image reference Mit_Streets_Lon_38-49

ad from 1938

1952 ad

Text of ad:

For All Hair
and Scalp
Troubles
consult
“CECILIA”
Ladies’ Hair Stylist

160 London Road, Mitcham

Jamal & Eugene
Specialists

‘Phone: MIT 3377

Agents for Coty and Max Factor
Peggy Sage
Revlon