Tag Archives: 1925

Love Lane

Following the road as it is currently numbered, it starts as a footpath off Church Road along the eastern side of the parish churchyard, and continues to Western Road.

1954 OS map showing the start of Love Lane at Church Road

Eric Montague, in his book, 12 Church Street and Whitford Lane, chapter 6, said that Love Lane almost certainly dated back to the Middle Ages as it served as the access lane to strips of land that stretched north of it. These strips were around a furlong, or 22 yards, in length, and the layouts of roads such as Frimley Gardens and Rodney Road to Fox’s Path, another access lane.

Entrance to Love Lane from Church Road. Photo taken when four 3-bed houses were being built on this corner by the Beaver Housing Society in 1996/7, which is now numbered as 82A Church Road.

In Love Lane, the houses with even numbers 2, 4 and 6 are on the right in the first part of the footpath, then 8, 10 and 12 are round the corner as the path heads east.

Then there is a block of four houses numbered 14, 16, 18 and 20, that have a datestone identifying it as Laburnum Cottages.

LABURNUM COTTAGES W. F. 1853

This block can be seen on this 1866 OS map:

1866 OS map

After this block the footpath ends, and on the left is a terrace of 6 houses, numbered 1 to 11. This has a name plate in the middle, partially obscured by a drainpipe, which says ‘Hope Terrace’.

Opposite this terrace are houses built around 1983, as planning permission MER170/83 was granted on 21st April 1983. They are numbered with suffixes.

Next to these houses on the right side of Love Lane is a three storey block of 12 flats called Frimley House, which has numbers 22 to 44. Possibly built late 1930s or post-WW2 as the block is not shown on the 1933 OS map.

Opposite Frimley House, and past Hope Terrace, are two pairs of semi-detached houses, numbers 11A and 15, 17 and 19. Next to 19 is number 21, a detached house that is on the corner with Frimley Gardens.

After this the roadway turns right into Church Place but Love Lane continues as a footpath until Edmund Road. On the right can be seen the remains of the entrance to the council depot.

Breeze block filling where entrance to depot was. Photo taken 20th April 2016.

Past Harwood Avenue, the next houses on Love Lane are a pair of semi-detached on the left numbered 23 (Hope Cottage) and 25 (Rose Cottage). This is the only remaining pair of such cottages from those that were built in the early 19th century. The 1896 street directory describes walking from Church Street to Western Road, i.e. in a easterly direction, and the occupants were:

Samuel BEALES (Hope Cottage)
John HUSSEY (Rose Cottage)

23 and 25 Love Lane. Photo taken 21st May 2020

Rose Cottage was the childhood home of William Henry SLATER, who emigrated to Australia in the late 1850s where he was one of the founders of the Mitcham township, now a suburb of Melbourne, Victoria.

This is followed by a terrace of 12 houses, numbered 27 to 49, which has the nameplate in the middle of ‘Douglas Cottages’. These were built in the first decade of the 20th century according to Montague., and were numbered 1 through 12, from west to east. In the 1915 directory Stewart Daniel SLATER, florist, is listed at no. 12.

1954 OS map

After Douglas Cottages is currently a nursery school, built in the early 1960s after a pair of semi-detached cottages, numbered 55 and 57, called Dent’s Cottages, was demolished. The Mitcham News & Mercury had an article in the 2nd September 1960 issue: 132-year old Love Lane cottage to come down.

Further along on the left hand side, after Dearn Gardens, are two detached houses that are set back from the road side at an angle, number 75 and number 77, the latter of which may have been called Glendene when it was occupied by George Victor DEARN, who developed Dearn Gardens.

75 Love Lane with its arched chimney stacks. Photo taken 21st May 2020

Next is a 3-storey block of 6 flats, numbered 79, 81, 83 and 79a, 81a, 83a. After which is a block of 2 houses, 85 and 87, with a third added on, number 89.

Houses numbers 103 to 121 were built in 1934 as part of the Pear Tree Close estate.

An older terrace of 4 houses, numbered 123 to 129, north of the corner with Westfield Road, dated from the 1880s, as are the similar houses on the north side of Westfield Road, according to Montague. The 1910-1911 street directory lists these houses as Knapdale Villas, with these occupants:

1, Frederick NEWSOM
2, Thomas ARTHUR
3, John HINCKLEY

A photo from around 1970 on Merton Memories, incorrectly labelled as Gladstone Road, shows these houses with their original slate roofs.

From Merton Memories, photo reference Mit_Streets_D_LEW_29-2

From the current footpath that leads to the Glebe Path and Queen Anne’s Gardens, on the right hand side of Love Lane northwards, were 6 pairs of semi-detached houses, all demolished by the end of the 20th century and replaced by houses and bungalows.

1910 OS map

From the 1896 street directory the occupants, in houses numbered from 12 down to 1 heading north, were:

12, William Talbot WALLIS
11, Edward WAINWRIGHT
10, Henry DEARN
9, Miss Susan WOOLSEY, dress maker
8, John STEERS
7, Edward FOSTER (Jasmine Cottage)
6, Thomas RYOTT (Ivy Cottage)
5, James CURRELL
4, George James GREGORY
2, Joseph PRIOR
1, Robert Edward SLATER


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

May Queen in 1925

Norwood News – Tuesday 5th May 1925, page 1

MITCHAM’S MAY QUEEN

PICTURESQUE CEREMONY ON THE CRICKET GREEN

Another attempt has been made to establish a Mitcham May Queen festival on the cricket green. The idea is to make it an annual affair. Success again attended the effort on Saturday.

Mrs. Coun. H. M. Hallowes, the chairman of the local council, attended, and gave the festival her blessing. She thanked the promoters for their determination to make the crowning of the May Queen a hardy annual on the Cricket Green at Mitcham, and promised them all the support and encouragement within her power. She favoured the festival because of the happiness and training it brought into the lives of the children.

The festival really emanates from the Brownies and Young Guides. Miss Law as the captain taking the lead, and it is to her chiefly, assisted by Mrs. Jolly and others, that the May celebration takes place.

Nearly a hundred Mitcham children took part, the girls being dressed in white with white shoes or sandals, and wore wreaths of flowers. The boys appeared in costumes representing archers, heralds, or farmers.

PROCESSION

A public procession through the main roads of Mitcham was watched with admiration by crowds of people. Everybody agreed it was a pleasing sight, and the children looked pretty. Fortunately, the rain kept off and did not mar their pleasure, or inconvenience them.

On arrival the Cricket Green, a public performance of crowning the May Queen was gone through with all the pomp and splendour associated with the old-time custom. Connie Wells, aged 12, made a very dainty May Queon, and in her canopy of floral boughs, she was crowned “Queen of the May,” by Irene Jones, a typical representation of Prince Charming.

OTHER CHARACTERS.

Other characters, suitably attired were the following :-

Trainbearers. — Winnie Wells, Barbara Oakes.

Maids of Honour. — Peggy Turner, Chriasie Keeffe, Margaret Mugridge, Gladys Sykes.

Pages. — Gwennie Jarman,Gracie Bishop, Peggy Scott, Peggy Carlton.

Prince. — Irene Jones.

Heralds. – Allan Millbank, Douglas Jolley.

Crown Bearer. — May Thomson.

Fairy Queen.- Gladys Siviour.

Fairies.— Reta Ashford, Gwennie Siviour, Doris Cox, Ruby Roberts, Sylvia Roberts, Lily Sutcliffe.

BO-Peep.- Gladys Pelling.

Shepherdess. — Pattie Ashforth.

Robin Hood. — Dora Croucher.

Archer. — Geoffrey Jolley.

Columbine. — Mona Watts.

Cupids. — Connie and Sybil Cordier.

Lavender Girls. — Florrie Wells, Girlie Downey.

Maypole Dancers. — Elsie Smith, Maisie Ware, Doris Melhuish, Ivy Sanders, Ivy Warren, Elsie Vagille, Amy Nightingale, Georgina Miles, Margaret Fleckney, Lily Fleckney, Winnie Osbourne, Marie Sayers.

Country Girls. — Daisy Miles, Irene Ault, Ivy Graham, Dolly Sullivan, Marjorie Morris, Ivy Sergeant, Gertie Read, Edith Poulton.

Ballet Dancers.— D. Boreham, B. King, P. Longhurst, M. Douglas, E. Douglas, G. Bennett, V. Morgan, J. Douglas, M. Watts, S. Jolley, R. Palmer.

REVELRIES

The new Queen, duly enthroned, thanked her subjects, and then the revelries began. First, flower strewing, then country dances, and the singing of “Come lassies and lads.”

Woodland ballets and dances by pupils of Miss Ruby May were very smartly done, and earned unstinted applause from the crowd. Taking part in a country dance were D. Boreham, B. King, P. Longhurst, M. Douglas, E. Douglas, G. Bennett, V. Morgan and J. Douglas.

A solo “Fragrance,” by M. Watts; picture gavotte by M. Watts and S. Jolley; solo, D. Boreham; Irish Jig, E. Douglas; dance of the midsummer fairies, M. Douglas, D. Boreham, B. King and M. Watts; solo, M. Douglas; Scotch reel, J. Douglas, chain dance, M. Watts, B. King, D. Boreham and M. Douglas; Welsh dance, D. Boreham and M. Douglas; Welsh dance, R. Palmer; Sailor’s hornpipe, B. King; and characteristic, D. Boreham and M. Douglas; all these efforts delighted the onlookers, and they were well performed by the children, reflecting great credit on their tutors.

Maypole and Morris dancing was also a feature of an interesting programme. The Tooting Wesleyan Central Hall Brass Band, under Mr W.D. Woodcraft, rendered capital music.

In every way, the festival triumphed, and too much praise cannot be bestowed upon the leaders for the amount of labour they must have put into it.