Tag Archives: 1925

Edenvale Road

Road that runs northward from Gorringe Park Avenue, crossing St Barnabas Road to Ashbourne Road. Its shape seems to follow the path that separated Gorringe Park House from the farm on its east side, as shown on this OS map of 1911.

1911 OS map

The 1925 street directory names the road as Eden Vale and lists the properties from number 79 Ashbourne Road:

East side.

North Mitcham Improvement Association Sports Ground
William TYRELL, poultry farm

West side.

1 through 17

… here is Milton rd

19 through 33

This directory only lists odd-numbered houses on the west side of the road. The electoral register for Autumn 1925 also lists only the odd numbers, and the occupants were:

1, Frederick Walter and Ethel CATTERMOLE
3, David MUSTARD; Thomas TAYLOR
5, Joseph William GOBBY; Kezia Maude ADAMS
7, Marguerite BROWITT
9, Harold and Mary Elizabeth ODAM; Mary Elizabeth WOOD
11, David and Annie McGREGOR
13, John Joseph HANDCOCK; William John BATTLE
15, Frederick LIFE; Charles BECKETT
17, George Frederick GOODBODY; Ernest WALLER
19, Thomas Robert and Ethel Elizabeth BLACKMORE; Francis LAMBLE
21, Frederick William HALLET; Bertram Charles AGATE
23, Cecil Armfield WAKELING
25, Elizabeth WISEMAN; Sydney William EADE
27, Walter William and Emily STALLWOOD
29, James Thomas and Hilda JACKSON
31, Minnie TURNER

North Surrey Poultry Farm, Albert and Louise TYRELL

The Autumn 1926 electoral adds some even-numbered houses:

2, Alonzo James & Margaret Mary SHARP
4, William and Jemima and Harold Percy BULL
6, Nellie Hannah GREENSTREET
8, Arthur and Gertrude HULKS
10, Albert George and Lucy Matilda CONSTABLE

North Surrey Poultry Farm, Albert and Louise TYRELL

In the 1929 electoral register appears more even-numbered houses, from 12 to 28:

2, Victor and Florence ANGLE
12, Bernard Eden and Dorothy Charlotte CANDY
14, Frank and Mabel Winifred CHEESMAN
16, George Boswell and Getrude Maud CHAMPNISS; John William McFarlane and Margaret Josephine KIDD
18, Ernest Leslie and Emily Beatrice ANSTY Joseph John and Elsie Mabel IVE
20, Hedley Frank and Margaret Gertrude JACKSON
22, Thomas Joseph and Annie Esther SAGE
24, Frederick William and Rebecca Esther EAGLESTONE
26, Benjamin Frederick James and Norah Winifred BALDWIN; Percy Edward and Kathleen DODSWELL
28, Ivan Albert and May and Ellen WEALE

North Surrey Poultry Farm, Albert and Louise TYRELL

1932 is the last year that the poultry farm is listed in the electoral registers. In 1934 there are more even-numbered houses from 30 to 36.

This 1950 OS map shows ‘Tennis Courts’ on the east side of Edenvale Road. These were on the North Mitcham Improvement Association sports ground referred to in the 1925 street directory.

1950 OS map


Embed from Getty Images

High jump athlete Dorothy Tyler-Odam MBE moved to Edenvale Road as a young girl with her parents. From the 1925 electoral register, she lived at number 9. She died in 2014, aged 94.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Rural Way

Road off the eastern side of Streatham Road that runs towards the south east. It is next to the river Graveney, just within Mitcham, and its entrance is before Roe Bridge.

1949 OS map

The Royal Mail website shows 39 properties, all with the postcode of SW16 6PF. Even numbered houses are on the north side, with odd numbers on the south.

Possibly built in early 1920s.

Occupants shown in the 1925 street directory:-

Note that named houses are in brackets

NORTH SIDE

1, George SHORE
3, Robert MUDDLE
5, Reuben MUDDLE
(Fealdan), Mrs J. NISBET
(Pendennis), Henry DRAISEY
(Ivydene), Edward H. MURRAY
(The Nook), George SCAMMELL
(Eversdene), Arthur John G. BURTON
(Carrick), George C. PULLEN
(Wickham), Russell LUCY (timber agent)
(Rosedene), Henry William BEECHENER
(Avonhurst), Leslie MILLER

SOUTH SIDE

(The Snuggery), Mrs FEARON
4, William Fraser REYNOLDS
6, George C. COURTNEY
8, Eric P. RAY
(Camelot), Thomas F. CHAMBERS
(Padua), Francis GOBBI
14, Henry William HERRON
(Porlock), William MALLETT
(Newlyn), William John SALTER
(River Bank), Frank S. LANGHAM
(Lynton), Alfred MATTHEWS
(Brookside), Edgar YOUNG
(Burnside), John A. BAKER

Mortgages obtained from the Mitcham Urban District Council were available under the Small Dwellings Acquisition Act. In 1924, three houses, Ivydene, The Nook and Carrick had loans on them for £565 against the market value of £630.

clip from Merton Memories phot, reference Mit_Streets_P_Will_56-1, possibly when road was first built as the road hasnt been made up and the pavements haven’t been cleared.

The Swan Garage

Motor dealer and garage near the Swan pub on the western side of London Road, south of Eveline Road.

Business owned by Bertie Cyril DENDY.

He was married on 3rd August 1910 to Lilian Beatrice Mary MANSFIELD, aged 25, of 7 Spencer Road, Cottenham Park, Wimbledon. Her father is shown on the marriage certificate as Thomas Mansfield, carpenter. Bertie Dendy, also at the same address has his occupation shown as Coach Builder, the same as his father Adolphus.

The 1911 census shows him as a wheelwright:
Address: The Oakwood, London Road, Mitcham, Surrey

Adolphus DENDY, head, born 1854, aged 57, wheelwright
Frances Sarah Dendy, wife, born 1852, aged 59, married 33 years
Bertie Dendy, son, born 1881, aged 30, wheelwright
Lilian Beatrice Mary Dendy, son’s wife, born 1891, aged 20

His father Adolphus is listed in the 1915 street directory as a wheelwright at The Oakwoods, north of Oakwood Terrace. Adolphus Dendy was a District Chairman in 1907, and also landlord of the Ship pub. In the 1918 Kelly directory, Adolphus Dendy is listed as carriage & motor dealer.

From the 1925 street directory, listed in London Road going south:

Eveline villas :
10, William Arthur VLEACH
9, Ernest Alfred ARTHUR
8, Hugh ANDERSON
7, William DRAKEFORD
6, Latham Charles LATHAM

…. here is Eveline road

5, Sidney BOREHAM
3, J. W. AUSTIN & Son, provision dealers
2, Ernest REEVE, butcher
1, Miss L. FROUDE, confectioner

B. DENDY motor engineer
The Mitcham Cabinet Works (E. W. CLIFTON & C. OLDHAM, proprietors)
Swan inn, Roy DALE
B. DENDY motor engineer
Mrs. DENDY (The Oakwoods)

From the London Gazette, 2nd February, 1937:

NOTICE is hereby given that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us, the undersigned
Bertie Cyril Dendy and Arthur Henry Stanforth carrying on businees as Garage Proprietors at 174
London Road, Mitcham in the county of Surrey under the style or firm of “THE SWAN GARAGE”
has been dissolved by mutual consent as from the thirteenth day of December 1936. All debts due and owing to or by the late firm win be respectively received and paid by the said Berne Cyril Dendy.

The said business will be carried on in the future by the said Bertie Cyril Dendy.

—As witness our hands this 25th day of January 1937.

ARTHUR HENRY STAINFORTH.

BERTIE CYRIL DENDY.

Norwood News 5th May 1937 via the British Newspaper Archive

Norwood News – Friday 15th October 1937

MITCHAM’S SOLE AGENTS B. C. Dendy and Co.. Ltd., 180, London-road, Mitcham, has an advantage over other motor-dealers in Mitcham as he is the only agent in Mitcham for Morris and Ford cars. This advantage is also an advantage for prospective buyers of cars residing within easy reach of Mitcham, as one is able to see the car one wants in comfort.

Ford, of course, is known to all, as since 1903 the Ford organisation has made and sold over 25,000,000 ears. This unique record in manufacturing has only been made possible by the unusual value which Ford cars offer. The Ford “Ten” is the latest addition to Ford high-value ears, and one of the most outstanding announced for many years. It marks a new stage in the evolution of enjoyable but inexpensive motoring, offering exceptional roominess, high engineering quality. assured reliability, with remarkable economy.

His other sole agency. that of Morris cars, gives prospective buyers the opportunity of examining cars which have a reputation for fast, safe, and comfortable riding. The Morris “24” is designed in such a way that the most careful attention has been paid to those three dominating points.

The new overhead valve power unit has been thoroughly proved over an eveonsive mileage and combines surging power with the absolute reliability and smooth running for which Morris engines have been famed in the past. With a top speed of 70 miles per hour and an mildly impressive performance on the lower gears, it is more than capable of holding its own even with cars of much higher horsepower. It Is the car for the man who desires comfortable motoring.

Listed in the 1938 commercial directory as B.C. Dendy & Co., motor car agents, 174 London Road.

Henry Fowler, Last of the Lavender Growers

clip from Merton Memories photo, reference Mit_People_57-1, copyright London Borough of Merton.

Lavender grower who lived at Lavender House in Bond Road.

He had a stall at Covent Garden from 1882 to 1919, according to this article in the Hull Daily Mail of Monday 28 July 1919:-

Sweet Lavender.

Mr Henry Fowler, one of the largest dealers lavender in the country, who has large gardens at Mitcham, has retired from the Covent Garden stall which he has occupied for 37 years without a break. The first crop of lavender from Carshalton was cut on Saturday, and a few bunches were on sale in the streets.

After the First World War, the price of lavender had doubled, and was grown outside Mitcham, according to this article from 1920:

Mitcham Lavender Dearer.

The first cut of Mitcham lavender, which is ready for market a fortnight earlier this season, has been made by Mr Henry Fowler, of Lavender Nursery, Bond-road, Mitcham, known as the last of the growers. –

It is 1s 6d a bunch this season, which is more than double the pre-war price. The crop, though small, is in fine bloom. Most of it is grown just outside Mitcham, at Wallington and Carshalton.

From the West Sussex County Times – Saturday 17 July 1920.

In 1921 the price was five times that before the war, he said in this article from the Daily Herald of Monday 18 July 1921:

SWEET LAVENDER

Once Flourishing Trade Now Almost Extinct

For the first time in Mitcham’s history, the lavender season has opened without even a sprig of the sweet-smelling plant being on sale in the town.

“It doesn’t pay to handle it nowadays,” said Henry Fowler, well known at Covent Garden as “the last of the Mitcham lavender kings,” to DAILY HERALD representative, “although never do I remember such a figure it fetched in Garden yesterday — 20s. a bundle. Before the war I sold for 4s.!”

Mr. Fowler, who is 76, used to sell as much as 20 tons a season. All the “Mitcham lavender” (offshoots from the original Mitcham stock) is now grown at Carshalton, a neighbouring place, by a Beddington firm of market gardeners.

There are only about five acres left, but next year, Mr. Fowler said, there would be more grown. “And then I shall dabble in it again.”

Mitcham soil grows the finest lavender in the world, but the market gardeners say that other flowers and vegatables are more profitable. Moreover, all the land will soon commandeered for manufacturing purposes.

Distilling lavender is still a big trade in Mitcham, much of the plant coming from Hitchin, Worthing, and other places.

“It is the first time for 40 years I have never had lavender to sell,” were Mr. Fowler’s parting words.

A large lavender distillery was run by W.J. Bush & Co. Ltd.


Henry Fowler had been born around 1846 in Dunstable, Hertfordshire. When he was 35 he was a florist’s labourer according to the 1881 census, which shows him as living at number 6, Dixon’s Cottages (near the present day Gardeners Arms in London Road). In the 1911 census he is listed as a florist, aged 65, with his wife Anna 72, and daughter Nellie 39.

He died in 1925, as reported locally and in the West Sussex Gazette – Thursday 26 March 1925:

Mr. Henry Fowler, the “Lavender King,” hes died. For over 40 years he supplied Covent Garden market with big consignments of lavender. Since 1922 he had been out of the business.

Note that lavender is still grown in Carshalton.

News articles are from the British Newspaper Archives, which requires a subscription.

Byegrove Road

Road off of Colliers Wood High Street that was part of the Mitcham Urban District. Possibly named after the nearby Byegrove House, as shown in this 1865 OS map.

1865 OS map

This 1895 OS map shows houses only on the south side of the road.

1895 OS map

The OS map of 1911 shows houses have since been built on its north side.

1911 OS map

Note also that on the left is Bailey Road, which no longer exists.

From the 1911 street directory, as described from the High Street:

SOUTH SIDE
3A, William MASON shopkeeper
………Here is Bailey road………
1 George WATKINS, beer retailer
…… here is public footpath to Wandsworth ……

Croydon Rural District Council Sewage Works
(Henry James SNOOK, farm manager; John Alfred SUTTON, engineer)

NORTH SIDE
…… here is Denison road

Occupants in the 1925 street directory

East Side
2,George RIDOUT
2a,Sidney SMITH
4,Harry JOHNS
4a,Mrs RICHARDS
6,Walter Edward TRIGGS
6a,Frank GOVER
8,Frederick SUTTON
8a,Mrs ARNOLD
10,Mrs CLARKE
10a,Edwin JONES
12,William HOLLEY
12a,Ernest BLOW
14,Charles WOODS
14a,Arthur VARRALL
16,Frederick CROSBY
16a,William Charles STEWART
18,Thomas RUSSELL
18a,Harry MITCHELL
20,Frederick Joseph DENNIS
20a,William Isaac FAIR
22,William GILBERT
22a,George RANDALL
24,Thomas PRICE
24a,Henry Samuel HALL
26,Seymour SCOTT
26a,Sidney COPPERWAITE
28,Henry TIBBLES
28a,George JONES
30,Gordon James SCRUBY
30a,William BRYANT
32,Herbert Charles LEVISH
32a,Mrs FLEMING
34,Mrs KNIGHTBRIDGE
34a,Henry GUY
36,H. Sermon KNIGHTBRIDGE
36a,Alfred John SIMONS
38,Frederick William KING
38a,John SPICE
40,Aesbsell PROCKTER
40a,George Arthur WEBB
42,George PETERS
42a,Richard LUCRAFT
44,Mrs STEIDLEN
44a,Thomas LEWMAN
46,Arthur George CLARKE
46a,Ernest STAPLES
48,Mrs DREW
48a,Mrs BLOMFIELD
50,Mrs MARK
50a,Mrs WALKINGTON
52,Ernest FERRIDGE
52a,William GEORGE
54,Alfred Edward RISK
54a,Percy Harold SMITH
56,Edwin Charles WALLER
…. here is Denison rd

West Side
3a, N. SIMS,shopkeeper
…. here is Bailey Road
1,A.E. HELLEWELL ,beer retailer
5,Ernest Edward ROFFEY
7,Arthur PENTLOW
9,Edward James SPICE
11,Archibald HOLLEDGE
13,Charles HAWKINS
15,George BARRETT
17,Henry GARDNER
19,Mrs MEAD
21,Walter ROFFEY
…. here is public footpath to Wandsworth
Wandle ValleySewage Works
(Jolm Alfred Sutton, engnr)

The 1950 OS map shows the house numbering. Note 3A on the corner with Bailey Road, and that the north side are all even.

1950 OS map


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Bailey Road

Bailey Road no longer exists. It was off the south side of Byegrove Road.

It is shown on this 1950 OS map, with houses numbered odd on the south side, and even on the north. Just south off this map is the cork factory of Walter Mays Ltd.

1950 OS map

Occupants in the 1925 street directory

North Side

2,Mrs HEATHER
4,Herbert SILENCE
6,William Edwin LANG
8,George Herbert PORTER
10,John POTTER
12,Henry LUFFMAN
14,James Frederick SKELTON
16,John STANFORD
18,Frederick Samuel BATHO

South Side

1,Henry George THORPE
3,Ernest WHITE
5,William Frederick BAKER
7,Mrs. A WARWICK
9,John HARRIGAN
11,Walter MUNT
13,Charles BOYES
15,James George HUGGETT

Bailey Road is shown on this 1895 OS map:

1895 OS map

However in the 1891 electoral register, a terrace called Bayley Cottages is shown as in Byegrove Road.

Other entries in the 1891 electoral register Listed as Bayley Cottages, Byegrove Road:

Not numbered:
Edward BOWDERY

Numbered:
2, Charles BAKER
3, John LUFFMAN
7, William PHIPPS

Note the Henry LUFFMAN in the 1925 street directory.

The Merton Historical Society have a photo from Eric Montague’s slide collection of the terrace of houses north of Bailey Road. The photo was taken in 1973 looking south. It shows the blocks of flats where Bailey Road was. It can be found on the Colliers Wood collection of photos, related to his book on Colliers Wood in the Mitcham Histories series.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Shore Street

No longer exists. It was a cul-de-sac off the south side of Phipps Bridge Road (the part of which is now Liberty Avenue), and west of Willow View.

1952 OS map

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 2nd February, 1968:

HOMES MUST GO – MINISTER
Shore Street residents lose fight against demolition
Colliers Wood redevelopment plan confirmed

A GROUP of Colliers Wood residents have lost their fight to prevent their homes being
demolished in a housing redevelopment scheme.

The Ministry of Housing this week approval Merton Council’s controversial compulsory purchase order for 34 properties in the Shore Street area.

But some of the residents have gained a partial victory, for while their homes will still be demolished, they are not now considered unfit for human habitation.

Nine properties have been transferred from this category and their owners will get compensation at the higher market value instead of site value.\

‘The best solution’

And another 12 owners are to receive good maintenance payments for keeping properties, confirmed as unfit, in good condition.

At a public inquiry in October, the council claimed all but one of the houses were unfit and sought approval to remodel the whole area.

Residents claimed many of the properties were quite habitable and others could easily be improved. Demolition, they said, would not be the answer.

But the Minister has accepted his inspector’s recommendations that the demolition of all the buildings is the best solution, and has confirmed the order.

Town Clerk, Mr Sydney Astin, said this week : “In accordance with the Minister’s instructions, market value and good maintenance payments will be made, where applicable.”

The houses were described by the Medical Officer in an inspection in January, 1939:

January 28, 1939

To the Chairman and members of the Public Health Committee,
Ladies and Gentlemen,

SHORE STREET

As requested by the Committee I have made a detailed inspection of the houses on Shore Street.

There are fourteen houses, eight (1-8) situated on one side of the road and six (9-14) on the opposite side. The houses are between sixty and seventy years old. All the houses are of fairly sound construction and the outside walls have been built with a hard brick. The roofs are made of slate and are fairly sound.

The rents vary from 9s. to 10s. per week.

The front room of each house opens directly on to the pavement. There is no bad arrangement of the street, and each house has plenty of air space both front and back.

As far as the inernal arrangement is concerned there is on the ground floor a front living room, with a scullery behind, and on the first floor, a front and back bedroom. The height of the rooms varies from 7 ft. 9 ins. to 7 ft. 11 ins. In some cases the floor of the front room ground floor is of concrete, in others it is wood. The staircase in all the houses is extremely dark.

Although the houses are old they are not unfit for human habitation, and the defects which found can be remedied at a reasonable cost.

As far as I have been able to ascertain there has been only one recent occasion in which the street was flooded, and this was due to the gulleys being blocked by rubbish. In heavy storms the rain beats in under the doors of some of the houses and causes the floors to become very damp. This state of affairs could probably be remedied by raising the height of the door steps and attention to the fit of the doors. Some of the houses have back additions which make the scullery very dark, and cause a certain amount of dampness.

Two of the houses are overcrowded, and two showed the presence of vermin infestation.

The owner has always complied with any sanitary notices that have been served.

A. T. Till
Medical Officer of Health

SCHEDULE OF DEFECTS
By house number

1. Three adults, seven children. Small fractures in brick work of back wall. Slight dampness round chimney breast in back bedroom.

2. Two adults, two children. Flooring of front room ground floor requires repairing. Cracked chimney pot on front chimney stack.

3. Two adults. Rainwater pipe front of house leaking. Small repair required to pointing of brickwork of front wall.

4. Two adults, three children. Slight ground dampness in living room. Small repair required to pointing of brickwork of front wall.

5. Two adults, two children. Joint forming the interspace between the window frame and brickwork of living room defective.

6. Four adults. Flooring by door defective. Rainwater gutter and pipe at rear defective. Stone window sill of back bedroom defective. Dampness around chimney breast in back bedroom.

7. Two adults, two children. Flooring week in living room.

8. Two adults. Dampness in corner of front bedroom by parapet wall.

9. Two adults, one child. Good condition.

10. Three adults. Dampness around chimney breast back room first floor.

11. Two adults, five children over 10 years of age. Good condition.

12. One adult. Joints forming interspace between window frame and brickwork living room defective. Defective stair tread. Countless round chimney breast in back bedroom. Slight dampness above matchboarding in front room ground floor.

13. Two adults. Week flooring of front room ground floor. Stone window sill back bedroom first floor. Woodwork of windows back bedroom first floor defective.

14. Four adults. Week flooring front room ground floor. Flooring defective by cover. Rainwater gutter and pipe at rear defective. Stone window sill of back bedroom defective. Woodwork of back bedroom window defective. Dampness around chimney breast of back bedroom.

Source: Minutes of the Mitcham Borough Council, volume 5, pages 315-6.

Occupants in 1925 street directory

North Side
1 Alfred BULL
2 Gilroy M HARRINGTON
3 Charles Jesse COLES
4 Thomas ROSUM
5 Geogre NOVELL
6 James SEAGRAVE
7 Walter READ
8 Frederick John PAYNE

South Side
14 George CODD
13 Ernest Garrat REEKS
12 Mrs F PROCTOR
11 Arthur Cecil POULTON
10 Harry WARNER
9 Mrs SINEY

clip from Merton Memories photo, copyright London Borough of Merton


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Borough Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.