Category Archives: Clubs

Mitcham and District Poultry Club

Norwood News – Friday 15 August 1941

A special meeting of the Mitcham and District Poultry Club was held on Tuesday, when Mr. Barnett, of 1 Stuarts-place, tendered his resignation as secretary owing to private reasons.

The committee was reorganised, and the following officers elected:

Chairman, Mr Coulby, 24 Rewley-road, Carshalton;
vice-chairman, Mr. Garrard. 35 Pitcairn-road, Mitcham;
secretary, Mr. D A. Perry, 39 Alexandra-road, Mitcham;
assistant secretary, Mr. Kemp, 48 Steers-mead, Mitcham;
treasurer, Mrs. Perry, 39 Alexandra-road, Mitcham.

Additional committee members appointed were : Mr. Mayo, 18 Masons-place, Mitcham, and Mrs. Archer, 18 Wilson-avenue, Mitcham.

Application has been made for acceptance as members of the Scientific Poultry Breeders’ Association Ltd., and applications have been made in an endeavour to obtain permits for the purchase of various poultry appliances. It is hoped the next meeting will be held some time early next week, but in the meantime inquiries and applications for membership may be made to any of the above officers.

New members are cordially invited.

Hercules Ladies Athletic Club

From the Mitcham News and Mercury, 20th of October 1933, page 1

“Mitcham Odds and Ends”

RIFT IN THE LUTE

I am sorry to hear that trouble has arisen over the decision of the Mitcham Athletic Club at its recent annual general meeting, not to allow members under 16 years of age to vote at their meetings. This has been taken as a slight upon the young ladies who lately have flocked to the club in overwhelming numbers. Unfortunately it has led to the formation of another club, which may tend to cripple both organisations. Mr F.H. Priest, president of the Mitcham Athletic Club, informed me that every effort will be made to consolidate the Mitcham Athletic Club in the interests of young lady athletes.

HERCULES LADIES

Meanwhile, the new club, called the Hercules Ladies Athletic Club, has established its headquarters at Dahomey Road, Streatham. The officers are: Founders, Mr and Mrs R.O. Bale; committee chairman Mr R.C. Parr; honorary general secretary, ,Mr F.J.E. Meymes, 19 Crusoe Road, Mitcham; hon. Treasurer, Mrs F. Meymes; club captain, Mrs Bale; and trainer, Mr Bale. The club colours are navy blue with regulation tunic with scarlet facings. The object of the club, it is pointed out, is “furtherance of womanhood in athletics.” The club committee, in appealing to parents, states ”that Mrs O Bales (formerly Miss A.M. Stone, international runner and winner of many athletic events) is putting her whole efforts in turning their daughters into first class sport swimming, vide the club’s motto Factum non verbum (Deeds not words). “As solid foundations are essential, we feel that very careful attention given to girls under 15 years of age, will assure this being a first-class club eventually.”

THE LAVENDER MAN.

Corporal Dennis Ernest Browne

Born in 1925, in Greenwich.

His father William John Browne, had served with the RAF during World War 1. (From the Royal Air Force Muster Roll 1918, his service number was 107218)

In the 1939 Register he lived with his parents William John Browne, born 13th January 1883, a printer, lived at 81 Gorringe Park Avenue, with his wife Caroline Alice, born 4th February 1888, and his brother William J.T., born 13th December 1915, a commercial traveller.

He served with the 1/6th Battalion, The Queen’s Royal Regiment (West Surrey), service number 14654147.

He died on 8th August 1944, aged 19.

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 6th October 1944, page 1:

How Cpl. Dennis Browne
Met His Death

Was promoted on field

News of the gallant deed that resulted in the death of Corpl. Dennis Browne, youngest son of Mr and Mrs WJ Browne, Gorringe Park Avenue, Mitcham, whose death in action in Normandy was reported in the “Mercury” in August, comes this week from his company officer.

On August 8th April Browne’s company was ordered to attack an objective. The enemy withheld his fire until the Britishers were 15 yards away and then opened out with machine-gun fire.

“I saw Corpl. Browne run forward alone in an attempt to take the position single-handed. He fell two yards from the position,” writes his officer.

His officer, who recovered Corpl. Browne’s body, add “I trust that the manner of his passing will consolation be of some consideration to his parents, as one and all, from C.O. downwards paid tribute to a very gallant deed.”

Was promoted two days before

This incident occurred two days after Corpl. Browne had been promoted in the field. He had always been keen on soldiering. At 15 he joined the King’s Rifle Cadets, 16 he became a Home Guard and joined the Army before he was 18.

In civil life he was in the wire room of the “Daily Express.”

He was educated at Gorringe Park School, and was a member of Mitcham Boy Scouts.

He is commemorated at Bayeux Memorial, Calvados, France.

Commonwealth War Grave Commission casualty record

Lance Corporal George Philpott

from the Mitcham News & Mercury, 6th October, 1944, page 1:

Lance-Corporal George Philpott, Riverside Drive, London Road, Mitcham, a tailor’s cutter and trimmer at Gieve’s, Piccadilly, before the war, now wields a blacksmith’s hammer at Suez, and has Egyptian strikers, whose only language is Arabic, at his anvil.

In peace-time he was a keen motor and polo cyclist, and hoped to get a job as despatch rider when he joined the Army, but they sent him to Longmore to train as a blacksmith. Later, he worked at Wilmot, Newport and London. While working at the Albert and King George V docks London, he claims to have had a wonderful time, because he was so near home, and able to visit his father and brothers frequently.

Of his job Lance-Corporal Philpott says: ”It’s interesting work, and I quite like a change, but I shall go back to my own trade after the war. Only, maybe, If I get absent-minded, I might begin to cut clothes with a hammer and chisel.

DANGER AT THE DOCKS

“We came to the Middle East in May, 1942,” he said,” and I was posted straight to Suez, where we are now. When the push was on a detachment of us went to Mersa Matruh and Tobruk, to work on the docks there. We repaired cranes and installations destroyed by the Germans before they left. There were air attacks when we were at Tobruk and at Benghazi. Most of the troops were quartered outside the town, but we got the full benefit, because we had to stay right on the docks, and whenever a ship came in, the attacks were redoubled.”

Lance-Corporal Philpott is in charge of the blacksmith’s shop for his present Company, and has Egyptian strikers at his anvils. Language is something of a difficulty but he has picked up enough Arabic to make himself understood, and he can give measurements in Arabic. Work is hard and the climate difficult, being very hot, indeed, in summer; but pressure is less than it was when the Allies were invading Sicily. Then the Company worked long hours, and nobody got any off-day during the week.

“My Army experience has been interesting,” he says. “I have seen things I shall never forget. I do not regret my Army service for a moment.”

BROTHER THERE, TOO.

His brother, Frank, is also in the Middle East. He too was a keen motorcyclist, and was more fortunate than his brother, for he became a despatch rider. Their younger brother, Ronald is a member of Mitcham Army Cadet Corps.

KEEN CYCLIST

L-Cpl Philpott, a member of Tooting Cycling Club, was one of the club’s top scorers. He played in their bicycle Polo team and holds several medallions awarded for his part when the club won competitions. His brother, like his father, is a keen racing cyclist, and won several prizes on the road; he held the 25-mile record of the Tooting Cycling Club in 1931, his time being 1 hour 3 minutes 53 seconds.

The 1939 Register shows the occupants of 62 Riverside Drive:

James I Philpott, born 19/02/1881, Newsagent’s Warehouseman
Florence A Philpott, born 28/02/1884, housewife
George Philpott, born 31/01/1910, Uniform – Tailor’s Trimmer
Esther F Philpott, born 28/07/1911, Packer – Confectionery
Grace Philpott, born 17/06/1912, Packer – Confectionery
Gladys Philpott, born 13/07/1915, Chain Store Supervisor

Source: The National Archives; Kew, London, England; 1939 Register; Reference: RG 101/1372H

A relative on the Facebook group Mitcham History wrote “As he and his brother Frank volunteered for service, they both thought that their skills in civilain life would be put to use. Instead they were both posted to North Africa. George was trained as a blacksmith, somewhat different to a military tailor! He was posted to the London Docks to repair cranes, then was shipped out with them.”

The Barrel Golfing Society

From the Norwood News – Friday 19 June 1936

New golfing society

The social and sporting activities of a number of resident-golfing enthusiasts has led to the formation of a new golfing community under the title of “The Barrel Golfing Society” which was inaugurated on Sunday last. The membership is limited to 33, and is restricted to regular playing members on Mitcham Common. Mr R.H. Lawson is president; Mr FJ Bentley vice president; Mr T W Farley honorary treasurer; Mr WC Batchelor, 2, Langdale Avenue, Mitcham, is the honorary secretary; and the committee are vs Messrs H.W. Rigby, W. Hurley, T. Edwards, A.W.J. King and E.A. Goble.

The governing rules of the new society are somewhat unique, and full particulars are available at the club headquarters, The Blue House, Mitcham Common.

Mitcham and District Lambretta Club

Clip from Merton Memories photo reference Mit_Transport_17-1

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 19th January, 1962, page 1:

Night out for the Goons

The Mitcham Goons celebrated their fourth annual dinner at The White Hart Hotel, Mitcham.

Mr and Mrs D.C. Guy were guests of honour and Bob Hazell of Surrey Scooters, vice-president of the club, was also there.

The trophies for the annual club memorial trial were presented by Derek C. Guy, the first place being won by Harry Neal the club’s secretary, second place by Mike Austin and third place by Norman Creker.

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 8th March, 1957, page 1:

A piece of mouldy cheese fetches 3s

A piece of mouldy cheese wrapped in paper sold for 3s. on Monday.

It was a mock auction organised by Mitcham and District Lambretta Club. All the parcels were wrapped so that the bidders did not know the contents.

Other articles sold included a bottle of Mitcham lavender that raised 5s., a puncture outfit and a pinafore.

A novelty item was a cardboard replica replica of a “goon.” It was made by Mrs Margaret Griffiths, Wide Way, Mitcham.

Mrs Griffiths has also designed “goon” pennants and badges. (Goon Harry Secombe is club president.)

The auctioneer was Mr G Hall, Bramcote Avenue, Mitcham, the Club chairman. Nearly £4 was raised.

1954 : Stephen Chart becomes Mitcham Cricket Club President

Norwood News – Friday 26 February 1954

Col. Chart is president of Mitcham C C

LIEUT.-COL STEPHEN CHART, a member of Mitcham Cricket Club for 50 years, was elected club president at the annual meeting. He succeeds Mr. H. L. Gauntlett, who died last year.

Describing the cricket club as the “most important institution in Mitcham.” Col. Chart said that he had an advantage over several of his predecessors “in that I have on one or two occasions played for the club.”

During the rest of the election of officers it was mainly a case of the old bands carrying on. Reelected were E. J. Dobinson (chairman). J. H. Stainforth (secretary), S. J. Pillinger (treasurer) — for the 27th year — and B. Bullock (match secretary).

Team captains are E. J. Ide (1st XI), G. Brodie (2nd XI), T. W. instance (3rd XI) and S. L. Smith (Wednesday XI). F. Cole is team secretary.

Surprise of the elections was the appointment of the opening bowler, R. S. Culmer, as vice-captain to the first team. At the previous annual meeting Culmer had said he would not be playing regular cricket. He forecast a gradual retirement from the game, Presumably he will now appear more frequently.

Collections on the Green during the season amounted to £218 with a further £178 from the loan of deck chairs. But the rising costs of the game are still hitting the club and a campaign to recruit honorary members is being launched. Each member of the club will try to enrol two.

The Harwood Trust bat – awarded to the most improved player under 25 – went to 18-year-old Colin Morgan, the opening batsman who had an average of 62 during cricket week.