Tag Archives: Beehive Bridge

Three Kings Road

No longer exists. It was a road that was on the east side of the Three Kings Pond and connected Commonside East to Commonside West. In around 1982 it was removed and this connection was replaced by an diversion of Commonside East and a roundabout.

Source: Merton Council planning application number MER494/82, which was granted 9th September 1982 :

The diversion of Commonside East involving construction of new carriage way, construction of roundabout on Commonside West, closure of Commonside East/West junction to vehicular traffic, narrowing of part of carriageway of Commonside East and stopping up of Three Kings Road.

1953 OS map of Three Kings Road

This photo, from around 1974, of a Metropolitan Police Recruitment day shows the road on the right.

A recruitment drive showing some of the specialisations available once 2 years probation was complete. Dog unit, motorcycle unit, underwater search unit etc.

Note also the route of the footpath that connected Cold Blows to Lavender Walk. This was an ancient path connecting the west and east fields. The path is now diverted to before the start of the Beehive Bridge incline.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

79 Commonside East

Currently residential, but was a newsagents shop. In the 1954 phone book, the occupant was A.G. HENDRA, listed as confectioner & tobacconist.

This property is the left hand one of three, as shown in this photo, taken from the Beehive Bridge. To the left of number 79 is the footpath Lavender Walk.

clip from Merton Memories photo reference Mit_Transport_2-3

1955 OS map

Next door at number 85 was S. BARTON, grocers, in the 1954 phone book. In the above photo, was it called Mitcham Stores to avoid confusion with Barton’s Stores in 1, Kings Parade, Wrythe Lane, Carshalton? (Also in the 1954 phone book)

In this clip from a 1974 photo, the shop is owned by D.G. BAKEWELL

Image courtesy of Collage - The London Picture Library - http://collage.cityoflondon.gov.uk

1974 Image courtesy of Collage – The London Picture Library – http://collage.cityoflondon.gov.uk


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

1929 : Lonesome School teachers in car crash

MOTORING THRILL.

Mitcham Teachers in Fall Over Embankment.

Two young members of the teaching staff at Lonesome School, Mitcham, had an extraordinary adventure after leaving the school on Tuesday afternoon.

Shortly before five p.m. a Baby Austin saloon car in which they were riding crashed through the stout wooden fence on the eastern corner of the Bee Hive railway bridge and plunged down the very steep embankment on to the small plot of waste ground at the rear of the new houses in Spencer-road.

The car reached the bottom of the embankment, estimated to be seventeen feet in depth, right side up, fortunately.

The teachers were Miss Ivy Green, aged twenty-three, of 61, Elsted-street, Walworth, who was driving, and Miss Mary Runnacuss, aged twenty-one, of Defoe-road, Tooting. The car belonged to Miss Smythe, of 21, Tunney-road, East Dulwich, the well known and popular head mistress of Lonesome School, who was severely injured herself in a motor accident some time ago at Eastfields level crossing. She had lent her car to her two assistants for an hour while Miss Green was learning to drive. Miss Runnacuss was her instructress.
Neither of the girls was hurt in the least and scarcely suffered from shock. The only damage to the car was a smashed wind-screen.

Mr. George Mountain, of Smith’s Buildings, Commonside East, road foreman in the employ of the Urban Council, told the “Advertiser” that he saw the car crossing the bridge as a motor lorry was ascending from Grove-road. “The motorists,” he said, “evidently caught sight of the lorry as they turned into Grove-road, made a big swerve to avoid it and crashed through the fence doing so. If their car had struck the lamp-post inside the fence it must have turned turtle. I rushed to help the girls and thought they must certainly be seriously injured, but to my great astonishment both were calmly sitting in the car, and actually smiling! They displayed great nerve and coolness all through.”

Another witness said Miss Green remarked : ” I am glad the old ‘bus did not turn over at any rate.”

Half a dozen men, with Mr. Mountain, assisted the girls to get the car out of the “rough” into the narrow passage between the end house occupied-by Mr. and Mrs. Hayne, No. 1. Spencer-road, and the bottom of the embankment. The girls then drove it away. Miss Green gaily waving her hand to her helpers as she left!

A larger car could not have been got out of the well formed by the embankment and the houses, except with the aid of a crane.

Both teachers returned to duty at Lonesome School next morning, but the head mistress had to drive a motor cycle instead of her Austin seven.

Mitcham Advertiser, 17th October, 1929, page 6