Tag Archives: 1954

Morfax Social Club Sports Ground

A sports ground that included a club pavilion that was east of the Corporation Cottages, opposite the Goat pub on Carshalton Road. It was last used by the factory Morfax, which was in Willow Lane.

Its address was Sports And Social Club Of Morfax, Carshalton Road, Mitcham CR4 4HN

This OS map from 1954 shows the outline of the pavilion building and the extent of the ground eastwards towards the railway line.

1954 OS map

Bing Maps has an aerial view of what is left of the clubhouse and ground.


There are 7 Planning applications on Sutton Council’s website:

90/P0448 : Granted 26 Jun 1990
Erection of single storey rear lounge extension to clubhouse.

86/P1340 : Granted 10 Mar 1987
Erection of changing rooms.

MER/1286/85 : Granted 4 Apr 1986
Erection of extension to existing club room.

MER/745/85 : Granted 20 Sep 1985
Extension of changing rooms.

MER/920/84 : Granted 31 Jan 1985
Erection of extension to club building involving demolition of existing buildings, to provide new servery, food preparation and beer storage areas.

MER/469/81 : Granted 13 Jan 1983
Retrospective application to erect a single-storey building for use in connection with the football club.

MER/468/81 : Granted 29 Sep 1981
Retrospective applcation for the erection of a standing encosure for spectators on northern site of the Fisher Football Club, Carshalton, Mitcham.

415 London Road

A block of 3 shops with flats above numbered 415a, 415b and 415c on the east side of the London Road, south side of Tramway Path, near Mitcham tramstop.

1954 OS map

In 1959: 415b was grocer Gaybell’s, and in 1961 it was Berry’s.

In the 1971 phone book:

Robert Brooker, greengrocer, 415a London Road, telephone 01-648 5237
Cain Brothers, butchers, is listed at 415 London Road, but doesn’t give the letter.

415c changed from a hairdressers to a tattoo parlour in 2017 according to planning application 17/P0585

Franklin Crescent

A crescent, that is nearly a square, road with an island centre, off the north side of Sherwood Park Road in the eastern part of Mitcham. Possibly built in the early 1930s. Houses are numbered odd, clockwise from 1 to 71, and even on the island in the centre, also clockwise from 2 to 28.

The Royal Mail postcode website says that there are two postcodes used in this road : odd numbered houses are CR4 1ND, while even numbered ones are CR4 1NH.

Photo of the front of no. 10 taken in 1983.

Photo of the rear of no. 10 taken in 1983. Vehicle access to the back was possible and this photo shows a garage on the left.

Photo of the back garden of no. 10 taken in 1983.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Private Alfred Robert Allen

Alfred Robert Allen lived with his parents Alfred William and Elsie May Allen at 4 Manton Way, Mitcham. On his gravestone, his parents called him Bob:

In memory of Bob.
His smiling face is with us
Till we meet again,
Mum and dad

Manton Way was a short road, with only four houses at the time. It was off the west side of Galpins Road at the eastern end of the then Borough of Mitcham, with its boundary to Croydon. On the eastern side of Galpins Road were tennis courts and playing fields. At the southern end of Galpins Road was Mitcham Common.

Manton Way was at the edge of the Pollards Hill Golf course, and Bob Allen may well have crossed it on his way to Sherwood Park School, half a mile to the west.

Bob Allen died, aged 19, on 22nd January 1944, while serving with the 6th Battalion of the Lincolnshire Regiment which took part in the landings at Salerno, in September 1943, in the Allied Invasion of Italy.


Sources

Commonwealth War Grave Commission:

Private
ALLEN, ALFRED ROBERT

Service Number 14280788

Died 22/01/1944

Aged 19

6th Bn.
Lincolnshire Regiment

Son of Alfred William and Elsie May Allen, of Mitcham. Surrey.

Ancestry.com. UK, Memorial Books WWI and WWII, 1914-1945.
Original data: Sayers, William Charles Berwick, ed. Croydon and the Second World War: The Official History of the War Work of the Borough and Its Citizens from 1939–1945, Together with the Croydon Roll of Honour. Croydon, England: The Croydon Corporation, 1949.

Lincoln Regiment

Born 29th October 1924, in Fulham. Lived at 387a London Road, Croydon. Educated Sherwood Park School, Mitcham. Clerk. Died in Italy, 22nd January 1944. Buried Military Cemetery, Minturno.

Ancestry.com. England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1995

In his will he left £241 1s. 8d. to his mother Elsie May Allen.

The National Archives; Kew, London, England; 1939 Register; Reference: RG 101/1376C

No. 4 Manton Way
Alfred William Allen, born 20th May 1894, (builders) scaffolder labourer.
Elsie May Allen, born 17th September 1894, housewife.

Maps

1940 OS map

1954 OS map

When the Pollards Hill Golf Course was developed for housing after WW2, Manton Way was extended and renamed Berkshire Way. Other roads in this development were named after counties.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Kempat Ltd.

Listed in the 1954 phone book as Kempat Ltd., Brassieres, Girdles, 1 Block James Estate, Western Road, telephone Mitcham 1664.

Presumably named after its managing director Vivian Fitch-Kemp, who named in a 1945 court case involving overcharging on the sale of bras. Mr Fitch-Kemp patented in 1934 a bra with bust support:

U.S. Patent No. 2,104,867
BUST SUPPORT
Vivian Fitch Kemp. London, England
Application August 19, 1935, Serial No. 36,909
In Great Britain August 30, 1934.

A bust support comprising two separate breast pockets; a single pivotal connection between said pockets situated above the line corresponding with the maximum chest expansion; a resilient coupling between said pockets situated
below said line so that said pockets can move relatively about said pivotal connection to permit the girth measurement below the pivotal point to vary; shoulder straps respectively secured at one end to the upper edges of said breast pockets and at the other end to the back of said bust support and means for securing said bust support on the wearer.

Mr Vivian Fitch-Kemp, born 13 Jul 1899, served in the Grenadier Guards at aged 17 in 1917. He died in 1958.

The newspaper articles below are via the British Newspaper Archive

Adverts

Norwood News – Friday 02 January 1953

Kempat Ltd. have a few vacancies for school-leavers and teen-agers who wish to become sewing machinists; frequent rises, and when fully trained (approx. 2 years) over £6 p.w. can be earned. no Saturdays, music, canteen, also ex-employees welcomed. Apply Kempat Ltd. James Estate. Western-rd.. Mitcham.

Norwood News – Friday 22 February 1946

EXPERIENCED machinists reqd.; good wages; our best machinists earn up to £3 12s. 6d., 44 hours, no Saturdays; music while you work; willing to train inexperienced applicants. Apply Kempat Ltd., “M” Block, James Estate (opposite Gas Works), Western-rd., Mitcham.

Company ceased trading in 1962, as stated in the
London Gazette, Publication date:20 August 1965 Issue:43743 Page: 8015

Name of Company: KEMPAT LIMITED.
Nature of Business: Ceased trading on 27th March 1962 as LINGERIE MANUFACTURERS.
Address of Registered Office: Baltic House, Mount Stuart Square, Cardiff.
Liquidator’s Name and Address: Paul Francis Spurway, of Baltic House, Mount Stuart Square, Cardiff.
Date of Appointment: 7th August 196S.

J.H. Peters, Optician

c. 1962 clip from Merton Memories photo reference Mit_Streets_P_Will_77-2

Addresses taken from phone books:

1959 : 4A Western Road, MIT 7114
1966 : 4 Western Road, 01-648 7114
1981 : 6 Fair Green Parade, 01-648 7114.

J.H. Peters was James Henry Peters, the marathon runner known as Jim Peters.

From the Liverpool Echo – Wednesday 13 January 1999

Marathon hero Peters dies

MARATHON legend Jim Peters, who caught the imagination of the public at the 1954 Empire Games in Canada when he staggered around the last lap, has died aged 80.

Peters entered the Vancouver stadium around three miles ahead of the next competitor but dehydration had taken its toll and as the crowd rose to acclaim him he faltered and began to stagger.

He fell six times and his anguished English team-mates at trackside could not help for fear that he would be disqualified if he received any assistance.

They were finally able to go to his aid when it was clear he was not going to cross the finishing line of the race eventually won by Scotland’s Joe McGhee.

But his courageous efforts over the final few yards made an unforgettable sight which was etched in the minds of millions by Movietone News.

He ran a world’s best time in the marathon each year from 1952 to 1954 but he was more celebrated in that glorious defeat than in his victories during the fifties.

Peters quit athletics after the Games – “It cost me my killer instinct” he said – but the image of his heroic bid for a gold medal 45 years ago still lives on.

David Bedford, the international race director of the London Marathon, said: “Jim was a class runner when marathon running, unlike today, was unfahsionable.

Plimsoles

“He trained harder than most – often 100 miles a week – and believed in the work ethic with his thousands of miles run in plimsoles.

“My first memories of him were from newspaper pictures showing him collapsing when in sight of the finish.”

Bedford, the former 10,000 metres world record holder, added: “Few athletes push themselves to such exhaustion as Jim did at those Games. He was unique.”