Tag Archives: 1910

Carshalton Road

Road that is the start of the A237 and runs south from the junction with Commonside West, Cedars Avenue and Croydon Road, heading towards Carshalton.

On the west side there is a junction with Cranmer Road and Willow Lane, and on the right just after this is the entrance road to Mitcham Junction railway station and the Mitcham Golf Club. The road goes over the railway and tram lines on a bridge that was rebuilt and widened in the mid 1950s. On the west side of the road and part of the southern slope of the bridge is an access road leading to Aspen Gardens. Further south from here, and set back from the western side of the road is a line of houses that were originally called Rumbold Villas and Tramway Terrace. They are separated by two roads Drake Road and Arney’s Lane. At Beddington Corner is the Goat pub on the corner with Goat Road.

After Beddington Corner, the road is now called London Road and the A237 continues to the A23 at Coulsdon.

Carshalton Road at junction with Croydon Road. The house was one of the Blue Houses. From a Percy Mayhew postcard, from Merton Memories, photo reference Mit_19_1-19

The guide post (marked G.P.) that is on the south side of the tram line in this 1910 OS map is the one seen in the photo.

1910 OS map

The junction with Croydon Road was changed to a roundabout in 1955.

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 24th February 1955

ROUNDABOUT

Work is to start soon on making a traffic roundabout at the busy junction of Croydon Road with Carshalton Road, on Mitcham Common.

The Transport Minister has approved a grant of up to £4,427 towards the cost of the roundabout. Coun. D.J. Hempstead, Highways Committee chairman, said last week that it was hoped that work would be speedily undertaken.

The bridge over the railway line was widened at the same time, the work having been started in 1939 but was interrupted by the war.

On the east side of Carshalton Road, south of the railway station, was a WW2 anti-aircraft gun site. It was cleared in the early 1960s.

1955 OS map showing the Gun Site.

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 13th July 1962:

At last – Gunsite is to go

One of Mitcham’s biggest eyesores, the Gun Site, Carshalton Road, Mitcham Common, is at last to be cleared at a cost of about £13,000.

Work on clearing the site is expected to start in about two months time.

The Ministry have approved a tender of £10,800 submitted to them from the Conservators and have further agreed to bear the cost of replacing trees on the site.

WELCOMED

A further cost of £2,000 fees will be included in the work.

This news is welcomed not only by the Conservators but by Mitcham Council and the public.

The Gun Site is one of the few remaining war relics in Mitcham and local people have been pressing for years to clear it.

The conservators hope to replace it with a grass landscape with trees.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

St Peter & St Paul Roman Catholic Primary School

School whose address is Cricket Green, Mitcham, CR4 4LA. Its entrance from that road is between the Mary Tate Almshouses and number 40.

1954 OS map

The road had previously been called Lower Green East until 1944, when it was renamed Cricket Green.

According to 1 The Cricket Green, page 113 :

The Roman Catholic primary school St Peter and St Paul was rebuilt in 1974, replacing the original chapel school building erected in 1861 on land given by William Simpson Jr.

This OS map from 1910 shows the outline of the school building, its entrance being between the Almshouses and the Britannia pub shown as P.H.

1910 OS map

Kelly and Post Office directories from the late 19th and early 20th centuries state that the school was probably built around 1867, for 80 children. It’s worth noting that the Catholic church was built later than the school, in 1889. The directory of 1912 said that the school was enlarged in 1897, for 148 children, and had an average attendance of 123. The 1912 directory said that the school was enlarged again in 1908 for 180 children. Also in that directory was a list of the six school managers, and their clerk:

James Douglas DREWETT, Ravensbury, Upper Green, Mitcham
Bernard HAYWARD, Post office, London Road, Mitcham
Rev. Bernard W. KELLY, St. Anthony’s Hospital, London Road, North Cheam
Berrill Henry MAGUIRE, The Beeches, London Road, Lower Mitcham
Rev. Joshua POOLEY, The Presbytery, Cranmer Road, Mitcham
William F. J. SIMPSON, Park place, Commonside West, Mitcham

Clerk to Managers, William James DICKISSON, Trent House, 87 Melrose Avenue, Mitcham

The directories also gave the head mistress in charge of the school, as shown in this table, where the years are the directory entries.

YEARS Name
1874 and 1878 Miss Mary A. PARKS
1880 Miss Mary CONWAY
1891 Miss Mary Ann RIGBY
1896 Miss Elizabeth BRYCE
1898, 1901 and 1902 Miss DAWSON
1911, 1912, 1913 and 1915 Miss Annie DERHAM
1918 Miss Elizabeth DAVEY

Miss Davey started teaching in 1887, according to this news article from 1933 which reported on her retiring from head mistress.

A WORTHY TEACHER

Miss Davey, the esteemed head mistress of Mitcham Catholic Day School, is retiring to well-merited leisure after 46 years of teaching. She has put the best years and the best efforts of her life into this school, and she has the consolation of knowing that she has not spent herself in vain. When she leaves at the end of February she will take with her the united good wishes of the priest, the parents, and the children for her devoted service.

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 6th January, 1933, page 1.


The name of the school in the directories was either the Lower Mitcham Catholic School, or the Mitcham Catholic Day School as in the 1933 news item.

Listed in the 1971 phone book as S.S. Peter & Paul R.C. Primary, Cricket Green, telephone 01-648 1459.


Merton Memories Photos

Catholic chapel that was demolished when school was rebuilt in 1974
1970 school playground
undated colour photo of school from Cricket Green

Eric Montague Slides
A 1966 photo of the Sheila Shaw horse riding school, at number 40 next door to the Catholic school, shows part of the entrance and its notice board, that is headed ‘Ss Peter & Paul’s Catholic School’.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

St Marks Road

Road that today runs eastwards from London Road, where the Baths used to be, then curves south to the end of Majestic Way and heads east again to Lammas Avenue.

Originally called Killick’s Lane until the St Marks church was built in 1898. It was named after Samuel Killick, a local builder who had his yard there. Amongst the various local buildings, his name is mentioned on the blue plaque at the parish vicarage, which reads:

This building, erected by Samuel Killick in 1826 for the Rev. Richard Cranmer, replaces an earlier vicarage.

The fanlight and the unusual pattern of window glazing bars are interesting features.

1910 OS map

Numbers 1 to 7 on the north side of St Marks Road at the London Road end was known as York Place.

The 1911 street directory shows two lines of houses both called St Mark’s Villas. The first is a terrace of 4 houses to the west of the school, and the second a group of 8 houses as 4 semi-detached houses, numbered from 1 to 8 from the corner with Lansdell Road. Below are the occupants from this directory, as described from London Road towards Eastfields:

NORTH SIDE

1, John K. HARVEY, chemist
2, John Samuel WRIGHT, dining rooms
3, George YORK, undertaker
4, James PRICE, hair dresser
5, William WHITTINGTON, tobacconist
6, W.A.MARTIN, butcher
7, Mrs S. RIMMEL, grocer

STAIR COTTAGES:

1, John TAYLOR
2, William Jesse LUNT
3, Frederick BURTON
4, Albert Edward BLAND
5, William TYLER
6, William LAWRENCE

ST. MARK’S VILLAS:

4, John SUDDS
3, John William GILMORE
2, John William MONKS
1, George WHITTINGHAM

St. Mark’s Sunday School
Walter JORDAN (School house)
Council Schools

ST. MARK’S VILLAS:

8, Frederick WHITE
7, Alfred R. CHEAL
6, Charles Henry J SIVIOUR
5, Noel Austin HARVEY
4, George William LAWRENCE
3, Henry BENNETT
2, Walter BLACKSTONE
1, William MATTHEWS

…. here is Lansdell Road

SOUTH SIDE
RAVENSBURY COTTAGES:
8, Thomas CLARKE
7, Charles TARRANT
6, Henry DRINKWATER
5, Mrs ROBERTS
4, Edward BURTON
3, Mrs E. KILBY

Alfred NASH & Sons, wheelwrights

George Arthur MIZEN
F.L. & A.G. MIZEN, market gardeners
St. Marks Church

Between Stair’s Cottages and the School House, the 1922 electoral register shows two terraces: South View Cottages and South Place, each with four dwellings. The order shown in the register is repeated here.

SOUTH VIEW COTTAGES
1, John William and Eva Jessie GILMORE
2, Alfred and Bathsheba OLDMEADOW
3, John and Betsy WADDINGTON
4, David and Lily JONES

SOUTH PLACE
4, John JORDAN; John William and Kate HAWKINS
3, William Charles and Kate COLLYER
2, Alfred, Mary and Alfred junior COUSALL
1, Ernest Edward and Elizabeth Lucy JONES

In the 1925 street directory, all the houses have been renumbered.

Stairs Cottages from 6 to 1 were renumbered 15 to 25 St Marks Road.

South View Cottages 1 to 4 were renumbered 29 to 35 St Marks Road, see 1925 directory below, and South Place from 4 to 1 were renumbered 37 to 43.

The School House became number 47, occupied by Frederick, Alice and Frederick Henry NEWSOM.

Houses named Doniford became number 59 and Astroea became 61.

NORTH SIDE
Fair green:

1, John K. HARVEY M.P.S., chemist
3, William SCRATCHLEY, dining rooms
5, George YORK, undertaker
7, H. TEDDER, hair dresser
9, William WHITTINGTON, tobacconist
11, A. BACON, hosier
13, S. & E. RIMMEL, grocers
15, Edward Charles STEVENS
17, William MERSH, boot repairer
19, Mrs BURTON
21, Frederick WELLER
23, William WELLER; Miss WELLER, pianoforte teacher
23 (back of) Thomas WELLER, cartage contractor
25, Herbert Fras. Joe SMITH
29, John William GILMORE
31, Alfred OLDMEADOW
33, John WADDINGTON
35, David JONES
37, John William HAWKINS
39, William Charles COLLYER
41, COUSALL & Sons, coal merchants
43, Alfred COUSALL

St Mark’s Parish Room
Upper Mitcham Girls’ School (Surrey Education Committee)

47, Frederick NEWSOM, school keeper
49, Rd. TOWNSEND, coal merchant
49, CARBONIUS Co. compresses carbon manufacturers

59, Henry William AYRES
61, Herbert CORNELL
63, (Sunbury) James LAW
65, (Tolworth) Miss SHEPHERD
67, (Belmont) Frederick SAWYERS
69, (Ardley) Mrs SELLAR
71, (Tongham) A. WARE
73, (Colyton) Alfred CRAIG
75, (Abinger) F. LITTLE
77, John WHALEBONE

83, Frederick WHITE
85, Alfred Robert CHEAL
87, W.L. WHITELEY
89, Mrs A.M. BENNETT
91, Robert J. WELCH
93, Harry BENNETT, insurance agent
95, Walter BLACKSTONE
97, William MATTHEWS

SOUTH SIDE

St. Mark’s Church

…. here is Baker’s Lane

(Maycroft) James Ernest PELLING
(Granville) William W. ORVES
(Kenwood) Charles EVELYN
(Glan-y-Mor) George MARRIN
34, William Henry BEWEN
32, (Homestead) Robert WILSON
30, HUDSON & BLAKE, automobile engineers
28, Oliver BROWN Ltd., varnish manufacturers
26, (Home Close) Charles LACK
24, Edgar HUME
22, Alfred REES
20, Mrs F. BENNETT
16, James DREWETT
14, Mrs MILLS
12, Miss RUFF
10, Edward BURTON
8, Stephen TAYLOR; Henry DRINKWATER
4, Mrs TARRANT
2, Thomas CLARK

Note that at no. 13, S. & E. RIMMEL, grocers, was also listed in the 1911 directory at the same address (when it was no.7) and Sarah E. Rimmel, grocers, was listed in the 1938 commercial directory.

Charles LACK was the son of Hannah LACK who ran the drapers at 4 High Street, Mitcham. With his wife Emily he ran the drapers at no. 2 next door. (From a descendant who made a comment about this on the Facebook Mitcham History group.)

The St Mark’s Parish Room was originally a ‘School Church’ whose appointed mission clergyman in 1891 was the Reverend F.J. LANSDELL whose name is the origin of Lansdell Road.

This OS map from 1952 shows the houses numbered as in the 1925 directory:

1952 OS map

Note that no.s 1 to 43 and the St Marks Parish Room have now gone and is where the pedestrian Majestic Way is today, and that no.s 27 to 35 were set back from the road, this is where the Morrison supermarket is now, and between the supermarket and the school is where St Marks Road today diverts north and west through where the Mitcham Baths was.

Between the school and no. 59 is where Armfield Crescent is today, and between 77 and 83 is now Bedfont Close.

On the south side, the paint works at 28 have gone, and that is where Chalkley Close is today. Number 26 is owned by the Royal British Legion and hosts the Poppy Club. Number 30 is still there.


Adverts

undated ad for GM Paynter at 13 St Marks Road


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Greenview, 6 Cricket Green

House at no. 6 Cricket Green, which is next door to the cricket pavilion and was built in 1903 for Lt. Col. Stephen Chart, son of Robert Masters Chart.

clip from 1910 postcard on Merton Memories, photo reference Mit_Streets_LOV_LOW_41-11

From the Mitcham Cricket Club Yearbook of 1955, page 61, when he was the President of the Mitcham Cricket Club:

Col. Chart recalls the story of the two trees standing opposite his house which obscured the view across the Green. By arrangement, these trees were removed by permission of the Conservators and two new trees were supplied by Mr. R. M. Chart and planted by him at a site opposite the Town Hall, outside the boundary of the cricket ground, where they flourish to this day.

R. M. Chart. J.P., father of the President, was at that time secretary of the Green Protection Society, a body which was formed about 1875, “… to preserve the Green from coconut shies and grazing horses “.

It was during his term of office in 1894 that the Surrey Club contributed £25, half the cost, towards a better system of drainage on the Green. In dry weather in the Summer the
direction of the drains can be clearly seen against the background of dry grass. Fred Gale, who was a great supporter of Mitcham cricket had the Green “Bush drained” some years
previously.

Lilian Road

Road that runs in a southwesterly direction from Greyhound Terrace and was in of the Mitcham Urban District, but is now considered as in Streatham.

This OS map of 1952 shows the boundary line running through Leonard Road to the west, and Greyhound Line to the north.

1952 OS map

Houses are numbered odd on the east side, and even on the west side, ascending from north to south.

At number 1A, on the north east corner with Greyhound Terrace, the pub called The Mitcham Mint opened in 1968. It had previously been an off-license.

Next are two terraces, numbers 1 to 11 and 13 to 21. These can be seen on this 1910 OS map:

1910 OS map

As this area is shown on the 1897 OS map as nurseries, with no roads laid out, it is likely that this road was built around 1900 to 1910.

Note that on this 1910 map, Greyhound Terrace is shown as Manor Road, which continued along the present Rowan Road to Manor Road to the Common. The name of the road signified it being the boundary of the manor. Parts of that road were renamed in 1926 when it became necessary to renumber the houses.

On the west side of the road, houses numbered 28 to 38 and 42 to 54 appear to have been built around 1910. The current numbers 49 and 42 were built in 2008, see planning application 08/P0773.

Stoker Alfred George Smith

He was born 9th January 1910, and was baptised on 6th March at the Mitcham parish church. In the 1911 census he is shown as living with his parents William John and Martha Ann Smith, both aged 44, at 8 Belgrave Road.

He married 6th June 1931 to Alice Louisa Ferridge at the parish church in Church Road. He was 21, a bricklayer. She was also 21 years old. They both lived at 6 Seaton Road.

Marriage Banns

The 1939 Register shows them living at 20 Dalton Avenue.

He served as a stoker on the H.M.S. Tetcott from December 1941. This was a Type 2 frigate escort ship in Mediterranean. It was anchored outside Malta when Malta was badly bombed.

Sources:
Birth : Surrey History Centre; Woking, Surrey, England; Surrey Church of England Parish Registers
Marriage Banns : Surrey History Centre; Woking, Surrey, England; Reference Number: 3477/4
1939 Register : The National Archives; Kew, London, England; 1939 Register; Reference: RG 101/1373F

Mitcham Post Offices

Eric Montague said in his book Mitcham Histories : 12 Church Street and Whitford Lane, page 107, that Mitcham’s post office had occupied 5 locations, as listed below:

1st : at Westhall’s grocery shop in the Broadway

The 1855 directory shows the postal services available:

It lists Joseph WESTALL as grocer and cheesemonger as well as the post office receiving house in Lower Mitcham.

2nd : in a small shop near Mitcham Station

This photo from 1895 shows part of the words ‘Post Office’ above the shop.

clip from Merton Memories, photo reference Mit_Public_Services_18-2, copyright London Borough of Merton

3rd : a purpose built building in the Broadway

The words ‘Post Office’ can be seen etched in the windows on the building on the right in this photo of around 1910:

clip from Meton Memories, photo reference Mit_streets_Lon_38-25, copyright London Borough of Merton

According to Eric Montague in his book Mitcham Histories : 4 Lower Mitcham, pages 127-8, this post office was

erected in about 1900 … a three-storeyed building … its rather fussy facade including false timber framing to simulate an Elizabethan structure.”

4th : Post Office and Telephone Exchange building on the corner of London Road and Elmwood Road

Built around 1920, shown here in this 1953 photo:

clip from Merton Memories photo, reference Mit_Streets_Lon_38-46, copyright London Borough of Merton

5th : Langdale Parade

In 1961 the post office moved to Langdale Parade in the Fair Green. The telephone exchange building remains.

Currently, in 2019, the Langdale Parade post office has moved to a smaller shop nearby at number 5:

Post Office at no. 5 Langdale Parade. Photo taken 23rd April 2019