Category Archives: Churches

1896 Street Directory

Agriculture
Benevolent Institution
Board Schools
Churches
Clubs, Societies etc.
Description of Mitcham
Land area and population statistics
Landowners
Manors
Missions
Parochial Officers and Public Institutions
Places of Worship
Railway Stations
Schools


Description of Mitcham

… (in Domesday Book called “ Michelham ”) is a parish and extensive village on the river Wandle and the Reigate road, with a station called Mitcham junction on the London, Brighton and South Coast railway; the Wimbledon and West Croydon line forms a junction here with the above line, and has a station at Lower Mitcham;

Distances to London and Croydon

it is 9 miles south-west from Westminster bridge and 3 north-west from Croydon ;

Divisions and Districts

the parish is in the North Eastern division of the county, Wallington hundred, Croydon union, petty sessional division and county court district, rural deanery of Beddington, archdeaconry of Kingston and diocese of Rochester, and is under the jurisdiction of the Metropolitan police. The village is lighted with gas by a company, and supplied with water from works at Ditton, the property of the Lambeth Water Co.

Churches

The church of SS. Peter and Paul, rebuilt in 1821, is a building of flint, covered with cement, in the Perpendicular style, and consists of chancel, nave, aisles, north and south porches and an embattled tower on the north-east, with pinnacles and containing 8 bells: there are 1,100 sittings. The register dates from the year 1558. The living is a vicarage, average yearly value from tithe rent-charge £356, net income £500, with residence, in the gift of William Simpson esq. and held since 1859 by the Rev. Daniel Frederic Wilson M.A. of Wadham College, Oxford, and surrogate.

Christ Church is an ecclesiastical parish, formed August 10, 1875, out of the parish of Mitcham: the church, in Church road, is a building of white brick with stone facings, in the Gothic style, and consists of chancel, nave of three bays, north aisle, south porch and a western tower with shingled spire, containing 6 bells. The register dates from the year 1876. The living is a vicarage, gross yearly value £400, with residence, in the gift of the widow of William John Harris esq. and held since 1876 by the Rev. Francis Stewart Legg M.A. of Emmanuel College, Cambridge.

The Catholic chapel, dedicated to SS. Peter and Paul, and erected in 1889, has 320 sittings. Here is also a Congregational chapel with 350 sittings, and a Free Methodist chapel,erected in 1882 and seating 250 persons, also a Baptist chapel, seating 200 persons.

A Cemetery of 23 acres was formed in 1883 at a cost of £2,800 ; it has one mortuary chapel, and is under the control of the Parish Council, acting as a Burial Board.

Miss Tate’s Almshouses, on Lower Mitcham green, built and endowed in 1829, are for twelve females above 55 years of age ; the endowment is in £5,800 Consols; other charities, producing £130 yearly, are for distribution.

The fair is held yearly, on the 12th, 13th and 14th of August.

Sir Walter Raleigh lived at Mitcham; Dr. John Donne, dean of St. Paul’s in 1620, was also a resident. Gorringe Park is the residence of the widow of William John Harris esq.

Manors

The manors are four in number, viz : — Biggin and Tamworth, Ravensbury, Mitcham and Fauxhail. The first two are held by the Conservators of Mitcham Common, Mitcham manor by W. F. J. Simpson, and Fauxhail by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners ; these last two have assigned their rights over Mitcham Common to the Conservators.

Landowners

The principal landowners are Mrs. Harris, G. P. Bidder, John Watney and W. F. J. Simpson, esqrs. and the trustees of the late Rev. H. W. Sibthorp.

Agriculture

The soil, a rich black mould with gravel subsoil, is laid out partly in market gardens and partly for medicinal plants, such as roses, rhubarb, liquorice, lavender, mint, camomile, poppies, peppermint, wormwood and aniseed; some of these are used for the manufacture of cordials and perfumes, particularly peppermint water, oil of lavender and rose water.

There are numerous mills on the river Wandle.

Land area and population statistics

The area is 2,893 acres of land and 22 of water; rateable value, £55,392, and the population in 1871 was 6,498, in 1881 : 8,960, and in 1891 : 12,127, including 914 in the Holborn Union Workhouse and 518 in the Holborn Union Workhouse Industrial School (SS. Peter and Paul district in 1891 was 9,325; Christ Church district in 1891 was 2,802).

Parochial Officers and Public Institutions

MITCHAM PARISH COUNCIL.

Chairman Thomas Allen, Grove road
William Catt, London road, Lower Mitcham
John R. Chart, Upper Mitcham
Charles Dungate, Colliers wood, Mitcham
Stephen Gregory, Merton lane
Charles M. Hallward, Lower green
Harbour William, 6 Park villas, Park road
F. Jones, Brenley, Tamworth park
John M. Leather, Eastfields
Alfred Mizen, Eastfields
Ernest E. Mizen, Eastfields
Rev. Robert Richman, Douglas house, High st
John Stickings, Railway cottages, Lower Mitcham
The Rev. Daniel Frederic Wilson M.A. The Vicarage, Mitcham
Churchwardens, H. Rutter & T. P. Harvey
Overseers, William Catt, E. E. Mizen, Thomas Francis, William Harbour & S. Gregory
Vestry Clerk & Clerk to the Parish Council, Robert M.Chart F.S.I. Vestry hall, Mitcham

CROYDON RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL,
Vestry hall, Lower green, Mitcham.

ELECTED MEMBERS FOR MITCHAM.

Mizen Edward Johnson, jun. Oakleigh, Eastfields, Mitcham
Pitt Mrs. Priscilla, Berkeley house, Mitcham
Simpson W F. J. Park place, Mitcham
Tomlin Francis, Upper green, Mitcham
Clerk to Rural District Council, James Wilson, 49 London road, Croydon
Consulting Surveyor to the Council, R. M. Chart F.S.I
Surveyor, Charles Law Green C.E
Surveyor’s Assistant, James Heath
Collector of Poor Rates, Samuel Love, 13 Glebe villas, Mitcham
Medical Officer & Public Vaccinator, No. 6 District, Croydon Union, Edward Marshall
Medical Officer of Health, Croydon Union & Rural District Council, L. W. Darra Mair M.D., D.P.H. 49 London road, Croydon & Fieleside, Beddington lane, Beddington
Registrar of Births, Deaths & Marriages & Relieving & Vaccination Officer, Frederick Garniss Ebbutt, Lower green
Metropolitan Police Station (W Division), Causeway, Lower Mitcham, Station-Sergeant George Pomeroy, in charge & 4 section sergeants & 19 constables
Merton Fire Brigade, High street, Colliers wood, Merton; Charles E. S. Bill, capt. ; Frederick James Chadwick, supt
Mitcham Fire Brigade Station, Lower green, George Haselden, superintendent
Collector of Taxes,Daniel Sewell, Upper green
Sanitary Inspector for the Rural District Council of Croydon, Levi White, 10 King’s road, Upper Mitcham Holborn Union Workhouse, for 1,052 in¬mates, Western road; T. W. Norman, master ; Mrs. G. Norman, matron ; Rev. Sydney Jackson, chaplain ; Oscar Berridge Shelsweli L.R.C.P.Lond.,M.R.C.S.Eng. medical officer
Croydon Rural District Council Sewage Works Pumping Station, Byegrove road, Henry James Snook, manager
Turncock, H.J.Schneider, 2 Finboro’ rd.Tooting

Places of Worship

with times of Services.

SS. Peter & Paul’s Church, Church rd. Rev. Daniel Frederic Wilson M.A. vicar; 8.30 & 11 a.m. & 3.30 & 7p.m.; thurs. 7.30p.m.; saints’ days, 4 p.m

Christ Church, Church road, Merton, Rev. Fras. Stewart Legg M.A. vicar ; 11 a.m. & 7 p.m.; wed. 7.30 p.m.; saints’ days, 4p.m

School Church (St. Mark’s Mission District), Rev. W.M.C. McAllister B.A. Radstock house, Cedars avenue, mission clergyman; 8 & 11 a.m. & 7 p.m

SS. Peter & Paul, Catholic, Causeway, Lower Mitcham, Rev. John Warner ; 7.30 & 10.30 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; daily, 8 a.m

Baptist Chapel, Clarendon grove, Upper Mitcham, Rev. J. Thorold Figg, 3 Sandown villas, Grove road, pastor ; services, sun. 11 а.m. & 6.30 p.m

Baptist Church, Longley road, Tooting Graveney, G. H. Rumsey, 1 Havelock villas, Park road, Merton, pastor; services, sun. 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; monday, prayer meeting, 7.30 p.m. ; thurs. service, 7.30 p.m. & Saturday 7.30 p.m

Congregational, Zion, Upper green, Rev. Robert Richman, Douglas house, High street, pastor; 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; wed. 7.30 p.m

United Methodist Free Church, High street, Colliers wood, Merton, Rev. W. H. Proudlove, minister; services, sun. 11 a.m. & б.30 p.m. ; wed. 7.45 p.m

United Methodist Free Church, Lower green, Rev. Henry Codling, minister; 11 a.m. & 6.30 p.m.; thurs. 7 p.m

Gospel Hall, Longley road, Tooting Graveney

Woodite Chapel, Mitcham Common

Missions

Baptist Mission Room, Crown rd. Morden rd

Mission Room, Bath road

Christ Church Mission Room, Church road, Merton

Parish Church Mission Room, Rock terrace, Mitcham

Parish Church Mission Room, Half-Acre

Salvation Army Barracks, Gladstone road

Board Schools

A School Board of 7 members was formed in 1871, increased to 9 in 1886; W. J. Dickisson, Causeway, Lower Mitcham, clerk to the school board ; Thomas Tomkins, 4 King’s road, Grove road, attendance officer

Lower green, Mitcham, formerly National school & transferred to school board in 1871, for 260 boys, 100 girls & 160 infants; average attendance, 230 boys, 90 girls & 90 infants ; Thomas A. Compton, master ; Miss E. Rutherford, mistress ; Miss Caroline Brooks, infants’ mistress

Lower Green Boys’ School (temporary); George R. Waters, master

Killick’s lane, Upper Mitcham, built in 1884, for 400 girls & infants ; average attendance, 148 girls & 158 infants ; Miss Annie Fawcett, mistress; Miss Alice Sears, infants’ mistress

Singlegate, Church road, Merton, erected in 1874, boys, girls & infants; average attendance, 200 boys, 133 girls & 209 infants & enlarged in 1884; William Harbour master ; Miss A. Campbell, mistress ; Miss Mary Edwards, infants’ mistress

Schools

British, Upper green (girls & infants), erected in 1842, for 250 children ; average attend-ance, 240 ; Miss E. Kenyon, mistress

Christ Church Sunday Schools, Church road, Merton

Lower Mitcham, Catholic (mixed), erected about 1867, for 120 children; average at-tendance, 90; Miss Sarah M. Dawson, mist

Holborn Union Industrial, High street, Upper Mitcham, William George Benton, superintendent; Mrs. Annie Benton, matron ; Thomas R. Knight, schoolmaster; Miss Elizabeth Boto, schoolmistress

Benevolent Institution

Almshouses, Causeway, Lower Mitcham

Clubs, Societies etc.

Convalescent Home, 92 Longley road, Tooting Graveney; Miss Caroline Goldsmid, proprietress ; Miss Julia Salinger, matron

Liberty Hall, The Broadway, Mitcham

Mitcham Conservative & Unionist Club, Upper green, H. W. White, sec

Mitcham District Mutual Building Society, Vestry hall, Mitcham ; G. T. Hodges, sec

Prince’s Golf Club, Mitcham common; Robt. H. Cox, managing director

Village Club & Working Men’s Institute, High street, Colliers wood, Merton

Railway Stations

L. B. & S. C. Railway.

Mitcham Junction, Horace William B. East- land, station master

Lower Mitcham, Walter Thomas Martin, station master

St Marks Road

Road that today runs eastwards from London Road, where the Baths used to be, then curves south to the end of Majestic Way and heads east again to Lammas Avenue.

Originally called Killick’s Lane until the St Marks church was built in 1898. It was named after Samuel Killick, a local builder who had his yard there. Amongst the various local buildings, his name is mentioned on the blue plaque at the parish vicarage, which reads:

This building, erected by Samuel Killick in 1826 for the Rev. Richard Cranmer, replaces an earlier vicarage.

The fanlight and the unusual pattern of window glazing bars are interesting features.

1910 OS map

Numbers 1 to 7 on the north side of St Marks Road at the London Road end was known as York Place.

The 1911 street directory shows two lines of houses both called St Mark’s Villas. The first is a terrace of 4 houses to the west of the school, and the second a group of 8 houses as 4 semi-detached houses, numbered from 1 to 8 from the corner with Lansdell Road. Below are the occupants from this directory, as described from London Road towards Eastfields:

NORTH SIDE

1, John K. HARVEY, chemist
2, John Samuel WRIGHT, dining rooms
3, George YORK, undertaker
4, James PRICE, hair dresser
5, William WHITTINGTON, tobacconist
6, W.A.MARTIN, butcher
7, Mrs S. RIMMEL, grocer

STAIR COTTAGES:

1, John TAYLOR
2, William Jesse LUNT
3, Frederick BURTON
4, Albert Edward BLAND
5, William TYLER
6, William LAWRENCE

ST. MARK’S VILLAS:

4, John SUDDS
3, John William GILMORE
2, John William MONKS
1, George WHITTINGHAM

St. Mark’s Sunday School
Walter JORDAN (School house)
Council Schools

ST. MARK’S VILLAS:

8, Frederick WHITE
7, Alfred R. CHEAL
6, Charles Henry J SIVIOUR
5, Noel Austin HARVEY
4, George William LAWRENCE
3, Henry BENNETT
2, Walter BLACKSTONE
1, William MATTHEWS

…. here is Lansdell Road

SOUTH SIDE
RAVENSBURY COTTAGES:
8, Thomas CLARKE
7, Charles TARRANT
6, Henry DRINKWATER
5, Mrs ROBERTS
4, Edward BURTON
3, Mrs E. KILBY

Alfred NASH & Sons, wheelwrights

George Arthur MIZEN
F.L. & A.G. MIZEN, market gardeners
St. Marks Church

Between Stair’s Cottages and the School House, the 1922 electoral register shows two terraces: South View Cottages and South Place, each with four dwellings. The order shown in the register is repeated here.

SOUTH VIEW COTTAGES
1, John William and Eva Jessie GILMORE
2, Alfred and Bathsheba OLDMEADOW
3, John and Betsy WADDINGTON
4, David and Lily JONES

SOUTH PLACE
4, John JORDAN; John William and Kate HAWKINS
3, William Charles and Kate COLLYER
2, Alfred, Mary and Alfred junior COUSALL
1, Ernest Edward and Elizabeth Lucy JONES

In the 1925 street directory, all the houses have been renumbered.

Stairs Cottages from 6 to 1 were renumbered 15 to 25 St Marks Road.

South View Cottages 1 to 4 were renumbered 29 to 35 St Marks Road, see 1925 directory below, and South Place from 4 to 1 were renumbered 37 to 43.

The School House became number 47, occupied by Frederick, Alice and Frederick Henry NEWSOM.

Houses named Doniford became number 59 and Astroea became 61.

NORTH SIDE
Fair green:

1, John K. HARVEY M.P.S., chemist
3, William SCRATCHLEY, dining rooms
5, George YORK, undertaker
7, H. TEDDER, hair dresser
9, William WHITTINGTON, tobacconist
11, A. BACON, hosier
13, S. & E. RIMMEL, grocers
15, Edward Charles STEVENS
17, William MERSH, boot repairer
19, Mrs BURTON
21, Frederick WELLER
23, William WELLER; Miss WELLER, pianoforte teacher
23 (back of) Thomas WELLER, cartage contractor
25, Herbert Fras. Joe SMITH
29, John William GILMORE
31, Alfred OLDMEADOW
33, John WADDINGTON
35, David JONES
37, John William HAWKINS
39, William Charles COLLYER
41, COUSALL & Sons, coal merchants
43, Alfred COUSALL

St Mark’s Parish Room
Upper Mitcham Girls’ School (Surrey Education Committee)

47, Frederick NEWSOM, school keeper
49, Rd. TOWNSEND, coal merchant
49, CARBONIUS Co. compresses carbon manufacturers

59, Henry William AYRES
61, Herbert CORNELL
63, (Sunbury) James LAW
65, (Tolworth) Miss SHEPHERD
67, (Belmont) Frederick SAWYERS
69, (Ardley) Mrs SELLAR
71, (Tongham) A. WARE
73, (Colyton) Alfred CRAIG
75, (Abinger) F. LITTLE
77, John WHALEBONE

83, Frederick WHITE
85, Alfred Robert CHEAL
87, W.L. WHITELEY
89, Mrs A.M. BENNETT
91, Robert J. WELCH
93, Harry BENNETT, insurance agent
95, Walter BLACKSTONE
97, William MATTHEWS

SOUTH SIDE

St. Mark’s Church

…. here is Baker’s Lane

(Maycroft) James Ernest PELLING
(Granville) William W. ORVES
(Kenwood) Charles EVELYN
(Glan-y-Mor) George MARRIN
34, William Henry BEWEN
32, (Homestead) Robert WILSON
30, HUDSON & BLAKE, automobile engineers
28, Oliver BROWN Ltd., varnish manufacturers
26, (Home Close) Charles LACK
24, Edgar HUME
22, Alfred REES
20, Mrs F. BENNETT
16, James DREWETT
14, Mrs MILLS
12, Miss RUFF
10, Edward BURTON
8, Stephen TAYLOR; Henry DRINKWATER
4, Mrs TARRANT
2, Thomas CLARK

Note that at no. 13, S. & E. RIMMEL, grocers, was also listed in the 1911 directory at the same address (when it was no.7) and Sarah E. Rimmel, grocers, was listed in the 1938 commercial directory.

Charles LACK was the son of Hannah LACK who ran the drapers at 4 High Street, Mitcham. With his wife Emily he ran the drapers at no. 2 next door. (From a descendant who made a comment about this on the Facebook Mitcham History group.)

The St Mark’s Parish Room was originally a ‘School Church’ whose appointed mission clergyman in 1891 was the Reverend F.J. LANSDELL whose name is the origin of Lansdell Road.

This OS map from 1952 shows the houses numbered as in the 1925 directory:

1952 OS map

Note that no.s 1 to 43 and the St Marks Parish Room have now gone and is where the pedestrian Majestic Way is today, and that no.s 27 to 35 were set back from the road, this is where the Morrison supermarket is now, and between the supermarket and the school is where St Marks Road today diverts north and west through where the Mitcham Baths was.

Between the school and no. 59 is where Armfield Crescent is today, and between 77 and 83 is now Bedfont Close.

On the south side, the paint works at 28 have gone, and that is where Chalkley Close is today. Number 26 is owned by the Royal British Legion and hosts the Poppy Club. Number 30 is still there.


Adverts

undated ad for GM Paynter at 13 St Marks Road


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

1890 : Church denied share of profits from Mitcham Common gravel extraction

From the Huddersfield Daily Chronicle – Thursday 17th July 1890

A CURIOUS CASE.

Mr. Justice Kekewich, on Wednesday, decided a curious case raised by the Ecclesiastical Commissioner, who, in 1862, were made lords of the manor of Vauxhall, who now brought an action against the devisees of James Bridger, lord of the manor of Biggin and Tamworth. and also the lords of the manor of Mitcham and Ravensbury, to recover one-fourth of the profits derived by the defendants from the gravel digging on Mitcham Common. The Ecclesiastical Commissioners contended that they were successors of the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury. the title being traced back to the reign of Edward I., who granted the manor to the Black Prince, who transferred it to the convent of Christ Church, Canterbury, and on the dissolution of the monasteries it was vested in the Crown in the reign of Henry VIII. The plaintiffs urged that the manor extended to Mitcham Common, which belonged to them and the other lords of the manor as tenants in common, and that, therefore, they were entitled to take their share of the gravel. His lordship gave judgment against the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, with costs, holding that they had failed to make out their case.

1877 : Methodism in Mitcham

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 22 December 1877

METHODISM AT MITCHAM

The following particulars as to the history of Methodism generally, and particularly in regard to the parish of Mitcham may be interesting to our readers. They formed the basis of lecture given by Mr. John Wade a short time since.

The term Methodism was first applied about the year 1729 to four young men at Oxford, namely, John Wesley, Charles Wesley, and two others named Morgan and Kirkham, and a year or two afterwards to Messrs. Ingham, Broughton, Clayton, Hervey, and last, not least, George Whitfield, who met together at stated times for prayer, searching the Scriptures, and mutual edification, and also devoted themselves to the visiting of the prisoners in the gaol, the sick, and the poor. This course of conduct did not fail to attract the notice of their fellow collegians, and it is recorded that one of them, a young gentleman of Christ Church, exclaimed, Here is a new set of Methodists sprung up! alluding to some ancient physicians, who were so called about 30 or 40 B.C., and the name has been applied to them or their followers ever since. They were also derisively called “Sacramentarians,” and the “Holy Club.” Many of the influential masters and doctors of the University frowned upon them, but to no purpose. It was thought desirable by the family that John Wesley should succeed his father as incumbent at Epworth, but Wesley preferred remaining at Oxford as a tutor. About April, 1735, a new colony was formed in Georgia, North America, and Mr. Wesley consented to there as chaplain. Mr. Wesley’s High Church principles some time after brought him into collision with the authorities, and he left Georgia in October, 1737. February, 1738, he arrived in London, having been absent therefrom about two years and four months, and became acquainted with the Moravians, whom he afterwards joined. He subsequently visited the Moravian settlement at Hernhut, in Moravia, and on his return to England, as he was shut out of the churches, and Whitfield commenced preaching in the open air. In July, 1740, Mr. Wesley separated from the Moravians, and established a society which met a place called “The Foundry,” which had been used for casting cannon, in Moorfields, and from this date, until his death in 1791, in the year of his age, he pursued a successful career in spreading religion through the land. The first mention of Methodism as respects Mitcham is contained in vol. 4 of Mr. Wesley’s Journal, page 117, under the date of January 12, 1764 (113 years since), where there occur the words:—

”I preached at noon at Mitcham, and in the afternoon rode to Dorking, but the gentleman to whose house I was invited seemed to have no desire that I should preach, so that evening I had nothing to do; but on the next day (Friday, Jan. 13th) I went at noon into the street, and in broad place not far from the market-house proclaimed ’The Grace of our Lord Jesus Christ.’ At first two or three little children were the whole of my congregation, but it quickly increased, though the air was sharp, and the ground exceedingly wet, and all behaved well but three or four grumbling men, who stood so far off that they disturbed none but themselves, had purposed to preach there again in the morning, but a violent storm made it impracticable, after preaching at Mitcham on the way, I rode back to London.”

Nothing appears to have arisen from this first effort of Mr. Wesley to introduce Methodism into Mitcham, until about years after, namely, on March 13th, 1776, on which date an entry occurs in his journal the effect that he went to Mitcham and found a little company just started up. The house being too small, preached the front of house adjoining the high road, where the earnestness of the people made up for the keenness of the east wind. The place where Mr. Wesley preached on this occasion was opposite the King’s Head inn, Lower Green. The next notice under the date of Nov. 6th, 1787, and records the fact that Mr. Wesley again preached at Mitcham. Steps were then taken build chapel. A piece of ground was taken on the Causeway on lease for 71 years, and the chapel was opened in November, 1789 Mr. Wesley preached in the new chapel December 1st, 1789, and Mitcham continued part of the London circuit until the year 1811, the pulpit being mostly supplied from London. After this it formed what was called the Brentford circuit, still more recently the Hammersmith circuit, and since the year 1838 part of the Croydon circuit. The lease of the old chapel having expired, a fresh site was obtained on the opposite side of Mitcham Green, near the old chapel, for years, and on this site the present new chapel has been erected at cost of about £1,100.

Methodist Church Upper Green East

The Methodist church at Upper Green East (south side), was destroyed by bombing in September 1940. It was not rebuilt.

1933 OS map shows the Methodist Church

A British Pathe newsreel, without commentary, is believed to show the bomb damage to the church. Shops and buildings across the road can be seen damaged by the blast as well.

1954 OS map shows the vacant plot where the church once was. It was later developed as Langdale Parade

The church was rebuilt on Cricket Green.

1929 : Funeral of Mr J.G. Guyatt

From the Mitcham Advertiser and Surrey County Report, 14th March, 1929, page 1.

Mr J.G. Guyatt.

Funeral of a Well Known
Contractor.

The funeral of Mr JG Guyatt, the well-known contractor of Mitcham and Brixton, who died suddenly last week at his Mitcham home, Grove Lodge, Sutton Road, at the age of 75, took place on Saturday morning.

Mr Guyatt was one of the largest cartage contractors in the London area and at one time owned over 100 horses and carts. Of late years motor lorries largely displaced the horse-drawn vehicle, but Mr Guyatt retained his love of horses to the end. It was fitting that his funeral procession should be of the old-fashioned horse-drawn kind.

The first part of the service was held in the Wesleyan Mission Church, Fair Green. It was conducted by the minister, the Rev. A. Denman Martin, who also officiated at the graveside.

Mrs Guyatt, who died two years ago, and her daughters were formerly active members of the Mission, and Mrs Parks, the younger daughter, was a member of the choir and a soloist. Before coming to Mitcham seventeen years ago the family worshipped at Brixton Hill Wesleyan church.

Mr Guyatt, who took no active part in Mitcham public affairs, succeeded to the business founded by his father and extended it enormously. He owned several gravel pits in Mitcham and was a contractor to many local bodies. His chief interest outside his business was his old-world garden at the rear of the house. He was the eldest of twelve children, ten of whom survive him. His own family consists of two sons and two daughters. The business will be carried on by the elder son. The younger one, Mr Frank Guyatt, has a separate motor transport business.

Mr Guyatt, who had not quite recovered from a serious illness, which left his heart in a weak state, was at work as usual on Monday last week, the day before his death. He collapsed at breakfast time and passed away in a quarter of an hour, to the sincere regret to all who knew him or had business relations with him.

Mr Nicholls, the organist, played “Oh Rest in the Lord” as the funeral procession entered into the church and later the Funeral March. The hymn sung was “Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand”.

The mourners were Mr JG Guyatt and Mr Frank Guyatt (sons); Mrs SE Crabb and Mrs H Parks (daughters); Mr W Guyatt, Mr L Guyatt, Mr John Guyatt, Mrs Howes and Mrs Priest (brothers and sisters).

Others present were Mrs JG Guyatt, Mrs Frank Guyatt, Mr and Mrs JG Guyatt, junior; Mrs John Guyatt, Miss Herbert and Mrs W Guyatt, junior; Mr C Guyatt, Miss L Guyatt, Mr E Guyatt, Miss Priest, Mr Howes, Mr Rickard, Mr Priest, Mrs Calver and Mr Robert Parks.

The beautiful floral tributes included wreaths from all the aforementioned families and from Dr Shelswell, Mr Rawlings, Eastfields Pit, the workpeople at Eastfields, Mitcham yard, motor department (Brixton Hill), horse department, Mr and Mrs Arthur Beard, Mr and Mrs Thatcher, Mrs G T Hodges and family, Mr and Mrs Cramp and family, Mr Walter Clarkson and family, Mr H Clarkson and Sons, Mr Wells (Eastfields), Mr and Mrs P Bell, Mr and Mrs J Ellis, Mr and Mrs John Gillett, Mr and Mrs J Emmerton, Mr William Priest, Volan and Trigg (George Neal and Sons), Mr Nathan Guyatt, Mrs Collins, Mr and Mrs Halliday, Mr Moon, Mr and Mrs Bruce Thompson, Mr John Cronk and family, Mr and Mrs George Thompson and family, Mrs Shepherd, Mrs Allen and Mrs Johnson.

Christ Church, Colliers Wood

sketch of the church from the May 1926 issue of their magazine

Church, on Christchurch Road, which was built in 1874.

Its address is 58 Christchurch Rd, Colliers Wood, London SW19 2NY

It was originally in the Mitcham parish and was built to cater for the increasing population in north Mitcham. The area covered by the church was described in the London Gazette, see District Chapelry of Christ Church.

From The Builder magazine, 4th July 1874:

Church-Building News
Mitcham.

The new church at Singleton has been consecrated by the Bishop of Winchester. The edifice, which containes 550 sittings, has been built from designs by Messrs. Francis, of London, the total cost being £4,283. The chief part of this sum has been the joint contribution of Mr and Mrs Harris, of Gorringe Park, Mitcham, who have also erected, at their sole cost, a parsonage and mission-room, on the adjoining ground. The amount of their gift is between £6,000 and £7,000. The site has been in part the gift of Emanuel College.

Note the spelling Singleton should have been Singlegate.

Eric Montague said, in his book Mitcham Histories 2 : North Mitcham, page 93, that in 1968, on his suggestion, the chapelry boundary stone that was in Streatham Road, opposite the east lodge of Gorringe Park House, be moved to the church for safe keeping.

In this OS map of 1895, the church was surrounded by fields, with watercress beds opposite.

1895 OS map

See also the history of Christ Church on the church’s website.


Photos taken 15th April, 2019


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.