Category Archives: Buildings

Caesar’s Walk

Road that runs south westerly from Cranmer Road to the footpath alongside the tram line. On this 1932 OS map, the footpath is shown as Tramway Path.

1932 OS map

Road sign at corner of Caesars Walk and Cranmer Road. The Wilson Hospital can be seen in the background.

The name of the road refers to Sir Julius Caesar Adelmere who, it was believed, had a mansion on the site where the Wilson Hospital is now. In 1598 he entertained Queen Elizabeth I. From this the names of the roads off of Caesars Walk are related to that monarch.

However, Eric Montague, in his book Mitcham Histories:11 The Cranmers, The Canons and Park Place, page 70, says that local records indicate that Sir Julius’s residence was actually south of the Burn Bullock, on the London Road.

Sir Isaac Wilson had bought in 1926 the Cranmers and surrounding land that stretched across the South London and Sutton railway line to the junction of Cranmer Road/Willow Lane with Carshalton Road. He built the eponymous hospital, which opened in 1928, as well as the Garden Village. In between the two he developed Caesars Walk, Burghley Place, Cecil Place, Walsingham Road and Hatton Gardens.

Ad for number 29, on the corner with Walsingham Road, from the Norwood News – Friday 27th October 1933

MITCHAM COMMON

(7 mins, Mitcham Junction Station, 20 mins, Town); semi-detached freehold house; built 6 years; garage; 3 bed, 2 reception,bathroom. kitchenette; gas, e. l., hot water; re-decorated; excellent condition; £650. – Owner, 29, Caesars-walk. Mitcham.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Greenview, 6 Cricket Green

House at no. 6 Cricket Green, which is next door to the cricket pavilion and was built in 1903 for Lt. Col. Stephen Chart, son of Robert Masters Chart.

clip from 1910 postcard on Merton Memories, photo reference Mit_Streets_LOV_LOW_41-11

From the Mitcham Cricket Club Yearbook of 1955, page 61, when he was the President of the Mitcham Cricket Club:

Col. Chart recalls the story of the two trees standing opposite his house which obscured the view across the Green. By arrangement, these trees were removed by permission of the Conservators and two new trees were supplied by Mr. R. M. Chart and planted by him at a site opposite the Town Hall, outside the boundary of the cricket ground, where they flourish to this day.

R. M. Chart. J.P., father of the President, was at that time secretary of the Green Protection Society, a body which was formed about 1875, “… to preserve the Green from coconut shies and grazing horses “.

It was during his term of office in 1894 that the Surrey Club contributed £25, half the cost, towards a better system of drainage on the Green. In dry weather in the Summer the
direction of the drains can be clearly seen against the background of dry grass. Fred Gale, who was a great supporter of Mitcham cricket had the Green “Bush drained” some years
previously.