Tag Archives: 1952

St Marks Road

Road that today runs eastwards from London Road, where the Baths used to be, then curves south to the end of Majestic Way and heads east again to Lammas Avenue.

Originally called Killick’s Lane until the St Marks church was built in 1898. It was named after Samuel Killick, a local builder who had his yard there. Amongst the various local buildings, his name is mentioned on the blue plaque at the parish vicarage, which reads:

This building, erected by Samuel Killick in 1826 for the Rev. Richard Cranmer, replaces an earlier vicarage.

The fanlight and the unusual pattern of window glazing bars are interesting features.

1910 OS map

Numbers 1 to 7 on the north side of St Marks Road at the London Road end was known as York Place.

The 1911 street directory shows two lines of houses both called St Mark’s Villas. The first is a terrace of 4 houses to the west of the school, and the second a group of 8 houses as 4 semi-detached houses, numbered from 1 to 8 from the corner with Lansdell Road. Below are the occupants from this directory, as described from London Road towards Eastfields:

NORTH SIDE

1, John K. HARVEY, chemist
2, John Samuel WRIGHT, dining rooms
3, George YORK, undertaker
4, James PRICE, hair dresser
5, William WHITTINGTON, tobacconist
6, W.A.MARTIN, butcher
7, Mrs S. RIMMEL, grocer

STAIR COTTAGES:

1, John TAYLOR
2, William Jesse LUNT
3, Frederick BURTON
4, Albert Edward BLAND
5, William TYLER
6, William LAWRENCE

ST. MARK’S VILLAS:

4, John SUDDS
3, John William GILMORE
2, John William MONKS
1, George WHITTINGHAM

St. Mark’s Sunday School
Walter JORDAN (School house)
Council Schools

ST. MARK’S VILLAS:

8, Frederick WHITE
7, Alfred R. CHEAL
6, Charles Henry J SIVIOUR
5, Noel Austin HARVEY
4, George William LAWRENCE
3, Henry BENNETT
2, Walter BLACKSTONE
1, William MATTHEWS

…. here is Lansdell Road

SOUTH SIDE
RAVENSBURY COTTAGES:
8, Thomas CLARKE
7, Charles TARRANT
6, Henry DRINKWATER
5, Mrs ROBERTS
4, Edward BURTON
3, Mrs E. KILBY

Alfred NASH & Sons, wheelwrights

George Arthur MIZEN
F.L. & A.G. MIZEN, market gardeners
St. Marks Church

A resident of one of the remaining St Marks Villas, Stan, pointed out to me this sign is visible on the garden wall of some of the houses:

part of sign showing no. 2 St. Mark’s Villas

Between Stair’s Cottages and the School House, the 1922 electoral register shows two terraces: South View Cottages and South Place, each with four dwellings. The order shown in the register is repeated here.

SOUTH VIEW COTTAGES
1, John William and Eva Jessie GILMORE
2, Alfred and Bathsheba OLDMEADOW
3, John and Betsy WADDINGTON
4, David and Lily JONES

SOUTH PLACE
4, John JORDAN; John William and Kate HAWKINS
3, William Charles and Kate COLLYER
2, Alfred, Mary and Alfred junior COUSALL
1, Ernest Edward and Elizabeth Lucy JONES

In the 1925 street directory, all the houses have been renumbered.

Stairs Cottages from 6 to 1 were renumbered 15 to 25 St Marks Road.

South View Cottages 1 to 4 were renumbered 29 to 35 St Marks Road, see 1925 directory below, and South Place from 4 to 1 were renumbered 37 to 43.

The School House became number 47, occupied by Frederick, Alice and Frederick Henry NEWSOM.

Houses named Doniford became number 59 and Astroea became 61.

NORTH SIDE
Fair green:

1, John K. HARVEY M.P.S., chemist
3, William SCRATCHLEY, dining rooms
5, George YORK, undertaker
7, H. TEDDER, hair dresser
9, William WHITTINGTON, tobacconist
11, A. BACON, hosier
13, S. & E. RIMMEL, grocers
15, Edward Charles STEVENS
17, William MERSH, boot repairer
19, Mrs BURTON
21, Frederick WELLER
23, William WELLER; Miss WELLER, pianoforte teacher
23 (back of) Thomas WELLER, cartage contractor
25, Herbert Fras. Joe SMITH
29, John William GILMORE
31, Alfred OLDMEADOW
33, John WADDINGTON
35, David JONES
37, John William HAWKINS
39, William Charles COLLYER
41, COUSALL & Sons, coal merchants
43, Alfred COUSALL

St Mark’s Parish Room
Upper Mitcham Girls’ School (Surrey Education Committee)

47, Frederick NEWSOM, school keeper
49, Rd. TOWNSEND, coal merchant
49, CARBONIUS Co. compresses carbon manufacturers

59, Henry William AYRES
61, Herbert CORNELL
63, (Sunbury) James LAW
65, (Tolworth) Miss SHEPHERD
67, (Belmont) Frederick SAWYERS
69, (Ardley) Mrs SELLAR
71, (Tongham) A. WARE
73, (Colyton) Alfred CRAIG
75, (Abinger) F. LITTLE
77, (Bramley) John WHALEBONE

83, Frederick WHITE
85, Alfred Robert CHEAL
87, W.L. WHITELEY
89, Mrs A.M. BENNETT
91, Robert J. WELCH
93, Harry BENNETT, insurance agent
95, Walter BLACKSTONE
97, William MATTHEWS

SOUTH SIDE

St. Mark’s Church

…. here is Baker’s Lane

(Maycroft) James Ernest PELLING
(Granville) William W. ORVES
(Kenwood) Charles EVELYN
(Glan-y-Mor) George MARRIN
34, William Henry BEWEN
32, (Homestead) Robert WILSON
30, HUDSON & BLAKE, automobile engineers
28, Oliver BROWN Ltd., varnish manufacturers
26, (Home Close) Charles LACK
24, Edgar HUME
22, Alfred REES
20, Mrs F. BENNETT
16, James DREWETT
14, Mrs MILLS
12, Miss RUFF
10, Edward BURTON
8, Stephen TAYLOR; Henry DRINKWATER
4, Mrs TARRANT
2, Thomas CLARK

St Mark’s Villas, numbers 83 to 97. Photo taken Sunday 19th April 2020.

Entrance to Bedfont Close from St Marks Road. On the left, the house name Bramley is shown by the front door of no. 77. Photo taken Sunday 19th April 2020.

Numbers 59 to 77 st Marks Road, from the corner with Armfield Crescent on the left to Bedfont Close on the right (out of shot). Photo taken Sunday 19th April 2020.

Note that at no. 13, S. & E. RIMMEL, grocers, was also listed in the 1911 directory at the same address (when it was no.7) and Sarah E. Rimmel, grocers, was listed in the 1938 commercial directory.

Charles LACK was the son of Hannah LACK who ran the drapers at 4 High Street, Mitcham. With his wife Emily he ran the drapers at no. 2 next door. (From a descendant who made a comment about this on the Facebook Mitcham History group.)

The St Mark’s Parish Room was originally a ‘School Church’ whose appointed mission clergyman in 1891 was the Reverend F.J. LANSDELL whose name is the origin of Lansdell Road.

This OS map from 1952 shows the houses numbered as in the 1925 directory:

1952 OS map

Note that no.s 1 to 43 and the St Marks Parish Room have now gone and is where the pedestrian Majestic Way is today, and that no.s 27 to 35 were set back from the road, this is where the Morrison supermarket is now, and between the supermarket and the school is where St Marks Road today diverts north and west through where the Mitcham Baths was.

Between the school and no. 59 is where Armfield Crescent is today, and between 77 and 83 is now Bedfont Close.

On the south side, the paint works at 28 have gone, and that is where Chalkley Close is today. Number 26 is owned by the Royal British Legion and hosts the Poppy Club. Number 30 is still there.


Adverts

undated ad for GM Paynter at 13 St Marks Road


WW1 Connections
Colenso Harry BURTON, son of Frederick and Elizabeth Burton, 3 Stair’s Cottages, St Marks Road. On the south side of the Mitcham War Memorial as BURTON, HC.

Gordon Arthur SELLAR, husband of Ada Sellar, “Ardley”, St Marks Road. This houses was renumbered to 69 as shown in the 1925 street directory above. His name is on the west side of the Mitcham War Memorial.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Gaybell’s, 415b London Road

Grocer shop that was in the middle of the three shops at 415 London Road, next to corner of Tramway Path and London Road, south of Mitcham station.

Adverts such as this continued in the Mitcham Cricket Club yearbooks until the 1961 edition,

1952 ad

Text of ad:

GAYBELLS
415b, London Road,Mitcham
(Opposite Morden Road)

COOKED MEATS
GROCERIES & PROVISIONS

Quality with Civility

New Registrations Welcomed

Phone: MIT 1714

1955 ad

From 1961, the address has Berry’s grocery and provision management.


In 2020, no. 415b is occupied by off-licence and groceries shop Prince Foods.

P.J. Clarke, newsagent and stationer

Newsagents that was at 323 London Road, Mitcham, according to this ad in 1952:

1952 ad

Text of ad:

MITcham 4886
P.J. CLARKE
Newsagent and Stationer

Books . Fancy Goods . Games
Lending Library
Printing

323, London Road, Mitcham

One minute from Cricket Green

From 1914 to 1941 this address was occupied by bookseller and newsagent Charles Edward SPENCE. No. 323 London Road was previously no. 5 Broadway, and was demolished when the road was widened.

Lilian Road

Road that runs in a southwesterly direction from Greyhound Terrace and was in of the Mitcham Urban District, but is now considered as in Streatham.

This OS map of 1952 shows the boundary line running through Leonard Road to the west, and Greyhound Line to the north.

1952 OS map

Houses are numbered odd on the east side, and even on the west side, ascending from north to south.

At number 1A, on the north east corner with Greyhound Terrace, the pub called The Mitcham Mint opened in 1968. It had previously been an off-license.

Next are two terraces, numbers 1 to 11 and 13 to 21. These can be seen on this 1910 OS map:

1910 OS map

As this area is shown on the 1897 OS map as nurseries, with no roads laid out, it is likely that this road was built around 1900 to 1910.

Note that on this 1910 map, Greyhound Terrace is shown as Manor Road, which continued along the present Rowan Road to Manor Road to the Common. The name of the road signified it being the boundary of the manor. Parts of that road were renamed in 1926 when it became necessary to renumber the houses.

On the west side of the road, houses numbered 28 to 38 and 42 to 54 appear to have been built around 1910. The current numbers 49 and 42 were built in 2008, see planning application 08/P0773.

Ruth Cole

In an ad from 1934, Ruth Cole, ladies’, children’s and gentlemen’s hairdresser, was at 6, Upper Green East.

In the 1952 Shopping Week booklet, the business was listed as a member of the Mitcham Chamber of Commerce, at 195 London Road, Mitcham.

Hairdressing
Cecilia, 160 London Road, Mitcham.
F. T. Hendry, 145 Streatham Road, Mitcham.
J. Jacobs, 5 Belgrave Road, Mitcham.
Ruth Cole, 195 London Road, Mitcham.

The business may have moved to the London Road due to bomb damage during the Blitz.

In the 1971 telephone directory, the shop is listed as Ruth Cole, Ladies Hairdressers, 195 London Road, Mitcham, 01-648 3828.

This photo from around 1987, shows the shop still being used as hairdressers, and called Goldilocks, next to Ossie’s Taverna.

clip of c. 1989 photo on Merton Memories, photo reference ref Mit_​8_​1-39

Google StreetView of April 2018 shows 195 London Road as a convenience store.

Eveline Tea Rooms

Tea rooms that was at 172 London Road, Mitcham, a terrace which was originally named Eveline Villas.

1953 view from Streatham Road looking towards the Swan pub on the left and next to it on the right awning with ‘TEAS’ and ‘refreshments’ written on it

1952

1931 ad

1926 ad

From the Surrey Mirror of 21st July, 1939, thanks for contributions to a garden party include Miss. L. Froude, Eveline Tea Rooms, Mitcham. In the 1939 Register at 172 London Road shows Louisa FROUDE, born 30 Sep 1886, single, shopkeeper.

News Articles
1957 : Human skull found in Eveline Tea Rooms Coal Shed

Hengelo Gardens

Hengelo Gardens plaque clip from Merton Memories photo reference Mit_Streets_D_LEW_35-1

This plaque was unveiled when the road was opened.

HENGELO
GARDENS

30th August 1952

This plaque was unveiled by the Burgomaster of Hengelo as a token of the friendship between the people of Mitcham and Hengelo in The Netherlands

The road was named after the town of Hengelo, in the Netherlands. In 1945 an Anglo-Netherlands Sports Scheme was started between Mitcham and Hengelo, see news article below.

2019 Open Street Map of Hengelo Gardens

In 1955, a square in Hengelo had been renamed Mitchamplein. It is now a car park.

It is not known when the plaque was removed.


News Articles about Hengelo and Mitcham

Norwood News – Friday 29 June 1945

Mitcham Adopts Hengelo

Anglo-Netherlands Sports Scheme

A representative body of Mitcham sportsmen held an inaugural meeting last week in the staff canteen of Messrs. Stewart and Gray, Paisley Works, Mitcham, in connection with the Anglo – Netherlands Sports Scheme. The Mayor of Mitcham (Ald. A H. Bailey), who presided, spoke of his great friendship for the Dutch people, and how pleased he felt with the idea of the Anglo-Netherlands Sports Scheme, and it gave him much pleasure to accept the presidency of the Mitcham section.

After an address by Mr. Yapp, who convened the meeting, it was unanimously agreed that Mitcham should adopt the scheme and link up with Hengelo, in Holland, Hengelo being on a par with Mitcham in size, population and industries. Everyone at the meeting felt that Mitcham was about to enter into an era of great sporting events, and that the happy associations made between the people and their brave Dutch Allies during the war would be continued and improved through the activities of this sports scheme.

The following officers and committee were unanimously elected: President, the Mayor of Mitcham ; chairman, Mr. A. R. Hillen; general hon. secretary, Mr. J. W. Yapp ; treasurer, Mr. J. Beverige ; Finance Committee, the chairman. general hon. secretary and treasurer, with Messrs. J. Forsyth and J. Simper ; General Purposes Committee, Messrs. S. Mackinnon, R. Murphy, W. Wilder, P. W. Collard, Thos. Sibley. A. Lacey, E. Willard. C. Smith, Thos. Bicknell, E. Chambers, C. Runcieman, W. Wilson, Flying Officer Judd, and the hon. secretary. The committee agreed to co-opt other local sportsmen. Anyone interested should write to the general secretary, Mr. J. W. Yapp, 60 Streatham-road, Mitcham, Surrey. Sportswomen are particularly invited.

West Sussex Gazette – Thursday 23 August 1945

The link-up of Mitcham with Hengelo, Holland, for sport and social purposes has been completed by the Netherlanders’ hearty acceptance and reciprocation of the scheme. For the present, transport is the difficulty, but it is hoped to send two Mitcham football teams over before the end of the year. At Hengelo there are plenty of football-minded enthusiasts, and two teams awaiting International contests between the goal-posts The local papers there are co-operating in forewarding this happy way of fraternisation

West Sussex Gazette – Thursday 30 September 1948

VISITORS FROM HOLLAND

Glorious week-end weather greatly enhanced the cheerfulness of the Mayor of Mitcham’s informal welcome to the Burgomaster of Hengelo, Holland, and his party of 60 sports players to spend a week in Mitcham.

It is the return visit of the Mitcham pilgrimage to Hengelo in 1946. On Saturday morning the sights of London were toured. including the Houses of Parliament. In the afternoon the visitors saw the first of Mitcham’s football and the last cricket match of the season on the elm-bordered Green now tinged wIth russet tints of autumn. The evening was filled with a gala at Mitcham Baths attended by several ex-Olympic competitors. Sunday brought another London tour and korfball.

The formal civic welcome to the guests (put up in Mitcham homes) was at the Town Hall on Monday evening. Thereafter a full programme till the young Netherlanders return next Saturday.

West Sussex Gazette – Thursday 09 December 1948

As others see us. A journalist who came to Mitcham with the friendship pilgrims from Hengelo, Holland, afterwards wrote in his home paper that Mitcham was “a simple factory town without many attractions”! The other Dutch reporter visitor discovered that our ” pubs ” close early, and that cafes, known in the Netherlands, do not exist here. Moreover, at our public-houses, “strangely enough,” he wrote, you have to stand, and the beer is bad; and, what is more, very expensive”!