Tag Archives: 1966

Gardeners Arms Pub Sign

The Gardeners Arms pub, 107 London Road, Mitcham, had a heraldic style sign hanging from a post in the centre of the wall on the upper floor. In November 2017, the sign couldn’t be found by the new landlord.

There are three photographs on Merton Memories, and none show a sign attached, for example, this one from 1989:

Clip from Merton Memories photo Mit_21_11-2 copyright London Borough of Merton.

This undated black an white photo shows flower baskets hanging from the wall:

Clip from Merton Memories photo Mit_21_11-1 copyright London Borough of Merton.

The late Eric Montague, of the Merton Historical Society, took a slide of 109 & 111 London Road in 1966, and this included the pub, which has no sign.

A 1973 photo on the Collage collection also doesn’t show the sign:

1973

The only photograph found so far showing the sign is from Google Street View, from 2008:-

The sign is blurred when zooming in, but what can be seen is shield with a blue background, a white chevron with two objects above and three or more below. The shield has two supporters, one of which may be a gardener. The Surrey Coats of Arms, online at the Surrey History centre website, have been searched for Mitcham arms, and none of these have a field of blue with a white chevron.

Street View of 2012 shows no sign:

2012

1966 : Star School – name is the same as a pub

The name’s the same as a pub

THE Star Junior and Infants’ Schools, Church Road, Mitcham, may be renamed — because the name also refers to a public house opposite.

Merton Council’s Primary Education Sub-Committee have recommended that the new name be the Benedict Junior and Infants’ School.

At a meeting on Monday Coun. R. A. Spalding moved that the recommendation be referred back.

He said : “I can see a case for changing the name but I’m not in favour of calling it Benedict. I would like to see it changed to the original name of the Lower Mitcham School. Benedict has a connection with monks.”

Coun. H. J. Clack, chairman, said : “The Star refers to a public house. We preferred the connection to be with monks rather than a public house.” The motion was defeated.

Source: Mitcham News & Mercury, 14th January, 1966, page 1.

The school is currently known as Benedict Primary School. The Star pub was demolished in 2003.

J.K. Harvey, chemists

Early 1900s view of the chemist shop of J.K. Harvey in York Place, Fair Green. This clip is from Merton Memories photo 30338 (c) London Borough of Merton

Early 1900s view of the chemist shop of J.K. Harvey in York Place, Fair Green. This clip is from Merton Memories photo 30338 (c) London Borough of Merton

Chemist closes after 88 years

An old-established chemist’s shop at Fair Green, Mitcham, closed at the end of June.

Founded in 1878, the business was taken over in 1943 by the late John Kentish Harvey, a well known local man who was for many years church warden at St Mark’s, Mitcham.

After his death in 1955 the business was run by his two sons, Mr John Kentish Harvey and Mr Lawrence Reginald Harvey, Langdale Road, Mitcham.

But in recent years there has been a shortage of qualified pharmacists and the firm unable to obtain a permanent one had to close down.

Mr J.K. Harvey and Mr L.R. Harvey, who both work in the City, will still be living in Mitcham.

Source: Mitcham News & Mercury, 22nd July 1966.

In the 1928 electoral register, at number 1 St Mark’s Road, John Kentish Harvey was listed as an occupation voter whose address was 36 Langdale Avenue.

ad from 1938

Mitcham Police Station

The current police station was opened on Saturday 18th June 1966. The previous building it replaced opened in 1855.

It was announced in 1964, that the building was to be demolished, eighty years after it was built.

POLICE STATION IS COMING DOWN

Work on Mitcham’s new police station has started. For this week a demolition squad moved in to knock down the old station, which dates from 1884.

The squad were expected in October but they didn’t arrive and it looked as though local police would have to put up with their present building for some time to come.

A temporary police station was erected but no signs of the old one coming down were to be seen.

The present station, which overlooks the Cricket Green, will be replaced by a modern building, probably with several storeys.

Work is expected to take 18 months.

Source: Mitcham News & Mercury, 5th June, 1964, page 1.


Mayor opens new police station

Mitcham’s new £98,000 police station was officially opened on Saturday by the Mayor of Merton, Sir Cyril Black. And over 3,000 members of the public toured the station and visited a special exhibition in the car park throughout the day.

“The open day was very successful, far better than we anticipated,” commented Inspector S.W. Brunger, who organised the day with Supt. H.W. Gibson.

He added: “Open days are usually held for particular occasions like an opening. But because the public showed a great deal of interest it is quite possible they will be held more often.”

The opening ceremony was held on the top floor in the canteen. Members from all walks of life were present and Mr Robert Carr, M.P., arrived later.

Sir Cyril Black said he hoped the police would have no work to do in their new station, but if they did it would have a satisfactory completion.

He emphasised the need for the public to see what goes on in a police station and to understand the policeman’s work.

He said: “The police are anxious that their work is fully understood by the public. We must realise the task in which the police are engaged.”

He added: “The public have got to be educated in their duty to co-operate with the police. The task of policemen would be easier if full co-operation from the public was always forthcoming.”

Commander G.C.F. Duncan said the ambition of the police was to show the people of Mitcham what they are paying for and what goes on in the station. He said they wanted to knock down the idea that the police were working behind closed doors. The police had nothing to hide from the public.

“This is the newest police building in South London,” he said, “and it took many years to achieve it, but it has got to last a long time and we hope the public will think the money was well spent.”

Plans for the new station were first under way in 1962 and building started in 1964. It stands on the site of the old station which was built in 1884.

Before the public started to arrive the guests were taken on a tour of the station. They saw the various offices, detention rooms and the cells.

Then in the car park at the rear they saw an exhibition that included a mobile police unit, police dogs and horses, police sports car and a car that was involved in a fatal accident.

The most important exhibition was a special van and equipment used when accidents have occurred and to warn other motorists of the accident and dangers ahead.

Then from lunchtime to well into the evening the public were shown round.

One little girl was so pleased with her visit that she presented the sergeant on duty at the front reception desk with a flower.

Source: Mitcham News & Mercury, 24th June 1966, page 1.


Aerial view showing front of building.

Aerial view showing front of building.

Aerial view showing rear of building. The road on the right is Mitcham Park.

Aerial view showing rear of building. The road on the right is Mitcham Park.

Bridge Road

Road that was off east, or right-hand, side of Christchurch Road, opposite Runnymede. It was closed in 1966.

In this 1952 OS map, the road is shown with a single terrace of eleven houses on the north side, numbered sequentially 1 to 11.

1952 OS map

1952 OS map

Aerial photo from 1947 shows the row of houses on the left side of the road.

29th April 1947 from Britain From Above

29th April 1947 from Britain From Above

Aerial photo from 1949 shows the road looking to the west. The dome atop the tower on the right was Frys Metals factory.

19th March 1949 from Britain From Above

19th March 1949 from Britain From Above

It is not mentioned in the 1891 street directory, but there are two houses listed in the 1896 street directory and all eleven in the 1904 street directory:

1896

1, James CAVENDER, stationer
2, John STOPHER, greengrocer

1904

1, James CAVENDER, stationer
2, Arthur Thomas THORNS, greengrocer
3, Auburn Frederick ISACKE
4, Austin C HOLLANDS
5, William SHARPE
6, Arthur Albert FRISBY
7, Charles TAYLOR
8, Arthur SWINDELL
9, Robert SWINDELL
10, Edwin YOUNG
11, William YOUNG

The road was closed in 1966:

Bridge Road is to be closed down

Bridge Road, a cul-de-sac off Christchurch Road, Mitcham is to be closed. Merton Council have given planning permission to Frys Metal Foundries Ltd., for redevelopment which involves the closing of the road.

The road was originally the principle means of access to residential properties which have since been demolished. It now serves the factory premises only.

RIGHTS OF ACCESS

The council agreed to give permission provided the council’s right of adequate access to the public sewers were preserved.

Also provided that the owner of the factory should take over the responsibility for the street lamps and cables in the road, and also bear any costs incurred in closing the road.

Frys have also offered land near Bridge Road to the council free of charge for the proposed widening of Christchurch Road. The offer has been accepted.

Source: Mitcham News & Mercury, 13th May, 1966, page 1.

Occupants in 1939

1, Leonard Douglas and Elizabeth HAYNES
2, Mary Jane and Rosa FISK
3, William Charles and Alice Louisa and Christopher ADAMS
4, James and Maude BURLING
5, Robert and Gertrude MARSHALL
6, Alfred and Mabel Frances FORD
7, Robert and Doris May TAYLOR; Edith Mahala FRISWELL
8, James Alfred and Sarah Ellen DURLING
9, Henry William and Rose Florence and Florance DALTON
10, Ernest John and Flora BURLING
11, Charles Walter and Susan FRANCIS


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Randalls (Wimbledon) Ltd.

Watts Yard
Upper Green East

Sugar Confectionery


Source:
Borough of Mitcham List of Factories,
Town Clerk’s Department,
July 1963.
Available at Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.
Reference L2 (670) MIT


The location of Randalls was described on the Facebook Mitcham History Group as between Turners the bakers and where the locksmiths is now. This puts the location of Watts Yard to be between 39 and 41 Upper Green East.


News Articles

FIRE AT SWEET FACTORY

Firemen fought for three hours early on Wednesday morning to control a blaze at the Mitcham sweet factory of Randalls (Wimbledon) Limited.

The fire started just after 2 a.m. when sacks of peanut husks stored in the yard of the firm’s premises at Upper Green East overheated and caught alight.

The flames quickly spread to the roof timbers of the toilet block, against which the husks were stacked.

A storeroom of the adjacent South Suburban Co-operative shop also caught alight and roof timbers and a door were burned. Some stock was damaged by smoke.

A spokesman for Randalls said that it was too early to estimate the cost of the damage.

Source: Mitcham News & Mercury, 21st January, 1966

Lester & Cann, Ltd.

Cloth weaving factory

Menin Works
Bond Road

Ad from 1966:Text of ad:

LESTER & CANN LTD.
(Modern Cloth Weaving Factory)
MENIN WORKS, BOND ROAD, MITCHAM, SURREY

Due to expansion the following personnel are required. Experienced or trainee staff will be considered for all positions.

MEN

1. MACHINE MINDERS FOR CIRCULAR KNITTING MACHINES (shift work).
2. YOUNG MEN FOR STEAM PROCESSING OPERATION IN FINISHING DEPARTMENT.

WOMEN

1. INVISIBLE MENDERS.
2. CLOTH EXAMINERS FOR FINAL INSPECTION.

MODERN FACTORY, GOOD CONDITIONS. EXCELLENT PAY WHEN FULLY TRAINED.

This is a unique opportunity to join an associate company within
the Courtaulds Group, as any vacancies are filled very quickly.

Telephone No.: MITcham 1076.