Tag Archives: Park Place

Albert Thomas Till, Medical Officer for Health at Mitcham

16th July 1936. Dr Till, with the Mayoress, Mrs Davies, at a ‘Welfare Centres ‘ garden party at Park Place. Clip from Merton Memories photo, reference Mit_​Hospitals_​4-1

In the 1935 Medical Directory he is listed as living at 43, Mitcham Park.

In 1924 he obtained his degree as Batchelor of Medicine / Batchelor of Surgery and a Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene; and post-graduated with Dental Public Health in 1931 at the University of London. He was a Fellow of the Royal Institute of Public Health, and the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

He was the Medical Officer at the Mission Hospital in Mahamba, Swaziland; and the Resident Medical Officer at the Victoria Hospital in Damascus, Syria.

He authored Dental caries in native children, published in the South African Medical Journal in 1927; Some observations on influenza in 1933 and Liquid paraffin, a cause of loss of weight in children, in 1934, both in the Journal of State Medicine.

He was appointed Mitcham Medical Officer for Health in 1937.

Injured during bombing raid on 12th November, 1940, at 31 Mitcham Park, he died the same day at Wilson Hospital. He was 40 years old.

From Norwood News – Friday 15 November 1940, page 2:

Obituary
TRAGIC DEATH OF DR. TILL
Medical Officer of Health at Mitcham

THE tragic death of Dr. A. T. Till, Medical Officer of Health for Mitcham, has cut short a promising career at the comparatively early age of 40 years.

He was a native of South Africa, and came to Mitcham 3 1/2 years ago, when he was temporarily appointed for six months’ trial to succeed the late Dr. Fegen, who then was a part-time officer of health. By the end of his term, Dr. Till had given such complete satisfaction, that be was unanimously given the full-time post of medical officer. That he justified that confidence is recognised everywhere. Year by year he endeared himself more and more to the Council, his colleagues, and the ratepayers generally, and he came to be regarded as one of the most popular of Mitcham’s public servants. Unostentatious at all times, Dr. Till wielded a great influence throughout the borough, and improved the health services to a remarkable extent.

A prominent Council official paid him this tribute: “Dr. Till was a first-class officer,” he said. “Exceedingly capable, and most popular with the whole of the public services. Ever ready to give advice, it could be absolutely relied unon. The Council has lost one of its best and most conscientious officers.”

A sad coincidence is that normally he would have been on duty elsewhere on the night of his death, but he had arranged an exchange with a professional colleague. During the war period, Dr. Till had been in charge of the ambulance and first aid posts. In addition to his ordinary duties, and he worked unceasingly for the benefit of the public services.

The Mayor (Ald. E.J.D. Field) is calling a special meeting of the Council for to-morrow (Saturday) to pay tribute to Dr. Till’s memory, and to place on record an appreciation of his services.

Dr. Till leaves a widow and daughter to mourn their irreparable loss.

Commonwealth war Grave Commission casualty record.

In his will, he left £909 3s. 7d. to his widow Emily Annie Till (around £50,000 in 2019 values).

Sources:
Wellcome Trust; London, England; Collection: The Medical Directory, 1935; Reference: b21330724_i13766260

1919 plan for Park Place by the YMCA

A letter from the YMCA to the Mitcham & Tooting Mercury in 1919 sets out their plan for Park Place.

THE MITCHAM PARK PLACE SCHEME.

To the Editor of “ The Mercury.”

Sir,

The following is a rough outline of the scheme which we hope to carry out at Park Place.

Park Place and grounds is a very large house, standing in about eleven acres of ground. There are two large meadows, a tennis court, lawns, part of which will be used as a bowling green, a large garden and orchard. In the main part of the building there are five rooms upstairs, which we hope to run as a hostel for about ten men and there is also a large room which will be used as a games room. Downstairs we have arranged for a restaurant, ’billiard room and a music room and library, and a private room for the exclusive and permanent use of the secretary of the National Federation of Discharged and Demobilised Sailors and Soldiers. To satisfy the one need of a large hall for concerts, lectures and other activities, we hope to transfer the hut in the hospital to these grounds as soon as it is not required at the hospital.

We are planning to carry out a very extensive social and sports programme, and we hope to form cricket, football, tennis, bowling, quoits and boxing clubs, to hold frequent sports meetings and to arrange billiard tournaments and to organise whist drives. We expect to be able to carry out an educational programme by arranging lectures and classes and study circles and by running a library. On Saturday afternoons and evenings in the summer, we shall try to arrange al fresco teas and concerts on the lawn, and on Sunday afternoons it is my hope that, in co-operation with the religious denominations in Mitcham, we shall be able to arrange for some sort of united religious service.

As the Mitcham Golf Course is so near we may find it possible to form a golf club. In addition to those activities, which we can arrange for ourselves, I am sure it will be possible for us to secure well-known concert parties, lecturers and demonstrations in all kinds of sport by well-known amateurs and professionals.

There will be an advisory committee formed from the members of the club and then I hope that we shall be able to form a ladies’ auxiliary committee. Mrs. Cato Worsfold, whose splendid work in connection with the hospital hut, is well known, has kindly consented to be president of this committee, and Miss Holden will be the secretary. This committee will be responsible for recruiting and organising ladies’ voluntary assistance. While on this question, I would like to throw out a strong appeal to the gentlemen of the district to associate themselves with the club and to assist us in every possible way to form the various sports clubs.

Such is the bare outline of the different activities, which we hope to carry out here. A thousand other things suggest themselves. My own feeling is that here we have a magnificent opportunity to build up a strong social and sports club, which will be the very centre of social activities in Mitcham, and in regard to sport, an organisation which can become a real power house in the realm of amateur athletics. Now, this can only lie done by utilising every ounce of local support. We must all pull the same way with the same ideals. There is no resident in Mitcham who cannot contribute in service and subscription (I put service first).

Now a word as to membership. All men over the age of sixteen years will be admitted to the buildings and grounds free. Perhaps, I may put in a word here on the position of the Mitcham branch of the Discharged and Demobilised Sailors and Soldiers Federation. For the permanent and exclusive use as an office and committee room of the federation, one of the rooms downstairs has been set aside. For the ordinary activities of the scheme, members of the Federation will become members of the Red Triangle Club. The federation will be allowed the exclusive use, not more than twice a week, of one or more of the large rooms for the purposes of general meetings, Federation whist drives, small concerts, etc. The whole catering arrangements will always be in the hands of the Y.M.C.A.

Every man wishing to use the club will be given a membership ticket which will entitle him to one month’s free membership. At the expiration of this period this card may be renewed to extend over a period not exceeding twelve months. My idea is that if it proves financially possible to do so, we should endeavour to put these clubs on the same basis as the Y.M.C.A. huts. They should be open to all men at all times free of charge. Later on it may be necessary — indeed the numbers themselves may require it — for us to charge a small membership fee. The different sports clubs will, of course, have their own membership fees. This will be fixed by the members of the clubs themselves. The only regulations enforced in regard to the formation of these clubs will be those applying to the particular kind of sport and a very strict rule prohibiting any form of gambling.

Now, a word as to the admission of ladies. We would like very much to carry out a joint work for both sexes, but unfortunately our space will not permit this at the moment. I think that we can and should arrange for the ladies to join our sports clubs, especially the tennis club, and that the members of the club should be encouraged to bring their wives and lady friends to the concerts, whist drives, and the Saturday afternoon al fresco concerts and teas.

Men and women have grown to love healthy club life and if every spare shilling and every spare hour were spent in the establishment of these clubs, I am convinced that a great many of our social problems would disappear. Men and women to-day are waiting for the opportunity to serve their fellows as much as to be served.

As to the opening. The formal opening has been arranged to take place on Saturday, the 10th May. at 5.15 p.m. Dr. T. Cato Worsfold, M.P., has kindly consented to occupy the chair on this occasion. Sir Arthur K. Yapp, K.B.E., will speak on the after-war programme of the Y.M.C.A. It is hoped to secure the presence of a well known personage. On the 10th May the house and grounds will be thrown open to the public from 2.30 p.m., and teas will be served in the grounds from 3.30 p.m. at popular prices. As this will be the occasion of the formal entry of the Mitcham Branch of the National Federation of Discharged and Demobilised Sailors and Soldiers, a demonstration will be made by ex-service men before the opening ceremony. The Secretary and members of the local branch are busy arranging a procession which will march round Mitcham headed by bands. The Y.M.C.A. extends to everyone a hearty invitation to attend this important function.

I am, yours sincerely,
Thos. B. Scotcher.
Resident Secretary.

Park Place,
Mitcham.

Source: Mitcham & Tooring Mercury, 2nd May, 1919 page 5

1910 Antipodean Visitors to Lower Mitcham School

ANTIPODEAN VISITORS.
MR. AND MRS. WALKER, OF MITCHAM, AUSTRALIA, AT MITCHAM.

Two interesting visitors on Tuesday were Councillor and Mrs. Walker, of Mitcham, in the State of Victoria, Australia, who came to have a look at the day schools and receive a Union Jack and a case of essences, with which they were officially presented on Empire Day. That ceremony was reported in the “Advertiser.” but it may be well to recall the principal facts. On that day the school children gathered at Park-place to welcome Mr. and Mrs. Walker, who came the authorised representatives the State school of Mitcham, Victoria, to present an Australian flag, a sprig of eucalyptus, and photographs to the managers. It was an interesting event, and the visitors were favourably impressed with what they saw. But they had no opportunity then of inspecting the schools with the children at work, and they were invited to return later on.

So it came about that on Tuesday morning they were met at Mitcham Junction Station by Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Chart, with whom they drove to the Lower Mitcham School, after short stay the way at the Roman Catholic School facing the Green. They arrived at lower Mitcham as the scholars were at play, and were able to see them under the most natural conditions. While Mr. Walker expressed himself as delighted with the discipline he could hardly fail to notice the miserable way many of the boys were shod. Several, in fact, were not shod at all, and were running about with bare feet and the most ragged of clothes.

At the end of play time the boys filed into the large hall of their department, where the headmaster, Mr. Clarke, introduced to them Mr. Walker and his wife, mentioning the circumstances under which they paid their previous visit.

Mr. Walker, in the course of a few words to the audience, said he was delighted to be present and to renew his acquaintance with the teachers and scholars. He was glad to find the school in such splendid condition, and the scholars with such a happy and healthy appearance. Particularly was he pleased to see them at play, and to notice the attention they paid to the headmaster’s whistle. As they grew up he hoped they would always be regardful in the same manner of the authority that they might serve. It was a credit to the headmaster to find them so well trained, as it was to the boys themselves. As he looked round he was inclined to think that they had not all equal opportunities, but during his journeys in England he had come to understand that everybody had an equal chance, and it depended upon them as to what they would do with the opportunities that were given to them. He knew what boys’ difficulties were and what they had to do; but now was the greatest opportunity of their lives, and they should make the most it. Then he told them that they belonged to a great Empire, and would have their place in it when they grew up; and, in conclusion, he wished them all happy future and hoped that the district would have reason to be proud to know that some of them had risen to fill high positions in the commercial and political world.

The boys responded to these sentiments with three ringing cheers.

Mr. Clarke declined to take himself all the credit for the discipline the school, which he said was largely due to his assistants. They thanked Mr. Walker very much for coming, and hoped that the boys would bear in mind something of what he had said.

Shortly afterwards the party left for the Singlegate Schools, where the Union Jack in an oak box and the case of distilled essences of lavender, peppermint, and other products of Mitcham, given by Mr. R. A. Bush’s firm, were presented to Mr. Walker. He and Mrs. Walker had lunch with Mr. R. M. Chart, and later in the day returned to London. They expect to leave for Australia next week by way of New York and Vancouver, arriving home at the beginning of December.

Source: Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 17 September 1910 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)