Tag Archives: 1928

W.E. Horsman, Son & Co., Iron Foundry in Eveline Road

William Ernest Horsman’s iron foundry that was at 34 Eveline Road, possibly between 1924 and 1938.

Photo taken 20th August 2109.

Listed in the 1924 commercial directory as W.E. Horsman & Co., general engineers.

In the 1930 commercial directory it is listed W.E. Horsman & Co., general engineers, Eveline Road, trading as “ Horseman, Ironfounders ; ” Telephone number MIT 1586. Note the spelling of Horseman with an ‘e’.

The foundry is listed in the 1938 directory as May’s Mitcham Foundry.

The use of ‘Son’ on the manhole cover shown above suggests that it was made between 1930 and 1938. The 1932 robbery refers to the offices of Messrs. W. E. Horsman, Son and Co., whereas the 1930 directory doesn’t mention ‘Son’.

From Ancestry.com, Stanley Bertram Horsman, foundry manager, was married on 9th February 1932 in Sutton. His father was named as William Ernest Horsman, occupation Ironfounder. Electoral registers show W.E. Horsman as living at 1 Greenhill, Sutton.


News Articles and Ads
Norwood News – Friday 12 February 1932

MITCHAM ROBBERY DAMAGE AND LOSS AT OFFICES

A daring robbery was successfully carried out early on Tuesday morning at the offices of Messrs. W. E. Horsman, Son and Co., iron founders and sanitary engineers, Eveline-roud. Mitcham. The front office door was forced with a jemmy, and evidently the thieves spent several hours ransacking the whole place. They attacked three safes, ripping the back out of one. Papers and documents were ruthlessly thrown all over the floors, and considerable damage done to the property. Thecentents of all three safes were emptied, and all the loose money and stamps taken away. All the workmen’s Health and Insurance cards are missing, also all the money in the hospital collection boxes.

Mr. Horsman told one of our reporters: “I don’t know whether my son’s wedding had anything to do with the robbery, but it was well known that my son, who is works manager, was being married on Tuesday. Possibly the thieves thought there might be more here, and we should not be so particular in removing things on such an occasion. We have proof that there were at least two men on the job. They must have spent hours about it. What a mess they left! It troubles me more, the damage and mess, than all the money they took. I should estimate the loss and damage at quite a hundred pounds. The collection boxes for the hospital and blind were broken open and the money taken. They found the key for the big safe, but the other two they broke open. It must have taken them hours to do that. From the appearance of the floor in my office, they attacked the safes in one corner, where a light would not be so easily seen from outside. What puzzles me is what good the workmen’s Insurance and Health cards will do them, unless they are negotiable. I understand the police have obtained some finger-prints.”

Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer – Monday 14 October 1929

WANTED at once Iron Moulders, for jobbing shop: permanency for good men.—Write Horsman’s Foundry, Eveline Road, Mitcham.


The Sanitary Inspectors Report of June 4th, 1928, included complaints by local residents:

Several complaints have recently been made by residents in Eveline Crescent and Eveline Road of the nuisance from smoke and fumes from Messrs. Horsman’s Iron Foundry. I have kept observation on the works, and I find the fumes from the cupolas in which metals are heated are very strong. I have not seen much smoke, but, according to my reading of the new Smoke Act, these works are exempt from the operation of the Act.

Source: page 99, Mitcham Urban District Council minutes, volume XIV 1928-29.

Framfield Road

Framfield Road is off the west side of Streatham Road opposite The Driftway. It leads into St James’s Road. The reason for the name is unknown, however next to it is Uckfield Grove, and the town of Uckfield in Sussex has a town of Framfield two miles to the east of it.

Possibly built around 1928 as in that year mortgages were provided by the Mitcham Urban District Council, under the Small Dwellings Acquisitions Act, for houses valued at £625 each.

As approached from the Streatham Road end, the houses on the left are arranged in blocks of six, numbered odd from 1 to 107. On the right side the houses are numbered even from 2 to 88. Extra houses were built on plots near the St James’s Road end that had garages. A number of houses have since been divided into flats.

The Royal Mail website says that there three postcodes in use in this road, namely CR4 2AL, 2AU and 2AW.


News Items

From the Manchester Evening News – Monday 11th January 1943, via the British Newspaper Archive

Home Guard Fell in River At Night

While two Home Guards were patrolling on the Thames quayside at Wandsworth, one of them, William Edward Field (41), of Framfield Road, Mitcham, fell into the river in the darkness and was drowned.

At the Battersea inquest to-day the Coroner (Mr. Hervey Wyatt) recorded a verdict of accidental death. He said that Field’s companion, Ernest William Horsman, who climbed down a wire and made two unsuccessful rescue attempts, had every reason to congratulate himself on his fine effort to help his friend.

According to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission entry for W.E. FIELD, he was in the 52nd County of London (Wandsworth Gas Co.) Battalion of the Home Guard. He was the son of Edward and Daisy Field, of Mitcham and husband of Elsie Catherine Field, of Mitcham. Although his grave is in the London Road Cemetery, it is not in the ‘War Graves’ section that has the graves of the local Home Guard that died in 1941. It is in plot 9, which is near the Victoria Road entrance.

Edward Pullen gets MBE in 1961 but missed DCM in 1916

1928 : Pigs starved to death

From the Norwood News of Friday 29th June 1928, via the British Newspaper Archive:

PIGS STARVED TO DEATH.
`APPALLING CRUELTY’ AT MITCHAM.
STOKER SENT TO PRISON.

” The evidence is quite clear. You have been guilty of most appalling cruelty. All the magistrates are agreed that they never heard a more revolting case. You will have to go to hard labour for six weeks.”

Sir Arthur Spurgeon, chairman of the Croydon County Bench, made these remarks on Wednesday to XXXX, of 249, Church-road, Mitcham, who was summoned on four informations for, being the owner of ten pigs, he permitted and caused unnecessary suffering to them by unreasonably omitting to supply them with food and water at Batsworth-road Allotment Grounds on May 12.

Mr. E. B. Knight, prosecuting, said defendant was employed at the Mitcham Gas Works as a stoker, at a salary of £4 13s. 6d. per week. About three years ago he built some pig sties on his allotment plot at Batsworth-road, and began keeping pigs. On May 12, the sties were inspected by Mr. Rabbetts, the Council’s Nuisance Inspector, who found ten pigs in an absolutely starving condition. In addition, there were the remains of three other pigs which had died, or been killed, and the remains had been eaten by the other pigs.

LEGS PARTLY EATEN.

In one sty there were a sow and two small pigs, and the carcase of a small pig with the back legs partly eaten away, and the skin and remains of another pig. There were six small pigs in the second sty, and the bones of another. In the third sty there was one sow. There should have been 14 pigs altogether. The carcases of three were there, but where the fourth was they did not know.

The great probability was that no food or water had been given to the pigs for about three weeks. They had been shockingly neglected. In the tub or tank there were potato peelings covered with scum not fit for pigs or anything else.

” CALLOUS INDIFFERENCE.”

” It is difficult to understand,” added Mr. Knight, “how anyone could let these pigs starve to death in this unaccountable way. The whole of the stock had to be destroyed. Inspector Scott saw defendant, who told him that, some soap had got into the wash and given the pigs scaldings, which had upset them. A more callous indifference to the suffering of animals could hardly be conceived. When Inspector Scott asked defendant when he had last brought food, the reply was, “I do not know. I have been saving the wash from the house to save expense.”

The particulars given by Mr. Knight as to the condition of the pigs were substantiated by Mr. C. E. Rabbetts, chief sanitary inspector for Mitcham U.D. Council.

Inspector Scott also corroborated.

” 3 WEEKS WITHOUT FOOD.”

Mr. Richard Herbert Evans, a veterinary surgeon, said the pigs had been without food or water for quite three weeks. It was possible for the pigs to have killed the weak ones and eaten their carcases. The entire stock were in too weak and emaciated a condition to have been fit for human consumption, and would never have recovered. The five months’ old pigs, which should have weighed about 85 lbs., were only 20 lbs.; and the seven months, which should have weighed about 120 lbs., were only 30 lbs. The animals must have endured intense suffering.

ACCUSED’S STATEMENT.

Defendant said he could only put it down to a long run of bad luck, and to the fact he had been feeling very unwell. He had sustained big losses with pigkeeping, and became so depressed and worried that he did not know what be was doing. He was vary sorry.

On hearing the sentence, defendant exclaimed, ” I hope you will save me from prison for the sake of my wife and children.”

Sir Arthur: You should have thought of that before.

Mitcham Park

Mitcham Park is a road that runs from off the south side of Cricket Green by the Mitcham Police station, and connects to the east side of the London Road, north of the former Mitcham railway station.

As of 2018, Royal Mail lists four postcodes for this road:

CR4 4EN : odd numbers 1 to 31
CR4 4EG : even numbers 2 to 32 and East Lodge
CR4 4EP : odd numbers 29 to 59
CR4 4EJ : even numbers 34 to 106.

The block of flats on the corner with London Road, was built on the site of 389, 391 and 393 London Road in 2005/6. The block consist of 28 flats, and it was given the address of 59 Mitcham Park. See planning permission 04/P2012.

1953 OS map

Other OS maps below show the development of the road.
1894
1910
1933

An auction in 1902 describes the two semi-detached houses on the west side of Mitcham park: from the South London Press – Saturday 09 August 1902, via the British Newspaper Archives.

Close to Mitcham Common – TWO PAIRS of semi-detached ViLLAS, known as Nos. 1, 3, 5, and 7, Mitcham Park. Each house contains five bed rooms, two reception rooms, kitchen, and usual offices. No. 1 let at £60 per annum. Nos. 5 and 7 let at £55 per annum each. No. 9 will be sold with the advantage of vacant possession, but of the estimated rental value of £60 per annum, at which rental it now Iet. Lease about 90 years; ground rent £8 each.

Douglas Young & co. will sell the above by AUCTION, at the Mart, E.C., on Wednesday, September 10, 1902, at 2 o’clock precisely. Particulars and conditions of sale may be obtained at the Mart. E.C : of the Solicitors, Messrs. GEDGE, KIRBY, & MILLETT. 11, Great George-street. Westminster: or of the Auctioneers, 51, Coleman-street. K.C., and 213, Clapham-road. S.W.

These aerial photos of the houses show their single, high pitch roof which differs from the other houses that have double-pitched roofs.

Semis 1 & 3, and 5 & 7, Mitcham Park

West side of Mitcham park, from number 1 at the top to number 19 and the bottom

Occupants

1904
West Side
1, Miss COLES
5, John Marsh PITT
7, George BRIDGE
15, Rev. John EDGELL
19, William W. THOMSON
33, Hugh Knight
37, Reginald Pocock BARROW
39, Charles OGDEN
43, Evans FAWCUS
47, Joseph BEARDMORE
53, James W. BOWDING
55, Col. Ernest GRATTAN

East Side

East Lodge, James JOHNSON
2, Felix Andre Jules MOYSE
6, Francis Ringler THOMSON
10, P.A. LEON
12, Mrs HARVIE
14, A.I. SUCKLING-BARON
16, Arthur Ernest ANWYL
22, Miss ANDERSON
26, Arthur Henry BALFOUR
28, Alfred MILLER
32, Wilson ALDWINCKLE

Note that all of these houses, from 15 to 55, and 2 to 32, are of the same design, namely double-pitched roofs with square-U layout to rear.

1953 OS map

This map of 1894 shows the land around Mitcham Hall where Mitcham Park was built, up to Jeppos Lane.

1894 OS map

The land was auctioned in the same year, as listed in the Willesden Chronicle – Saturday 12 May 1894, via the British Newspaper Archive.

In a marquee on the Estate, on MONDAY, June 1, 40 Plots, first portion of the Mitcham Park Estate, adjoining the railway station, and in the centre of the town, fronting on the main road from London to Epsom.

Also, in one lot, the Freehold family Mansion, known as Mitcham Hall, with its beautifully-timbered pleasure grounds and gardens of five acres, and two excellent semi-detached villas.

Vender’s Solicitors. Messrs. Gedge, Kirby, and Millett, 1, Old Palace-yard, S.W.; Architect and Surveyor, W. Mac Thompson, Esq., Holly – cottage, Mitcham

This 1910 map shows the square U-shaped houses that were built:

1910 OS map

The 1933 map shows further development of smaller houses along the south side of the road, and between the gaps on the north / west side.

1933 OS map

News Articles

From the Western Daily Press – Friday 16 August 1935:

The birth of a son at Mitcham Park, Mitcham, to Mrs Winifred Freeman — Miss Polly Ward, the revue actress and dancer is announced.

Mrs Freeman is the only daughter of Miss Winifred Ward, the principal boy, and granddaughter of the late Will Poluski, the Victorian comedian. She was married in 1928 to Mr Robert Sydney Freeman, ” the hero of her schooldays.”

Advert from Norwood News – Friday 20 February 1953

WANTED. Teacher, preparatory school for boys and girls. 6 to 7 1/2

Clarendon Preparatory School, 17 Mitcham Park, Mitcham. Tel. Mitcham. 1444

The widow of the Reverend Lipshytz lived at number 6.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Suffragette Stories

From the collection of Suffragette articles on the British Newspaper Archives, where Mitcham is mentioned.

If more evidence were necessary in support of the Public Places (Order) Bill, it could be supplied by the case of a Mitcham woman, Mrs. Brennar, who was recently arrested for ” insulting behaviour ” and locked in a cell at Bow Street.

Mrs. Brennar, to avoid the peril of standing still in a bitter wind and freezing temperature actually dared to ” walk up and down,” while waiting in the Strand to meet her husband! This seems to have been enough to convince the police that she was a woman of loose morals and she was taken into custody.

In spite of her protests she was not discharged until brought before a magistrate.

Source: Common Cause – Friday 27 March 1931 from the British Newspaper Archive

More Women County Councillors.

Two more women have been elected as members of County Councils, bringing the number of women serving on County Councils to 148. Mrs. Chuter Ede, who has just been returned to the Surrey Council, by a majority of 422, was the nominee of the undivided Labour party. Her opponent was the former chairman of the Urban District Council. She is the first woman to represent the Mitcham Division, and the fifth on the Council. The Duchess of Richmond and Gordon has succeeded Colonel Hankey on the West Sussex Council, and is the fourth woman to be returned to this Authority.

Source: Common Cause – Friday 07 December 1928 from the British Newspaper Archive

A reception is being given at Mitcham Hall, Surrey, on September 30th, by Miss Millington and Miss Hurlston, to meet Mrs. Bedford Fenwick, and to welcome home the nurses who served in the Greco-Turkish war.

Source: Woman’s Signal – Thursday 30 September 1897 from the British Newspaper Archive

A subscription is required to access these articles on the BNA.

Plummer Lane

Road running north-westerly from Bond Road and Eveline Road.

Possibly built by H. Paulson in around 1926/7. A terrace of six houses on each side of the road, numbered odd on the west side, as 1 to 11 going north, and even on the east side 2 to 12. Royal Mail postcode lookup in 2017 shows 13 properties in CR4 3HR, with the addition of 2A.

1951 OS map

From the minutes of the Mitcham Urban District Council, Highways and Buildings Committee, on 7th November, 1929, page 469, the residents of Plummer Lane had written to the council asking for it to be renamed. The council said that:

the name was originally suggested to perpetuate the name of the Plummer family, who had left certain moneys for the benefit of the parish, which moneys are included in the sum administered by the Trustees of the Mitcham United Charities. … the residents were to be informed that the Committee saw no adequate reason for any change.

Thomas Plummer’s charity was created out of his will of 1641. Bread was to be handed out by the parish church, every Sunday, to the local poor. Source: Reports of the Commissioners Appointed in Pursuance of Acts of … concerning Charities and Education of The Poor, Volume 33.


News Articles

Dundee Evening Telegraph – Thursday 30 August 1928 (via the British Newspaper archive)

GIRL DRAGGED ALONG BY MOTOR CAR MUDGUARD.

As an ambulance was returning along London Road, Mitcham, with an accident case the driver, E. Hedger, heard a bump, and saw in his mirror a girl being carried along on the mudguard of a motor car that had just passed him. He stopped the ambulance, and picked up Hettie Sinclair, of Plummer Lane, Mitcham, who after stepping off a tramcar was caught by the motor car.

“It is my 14th birthday to-day,” she said as she was being taken to a doctor for treatment. She was taken home in the ambulance.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

Miss Betty Homan of The Canons

Miss Betty Homan

Miss Betty Homan

TO BE PRESENTED AT THE COURT TO-NIGHT, MAY 23 MISS BETTY HOMAN. Miss Betty Homan is the younger daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Homan, of The Canons, Mitcham, and is a beautiful blonde. She is being presented at the Court to-night, May 23, by her godmother, Mrs. Lester Reid, the wife of Lieut. -Col. Lester Reid. of Thorpe Mandeville Manor, Banbury.

Source: The Sketch – Wednesday 23 May 1928 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)