Tag Archives: 1904

Commonside West

Road from Upper Green East towards the junction with Madeira Road. Buildings are on one side only, as the other side is Three Kings Piece, which is a part of Mitcham Common. An exception being the sports changing rooms opposite Madeira Road.

Houses are numbered sequentially, from 1 (Newton House) to 72, which is part of the News of the World Houses. Between the Cold Blows footpath and the entrance to Park Places is currently only the Windmill pub and Merton Sea Cadets, but there were houses near the pub. Numbers 51 and 52 were demolished in 1967.

c.1900 : Newton House on the right in this clip from Merton Memories photo reference Mit_​2_​10-9 copyright London Borough of Merton

Occupants from Street Directories
Listed below in order from the Upper Green towards Madeira Road. The beer retailer referred to in these listings is for the Windmill pub.

1896
This directory lists the road as Mitcham Common (west side), and Cold Blows is shown as St Mary’s Avenue, which was a temporary renaming of that footpath.

John RICHENS (Newton House)
William WILLIAMSON (Holly Cottage)
Mrs SAHLER (Maori Cottage)
Christopher ROBINSON (The Lawn)
William BARNES, engineer
Mrs Lilian IRLAND, music teacher
Mrs DREWETT senior
Thomas GARDNER, furniture dealer

…. here is St Mary’s Avenue

Thomas Bodle LAWRENCE (Avenue Cottage)
James BROOKSON
James SAYERS, beer retailer
Charles GOULD
George SAWYER
John THOMPSON, diaryman
William F.J. SIMPSON (Park Place)

1904

John RICHENS (Newton House)
William Rutherford McLEOD (Holly Cottage)
William James DICKISSON (Trent Cottage)
Charles LESTER (The Lawn)
William BARNES, engineer
Thomas LAWSON, shopkeeper
Alfred GARDNER, furniture dealer

PILLAR LETTER BOX

…. here is Cold Blows

Thomas LAWRENCE
Miss SHEPHERD
Alexander Tully GRANT, beer retailer
John THOMPSON, diaryman
William F.J. SIMPSON (Park Place)

1911

Mrs RICHENS (Newton House)
William Rutherford McLEOD (Holly Cottage)
William James DICKISSON (Trent Cottage)
Charles LESTER (The Lawn)
William Howard BARNES, confectioner
William BARNES, engineer
Thomas LAWSON, shopkeeper
Alfred GARDNER, furniture dealer

LAMP POST LETTER BOX

…. here is Cold Blows

Thomas LAWRENCE, decorator
Miss SHEPHERD
Henry Edward CLISBY, beer retailer
John THOMPSON, diaryman
William F.J. SIMPSON (Park Place)

1915

Mrs RICHENS (Newton House)
William Rutherford McLEOD (Holly Cottage)
Ernest Frederick GOERING (The Nook)
Charles LESTER (The Lawn)
Mrs TURNER (Meriden)
Frank JAMES (Allesley)
William Howard BARNES, confectioner
William BARNES, engineer
George Frederick LOCKYER
Alfred E. GARDNER, furniture dealer

LAMP POST LETTER BOX

…. here is Cold Blows

Thomas LAWRENCE, decorator
James JORDAN
James BOXALL, beer retailer
John THOMPSON, diaryman
William F.J. SIMPSON (Park Place)

1925
Note that Cold Blows is not named as such, but is shown as ‘footpath to Lower Green’ i.e. the cricket green

Thomas George BAKER, builder (Newton House)
William Rutherford McLEOD (Holly Cottage)
Charles LESTER (The Lawn)
Alfred DREWITT (Fernhurst)
Mrs TURNER (Meriden)
Henry Willam ORFORD (Allesley)
William H. BARNES (Malvern)
William BARNES
George Frederick LOCKYER (The Cottage)
Alfred Ernest GARDNER, furniture dealer (Homeside)

.. footpath to Lower green ..

George Oliver NASH (North Lodge)
Lawrence Thomas BODLE, builder (Avenue Cottage)
James JORDAN
Alfred KILLICK
Harry LOCK
George WEST
Benjamin HILLS
Thomas HIGGS, confectioner
James BOXALL, beer retailer
Charles Thomas SEARS
George SAWYER
Mrs ODELL
John THOMPSON, dairy
William Charles HINES
News of the World Sports Ground (Leonard WHITE, hon. sec.) (Park Place)

In the 1938 commercial directory, T.G. BAKER is listed as builder at no. 1 Commonside West, telephone number 2915.

1936 clip from Tom Francis photo of Albert Ernest Gardner’s furniture stores, from Merton Memories phot reference Mit_​2_​10-11 copyright London Borough of Merton.

In the 1912 directory, Alfd. E. Gardner, Common side west, is listed as a manager of the Zion Congregational School.

Tyrell’s Poultry Farm

A poultry farm that was in Gorringe Park.

According to Eric Montague, writing about St Barnabas church in his Mitcham Histories : 2 North Mitcham, page, 109:

During preparation of the site for the new church what remained of Gorringe Park stables, then known as Tyrell’s Farm, was demolished.

He also said that a clock, removed from one of the old farm buildings, was installed in the church tower through the generosity of Joseph Wilson and his wife, who were living at Gorringe Park House at the same time as the church was built.

The 1904 street directory describes Gorringe Park Avenue as walked from the London Road:

…. here is Bruce Road
Charles FROST (Gorringe Park Lodge)

Christ Church Church Room

Christleib T. LIPSHYTZ (Gorringe Park House)

The Surrey & Sussex Poultry Farm Limited

Arnold & Arnold, veterinary surgeons (Gorringe Park)

The spelling of the surname differs in the 1910 electoral register, which shows William TYRRELL at Poultry farm, Gorringe park. Henry TYRELL is shown at 5 Thirsk Road.

The 1911 street directory, also described from west to east, now shows William Tyrell poultry farm:

…. here is Bruce Road
St Barnabas District Mission Church

St Barnabas’ Men’s Club (W.G. WOODWARD, hon. sec.)

Reverend Christleib T. LIPSHYTZ (Gorringe Park House)

William TYRELL poultry farm

Arnald & Arnald, veterinary surgeons (Gorringe Park)

This can be compared to the 1911 OS map:

1911 OS map

The assumption then is that field numbers 574 and/or 575 were the locations of the poultry farm, with 571 being the vets.

The path that is shown between Gorringe Park House and the poultry farm is followed today by the course of Edenvale Road, as shown on the georeferenced OS map on the NLS website:


During World War 1, three members of the Tyrell family were called up and went to the Military Service Tribunal to ask for exemption. Reports of the tribunals in local newspapers have been summarised by the Merton Historical Society

3rd March 1916

“My business, run under agreement, cannot be run without my supervision,” wrote Mr. Albert Tyrell, aged 31 years, keeping a poultry farm at Mitcham, and who is a pig breeder and butcher at Streatham.
Claim for exemption was disallowed.

Leonard Tyrell, 28, a poultry farm keeper and pig breeder, whose mother is dependent on him, claimed total exemption but was only given a month.

8th September 1916

John William Tyrell, 23, a pig and poultry dealer, was quite unable to get anyone to carry on his business if he went. This was his fourth Tribunal appearance. His father, aged 58, suffered from a strained heart, and had been medically certified as unfit for heavy manual labour. The Chairman thought there was no reason why he should not turn to and do what he could; we were all now doing things that once we had given up doing. One more month, to be final.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Tom Sherman, the fastest bowler of his time

Cricketer who made 82 appearances in first class matches in the 19th century.

Born in Mitcham on 1st December 1825, his father James Sherman was also a cricketer. He died 10th October 1911.

A letter dated 30th November was published in the The Sportsman of Thursday 1st December 1904:

TOM SHEARMAN.

Sir.,

I thought it would be of interest for you and others interested in cricket to know that Mr Tom Sherman attains his seventy-ninth birthday to-morrow. He is the oldest Surrey cricketer, and has the unique distinction of having played continuously for fifty years. His health haring quite failed him, and circumstances for this reason being anything but comfortable, I would be glad if something might be done to make his position a little more comfortable during the winter months. I feel quite sure that some of the older generation who knew him in his famous bowling days would willingly help him if they knew his position.

— Yours, etc.,
Arthur B. Wilkinson.
Studio,
Carlton-gardens,
Lower Green,
Mitcham, November 30.

Source: The British Newspaper Archive

His obituary was reported in the Croydon Guardian and Surrey County Gazette of Saturday 14th October 1911.

TOM SHERMAN DIES AT CROYDON.

A Famous Surrey Cricketer.

The Inquest.

The death of Tom Sherman, of Mitcham, who succumbed at Croydon Hospital, Tuesday, after breaking his leg at Mitcham, leaves William Caffyn the only survivor of a great band of professional cricketers who were in their prime nearly sixty years ago.

In “Scores and Biographies,” Sherman, who was born 1827, is described the as the fastest bowler of his time, and himself recalled the fact that in one of Surrey matches against Yorkshire at Sheffield he broke stump into five pieces. For this feat an admirer gave him a case of razors.

For the greater part of his long life, says “Unknown” in the “Morning Leader,” he lived at Mitcham, one of the famous nurseries of the game, and it was on the village common nine years ago that I last saw Sherman, on the occasion of his annual benefit. It may the vanity of old age to compare the present with the past to the disadvantage of the former, but I remember the wrinkled veteran as very emphatic in expressing an opinion that the bowling in his time was a great deal faster than that of modern days. In the matter of physical power, he believed that Alfred Mynn and himself were considerably ahead of latter-day bowlers when it came to question of pace. “This right knee,” he said, ” was put out as result of a scorching ball from Mynn. and it has never been right since.”

Sherman played for Surrey during eleven or twelve seasons with Julius Caesar, Caffyn, Lockyer, Martingell, and Mortlock. Sherman never bowled against Dr. W. G. Grace, but the man for whom he had the greatest respect as a bat was Fuller Pilch. Sherman dropped out of county cricket when his county were at their best, taking scarcely any part in the great things achieved by the Surrey team under Mr. F. P. Miller, who led the side to victory against All England in 1861. Appearing at Lords in 1846, Sherman met with most success in season the of 1850 and 1851, taking 99 wickets in the course of ten matches during two years. This was before bowling analyses were taken. Described as one of the fastest round-arm bowlers, he earned fame as a contemporary of Alfred Mynn, Fuller Pilch, George Parr, William Caffyn, Felix, and Martingeil. Two months older than Caffyn, Sherman was the oldest professional cricketer living.

Mitcham Park

Mitcham Park is a road that runs from off the south side of Cricket Green by the Mitcham Police station, and connects to the east side of the London Road, north of the former Mitcham railway station.

As of 2018, Royal Mail lists four postcodes for this road:

CR4 4EN : odd numbers 1 to 31
CR4 4EG : even numbers 2 to 32 and East Lodge
CR4 4EP : odd numbers 29 to 59
CR4 4EJ : even numbers 34 to 106.

The block of flats on the corner with London Road, was built on the site of 389, 391 and 393 London Road in 2005/6. The block consist of 28 flats, and it was given the address of 59 Mitcham Park. See planning permission 04/P2012.

1953 OS map

Other OS maps below show the development of the road.
1894
1910
1933

An auction in 1902 describes the two semi-detached houses on the west side of Mitcham park: from the South London Press – Saturday 09 August 1902, via the British Newspaper Archives.

Close to Mitcham Common – TWO PAIRS of semi-detached ViLLAS, known as Nos. 1, 3, 5, and 7, Mitcham Park. Each house contains five bed rooms, two reception rooms, kitchen, and usual offices. No. 1 let at £60 per annum. Nos. 5 and 7 let at £55 per annum each. No. 9 will be sold with the advantage of vacant possession, but of the estimated rental value of £60 per annum, at which rental it now Iet. Lease about 90 years; ground rent £8 each.

Douglas Young & co. will sell the above by AUCTION, at the Mart, E.C., on Wednesday, September 10, 1902, at 2 o’clock precisely. Particulars and conditions of sale may be obtained at the Mart. E.C : of the Solicitors, Messrs. GEDGE, KIRBY, & MILLETT. 11, Great George-street. Westminster: or of the Auctioneers, 51, Coleman-street. K.C., and 213, Clapham-road. S.W.

These aerial photos of the houses show their single, high pitch roof which differs from the other houses that have double-pitched roofs.

Semis 1 & 3, and 5 & 7, Mitcham Park

West side of Mitcham park, from number 1 at the top to number 19 and the bottom

Occupants

1904
West Side
1, Miss COLES
5, John Marsh PITT
7, George BRIDGE
15, Rev. John EDGELL
19, William W. THOMSON
33, Hugh Knight
37, Reginald Pocock BARROW
39, Charles OGDEN
43, Evans FAWCUS
47, Joseph BEARDMORE
53, James W. BOWDING
55, Col. Ernest GRATTAN

East Side

East Lodge, James JOHNSON
2, Felix Andre Jules MOYSE
6, Francis Ringler THOMSON
10, P.A. LEON
12, Mrs HARVIE
14, A.I. SUCKLING-BARON
16, Arthur Ernest ANWYL
22, Miss ANDERSON
26, Arthur Henry BALFOUR
28, Alfred MILLER
32, Wilson ALDWINCKLE

Note that all of these houses, from 15 to 55, and 2 to 32, are of the same design, namely double-pitched roofs with square-U layout to rear.

1953 OS map

This map of 1894 shows the land around Mitcham Hall where Mitcham Park was built, up to Jeppos Lane.

1894 OS map

The land was auctioned in the same year, as listed in the Willesden Chronicle – Saturday 12 May 1894, via the British Newspaper Archive.

In a marquee on the Estate, on MONDAY, June 1, 40 Plots, first portion of the Mitcham Park Estate, adjoining the railway station, and in the centre of the town, fronting on the main road from London to Epsom.

Also, in one lot, the Freehold family Mansion, known as Mitcham Hall, with its beautifully-timbered pleasure grounds and gardens of five acres, and two excellent semi-detached villas.

Vender’s Solicitors. Messrs. Gedge, Kirby, and Millett, 1, Old Palace-yard, S.W.; Architect and Surveyor, W. Mac Thompson, Esq., Holly – cottage, Mitcham

This 1910 map shows the square U-shaped houses that were built:

1910 OS map

The 1933 map shows further development of smaller houses along the south side of the road, and between the gaps on the north / west side.

1933 OS map

News Articles

From the Western Daily Press – Friday 16 August 1935:

The birth of a son at Mitcham Park, Mitcham, to Mrs Winifred Freeman — Miss Polly Ward, the revue actress and dancer is announced.

Mrs Freeman is the only daughter of Miss Winifred Ward, the principal boy, and granddaughter of the late Will Poluski, the Victorian comedian. She was married in 1928 to Mr Robert Sydney Freeman, ” the hero of her schooldays.”

Advert from Norwood News – Friday 20 February 1953

WANTED. Teacher, preparatory school for boys and girls. 6 to 7 1/2

Clarendon Preparatory School, 17 Mitcham Park, Mitcham. Tel. Mitcham. 1444

The widow of the Reverend Lipshytz lived at number 6.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Spring Gardens, Church Road

A terrace of eight houses that were on the western side of Church Road, at the north corner with Aberdeen Road.

1894 OS map

Occupants in the 1896 street directory

1,John SEARS
2,Mrs SMITH
3,Mrs RUSSELL
4,James WHITE
5,Charles WESTERN
6,Joseph SIMMONS
7,Charles EDWARDS
8,Thomas MURRAY

Occupants in the 1904 street directory

1,Edward THOMPSON
2,Mrs SMITH
3,Mrs RUSSELL
4,William HUSSEY
5,Charles WESTERN
6,Alfred KNIGHT
7,Walter WATLING
8,Charles SIVIOUR

The terrace is shown on the 1911 OS map but not listed in the Kelly street directory for that year.

1911 OS map

The terrace of six houses to the north, on the same side of Church Road, is listed as Marrianne Cottages.

The terrace is not shown in the 1952 OS map:

1952 OS map


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Mitcham Cricket Pavilion was opened 18th May 1904

As repoorted in the Sporting Life, the Mitcham Cricket Club president’s wife performed the opening ceremony.

MILITARY CRICKET.
MITCHAM v. HON. ARTILLERY CO.
A NEW PAVILION OPENED.

Since the earliest days of Surrey cricket, Mitcham Green, the scene of yesterday’s match, has been a noted locale. Additional interest was attached to the present fixture, as it was set apart for the opening of the new and commodious pavilion. The ceremony was performed by Mrs. G. J. Poston, wife of the president, in an appropriate speech.

The match, which provided some keen play, resulted in a victory for the home side, eight minutes before the time, by 53 runs. For the winners, W. Hussey was top scorer with 68, which included eleven 4’s: while for the Volunteers W. Stopper had 58, consisting of ten 4’s, and J.D. Gillespie 42 not out. The last-named, who hit six 4’s, made 16 in one over from Hussey. Major Triffey has sufficiently recovered from the injuries sustained in the recent South African campaign to renew association with the summer game. It will remembered this gallant soldier was invalided home after being severely wounded.

Source: Sporting Life – Thursday 19 May 1904 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

Bridge Road

Road that was off east, or right-hand, side of Christchurch Road, opposite Runnymede. It was closed in 1966.

In this 1952 OS map, the road is shown with a single terrace of eleven houses on the north side, numbered sequentially 1 to 11.

1952 OS map

1952 OS map

Aerial photo from 1947 shows the row of houses on the left side of the road.

29th April 1947 from Britain From Above

29th April 1947 from Britain From Above

Aerial photo from 1949 shows the road looking to the west. The dome atop the tower on the right was Frys Metals factory.

19th March 1949 from Britain From Above

19th March 1949 from Britain From Above

It is not mentioned in the 1891 street directory, but there are two houses listed in the 1896 street directory and all eleven in the 1904 street directory:

1896

1, James CAVENDER, stationer
2, John STOPHER, greengrocer

1904

1, James CAVENDER, stationer
2, Arthur Thomas THORNS, greengrocer
3, Auburn Frederick ISACKE
4, Austin C HOLLANDS
5, William SHARPE
6, Arthur Albert FRISBY
7, Charles TAYLOR
8, Arthur SWINDELL
9, Robert SWINDELL
10, Edwin YOUNG
11, William YOUNG

The road was closed in 1966:

Bridge Road is to be closed down

Bridge Road, a cul-de-sac off Christchurch Road, Mitcham is to be closed. Merton Council have given planning permission to Frys Metal Foundries Ltd., for redevelopment which involves the closing of the road.

The road was originally the principle means of access to residential properties which have since been demolished. It now serves the factory premises only.

RIGHTS OF ACCESS

The council agreed to give permission provided the council’s right of adequate access to the public sewers were preserved.

Also provided that the owner of the factory should take over the responsibility for the street lamps and cables in the road, and also bear any costs incurred in closing the road.

Frys have also offered land near Bridge Road to the council free of charge for the proposed widening of Christchurch Road. The offer has been accepted.

Source: Mitcham News & Mercury, 13th May, 1966, page 1.

Occupants in 1939

1, Leonard Douglas and Elizabeth HAYNES
2, Mary Jane and Rosa FISK
3, William Charles and Alice Louisa and Christopher ADAMS
4, James and Maude BURLING
5, Robert and Gertrude MARSHALL
6, Alfred and Mabel Frances FORD
7, Robert and Doris May TAYLOR; Edith Mahala FRISWELL
8, James Alfred and Sarah Ellen DURLING
9, Henry William and Rose Florence and Florance DALTON
10, Ernest John and Flora BURLING
11, Charles Walter and Susan FRANCIS


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.