Tag Archives: Commonside East

Cedars Avenue

Road that runs south westerly from Tamworth Lane to Commonside East where it crosses Mitcham Common to Croydon Road near the junction with Carshalton Road. The part of the road across the Common was a footpath until it was widened in 1930/31.

From the minutes of the Mitcham Urban District council
Volume XVI May 1930 to April 1931
Highways Committee
4th June 1930
Page 115

IMPROVEMENTS.

I lay before you plans for the construction of a new road from Watneys Road to Galpins Road at an estimated cost of £3,880.

I also lay before you plans for the widening and reoonstruction of New Road from the common from Blue House Bridge to Cedars Road, at an intimated cost of £5,391.

In both cases it is proposed to maintain a footway on one side only, and in the case of the first mentioned road the width of the carriageway is 18 ft., and in the latter instance 24 ft. with 5 ft. footpath.

Yours obediently,
Riley Schofield, Assoc.M.Inst.C.E.,
Engineer and Surveyor.

Resolved –

(f) Improvements, Mitcham Common – That the Committee defer consideration of the plans for construction of a new road from Watneys Road to Galpins Road and for the widening and reconstruction of New Road across the Common from Blue Houses Bridge to Cedars Road, pending the decision of the Conservators with regard to the promotion of a Bill in Parliament.

This OS map from 1910 shows the route of road and footpath to the Blue House pub:

1910 OS map

It also shows two large houses off the east side of the road, and opposite the drive that led to Brenley. The names of these can be seen on this 1953 OS map, as The Chantry and Radstock.

1953 OS map

In the 1964 electoral register, the houses in Cedars Avenue were listed as:

No. 1,3 and 5
Brenley
Newholme
Orchard Cottage
Malvern
Devonia
Havrincourt
The Cedars
Radstock
The Chantry
The Orchard
Malgarry
Clonmel

Rear garden of The Orchard. Photo kindly supplied by a former resident.

Cedars Avenue looking towards Commonside East. Havrincourt is on the left. Photo kindly supplied by a former resident of The Orchard.

The houses on the east side of the road were renumbered even, starting from the Commonside East end, possibly in the 1930s. The 1939 for sale ad below for Devonia was the same as an ad listed for no. 2.

Road being surfaced in the 1960s. See comment below by Alan Hutchings.

News articles and adverts

Norwood News – Friday 14 April 1939

MITCHAM COMMON (partially overlooking).

Bright semi-detached freehold; vacant possession; 2 receptions, 3 bedrooms, kitchen, separate w.c., nice garden; £745. – Apply on premises, “Devonia”, Cedars-avenue, Mitcham; Mitcham 4130.

Norwood News – Saturday 13 November 1926
Image © Reach PLC. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

Text of ad:

MITCHAM
(Immediately facing Common and Golf Links).
(By tram alight at Blue House).
Substantially Built Brick and Tile
FREEHOLD HOUSES.
3 and 4 bedrooms. Every modern convenience.
Room for Garage.
£975 to £1,200.
LIBERAL MORTGAGE ARRANGED.
Apply, any time, any day, to:-
PYLE, Contractor,
Corner of Cedars Avenue and Commonside East,
MITCHAM, Surrey.


Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

1973 : Park Place Saved – Brenley Doomed

From Mitcham News & Mercury, 14th December 1973, page 1.

Park Place Saved – Brenley Doomed

Storm over the ‘Stately homes’

TWO of Mitcham’s “stately homes” have become the centre of the preservation storm. One has just been temporarily reprieved but the other is doomed for demolition.

Saved – for a while at least – is Park Place, once a highly desirable mansion set in parkland off Commonside-west. The council are reconsidering their earlier decision that it is not worth preserving.

Doomed is Brenley, a Victorian villa, off Commonside-east, at present used as a children’s home.

The Social Services Committee are to bulldoze ahead with their plans to pull it down, despite strong Tory claims led by councillor Mrs Iris Derriman, that this is expensive and needless destruction.

Councillor Peter Casey led the so far successful battle to save Park Place.

“I know the building is not of considerable architectural merit but it is on the supplementary list of these buildings and is in a conservation area.”

Although the majority of objections to its preservation had been on the grounds of costs and that it was not worth saving, he felt it had a certain character and could possibly serve the borough as offices.

“I know that the Greater London Council feel that it should be preserved,” he said.

Councillor Alan Jones angrily pointed out that if the GLC felt that strongly about the building then “they should dig their hands in their pockets and pay for it.”

WASTE

“It was strongly felt by the committee concerned that on all grounds it was not worthy of retention. There is no useful purpose in retaining it. It will be a sheer waste of time.”

The Education Committee who are currently using Park Place as a storage centre for equipment, agreed to reconsider their decision.

But Brenley, a smaller house had its death sentence confirmed by Social Service Chairman Miss Sheila Knight, who swept aside Tory pleas that so much money had been spent on its interior, including central heating that, as Councillor Mrs Derriman claimed, “you are pulling down a perfectly good building.”

“I agree we have spent a lot of money on Brenley but this is the trouble – we could go on spending money in attempts to get it up to the standard it should be for modern child care thinking.

“I think it is time to take a more realistic look at the situation – the present house parents who have given long and devoted service are nearing a well earned retirement and then we are going to have difficulty in attracting the kind of young married couple we need to run this children’s home.”

For despite the council’s efforts to modernize the interior it was still not up to a standard which would give the couple privacy when they were off duty.

A modern building would answer the needs both of the children in care and the family needs of those who looked after them.

Councillor Mrs Iris derriman remembered the recent demolition of The Croft, another old Mitcham villa used by the council as a nurses’ home until it was pulled down earlier this year.

“Now we are talking about removing another perfectly good building. What on earth are we doing? Brenley is a very pleasant building,” she said.