Tag Archives: 1915

Corporal William Henry Harding, D.C.M.

William Henry Harding was born on 5th November 1892 and was baptised on the 1st January 1893, at the Mitcham parish church in Church Road. His parents were William Henry and Phoebe Harding, living in Fountain Road.

The 1901 census shows their address as 43 Fountain Road, and the occupants were:

William H Harding, Head, aged 33, born 1868, flower seller
Pheoby Harding, Wife, aged 27, born 1874, flower seller
William H Harding, Son, aged 8, born 1893
Leonard Harding, Son, aged 9, born 1892

He joined the Army on 22nd October 1908, becoming a private in the 1st East Surreys, 3rd Battalion (Special Reserve). His service number was L/9806. He had said he was 18 years old, but was nearer 16. The Surrey Recruitment Registers show that physically he was 5 ft 3 and three-quarter inches tall, weighed 9 stone, and had grey eyes and brown hair.

He was stationed in Dublin, Ireland, when WW1 started.

Corporal W.H. Harding was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his outstanding bravery. He went into noman’s land and rescued his officer, 2nd Lt. Wilfrid Allen Davis. Cpl W.H. Harding was wounded but although he got him back, Lt. Davis subsequently died.

The entry in the London Gazette reads:

For conspicuous gallantry on “Hill 60,” when he beat off the enemy’s assault by throwing hand grenades, freely exposing himself though the trench was being heavily bombed.

Lt-Gen Sir John Roberts presented the medals.

Cpl W.H. Harding was also awarded the British War Medal, 1914 Star and Victory Medal.

He was discharged 22nd August 1917.

He died in 1954, aged 61.

Sources

Ancestry.com. Surrey, England, Church of England Baptisms, 1813-1912
Ancestry.com. British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920
Surrey Recruitment Registers 1908-1933
London Gazette, Publication date: 29 June 1915 Supplement:29212 Page:6379

Commonside West

Road from Upper Green East towards the junction with Madeira Road. Buildings are on one side only, as the other side is Three Kings Piece, which is a part of Mitcham Common. An exception being the sports changing rooms opposite Madeira Road.

Houses are numbered sequentially, from 1 (Newton House) to 72, which is part of the News of the World Houses. Between the Cold Blows footpath and the entrance to Park Places is currently only the Windmill pub and Merton Sea Cadets, but there were houses near the pub. Numbers 51 and 52 were demolished in 1967.

c.1900 : Newton House on the right in this clip from Merton Memories photo reference Mit_​2_​10-9 copyright London Borough of Merton

Occupants from Street Directories
Listed below in order from the Upper Green towards Madeira Road. The beer retailer referred to in these listings is for the Windmill pub.

1896
This directory lists the road as Mitcham Common (west side), and Cold Blows is shown as St Mary’s Avenue, which was a temporary renaming of that footpath.

John RICHENS (Newton House)
William WILLIAMSON (Holly Cottage)
Mrs SAHLER (Maori Cottage)
Christopher ROBINSON (The Lawn)
William BARNES, engineer
Mrs Lilian IRLAND, music teacher
Mrs DREWETT senior
Thomas GARDNER, furniture dealer

…. here is St Mary’s Avenue

Thomas Bodle LAWRENCE (Avenue Cottage)
James BROOKSON
James SAYERS, beer retailer
Charles GOULD
George SAWYER
John THOMPSON, diaryman
William F.J. SIMPSON (Park Place)

1904

John RICHENS (Newton House)
William Rutherford McLEOD (Holly Cottage)
William James DICKISSON (Trent Cottage)
Charles LESTER (The Lawn)
William BARNES, engineer
Thomas LAWSON, shopkeeper
Alfred GARDNER, furniture dealer

PILLAR LETTER BOX

…. here is Cold Blows

Thomas LAWRENCE
Miss SHEPHERD
Alexander Tully GRANT, beer retailer
John THOMPSON, diaryman
William F.J. SIMPSON (Park Place)

1911

Mrs RICHENS (Newton House)
William Rutherford McLEOD (Holly Cottage)
William James DICKISSON (Trent Cottage)
Charles LESTER (The Lawn)
William Howard BARNES, confectioner
William BARNES, engineer
Thomas LAWSON, shopkeeper
Alfred GARDNER, furniture dealer

LAMP POST LETTER BOX

…. here is Cold Blows

Thomas LAWRENCE, decorator
Miss SHEPHERD
Henry Edward CLISBY, beer retailer
John THOMPSON, diaryman
William F.J. SIMPSON (Park Place)

1915

Mrs RICHENS (Newton House)
William Rutherford McLEOD (Holly Cottage)
Ernest Frederick GOERING (The Nook)
Charles LESTER (The Lawn)
Mrs TURNER (Meriden)
Frank JAMES (Allesley)
William Howard BARNES, confectioner
William BARNES, engineer
George Frederick LOCKYER
Alfred E. GARDNER, furniture dealer

LAMP POST LETTER BOX

…. here is Cold Blows

Thomas LAWRENCE, decorator
James JORDAN
James BOXALL, beer retailer
John THOMPSON, diaryman
William F.J. SIMPSON (Park Place)

1925
Note that Cold Blows is not named as such, but is shown as ‘footpath to Lower Green’ i.e. the cricket green

Thomas George BAKER, builder (Newton House)
William Rutherford McLEOD (Holly Cottage)
Charles LESTER (The Lawn)
Alfred DREWITT (Fernhurst)
Mrs TURNER (Meriden)
Henry Willam ORFORD (Allesley)
William H. BARNES (Malvern)
William BARNES
George Frederick LOCKYER (The Cottage)
Alfred Ernest GARDNER, furniture dealer (Homeside)

.. footpath to Lower green ..

George Oliver NASH (North Lodge)
Lawrence Thomas BODLE, builder (Avenue Cottage)
James JORDAN
Alfred KILLICK
Harry LOCK
George WEST
Benjamin HILLS
Thomas HIGGS, confectioner
James BOXALL, beer retailer
Charles Thomas SEARS
George SAWYER
Mrs ODELL
John THOMPSON, dairy
William Charles HINES
News of the World Sports Ground (Leonard WHITE, hon. sec.) (Park Place)

In the 1938 commercial directory, T.G. BAKER is listed as builder at no. 1 Commonside West, telephone number 2915.

1936 clip from Tom Francis photo of Albert Ernest Gardner’s furniture stores, from Merton Memories phot reference Mit_​2_​10-11 copyright London Borough of Merton.

In the 1912 directory, Alfd. E. Gardner, Common side west, is listed as a manager of the Zion Congregational School.

The Swan Garage

Motor dealer and garage near the Swan pub on the western side of London Road, south of Eveline Road.

Business owned by Bertie Cyril DENDY.

He was married on 3rd August 1910 to Lilian Beatrice Mary MANSFIELD, aged 25, of 7 Spencer Road, Cottenham Park, Wimbledon. Her father is shown on the marriage certificate as Thomas Mansfield, carpenter. Bertie Dendy, also at the same address has his occupation shown as Coach Builder, the same as his father Adolphus.

The 1911 census shows him as a wheelwright:
Address: The Oakwood, London Road, Mitcham, Surrey

Adolphus DENDY, head, born 1854, aged 57, wheelwright
Frances Sarah Dendy, wife, born 1852, aged 59, married 33 years
Bertie Dendy, son, born 1881, aged 30, wheelwright
Lilian Beatrice Mary Dendy, son’s wife, born 1891, aged 20

His father Adolphus is listed in the 1915 street directory as a wheelwright at The Oakwoods, north of Oakwood Terrace. Adolphus Dendy was a District Chairman in 1907, and also landlord of the Ship pub. In the 1918 Kelly directory, Adolphus Dendy is listed as carriage & motor dealer.

From the 1925 street directory, listed in London Road going south:

Eveline villas :
10, William Arthur VLEACH
9, Ernest Alfred ARTHUR
8, Hugh ANDERSON
7, William DRAKEFORD
6, Latham Charles LATHAM

…. here is Eveline road

5, Sidney BOREHAM
3, J. W. AUSTIN & Son, provision dealers
2, Ernest REEVE, butcher
1, Miss L. FROUDE, confectioner

B. DENDY motor engineer
The Mitcham Cabinet Works (E. W. CLIFTON & C. OLDHAM, proprietors)
Swan inn, Roy DALE
B. DENDY motor engineer
Mrs. DENDY (The Oakwoods)

From the London Gazette, 2nd February, 1937:

NOTICE is hereby given that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us, the undersigned
Bertie Cyril Dendy and Arthur Henry Stanforth carrying on businees as Garage Proprietors at 174
London Road, Mitcham in the county of Surrey under the style or firm of “THE SWAN GARAGE”
has been dissolved by mutual consent as from the thirteenth day of December 1936. All debts due and owing to or by the late firm win be respectively received and paid by the said Berne Cyril Dendy.

The said business will be carried on in the future by the said Bertie Cyril Dendy.

—As witness our hands this 25th day of January 1937.

ARTHUR HENRY STAINFORTH.

BERTIE CYRIL DENDY.

Norwood News 5th May 1937 via the British Newspaper Archive

Norwood News – Friday 15th October 1937

MITCHAM’S SOLE AGENTS B. C. Dendy and Co.. Ltd., 180, London-road, Mitcham, has an advantage over other motor-dealers in Mitcham as he is the only agent in Mitcham for Morris and Ford cars. This advantage is also an advantage for prospective buyers of cars residing within easy reach of Mitcham, as one is able to see the car one wants in comfort.

Ford, of course, is known to all, as since 1903 the Ford organisation has made and sold over 25,000,000 ears. This unique record in manufacturing has only been made possible by the unusual value which Ford cars offer. The Ford “Ten” is the latest addition to Ford high-value ears, and one of the most outstanding announced for many years. It marks a new stage in the evolution of enjoyable but inexpensive motoring, offering exceptional roominess, high engineering quality. assured reliability, with remarkable economy.

His other sole agency. that of Morris cars, gives prospective buyers the opportunity of examining cars which have a reputation for fast, safe, and comfortable riding. The Morris “24” is designed in such a way that the most careful attention has been paid to those three dominating points.

The new overhead valve power unit has been thoroughly proved over an eveonsive mileage and combines surging power with the absolute reliability and smooth running for which Morris engines have been famed in the past. With a top speed of 70 miles per hour and an mildly impressive performance on the lower gears, it is more than capable of holding its own even with cars of much higher horsepower. It Is the car for the man who desires comfortable motoring.

Listed in the 1938 commercial directory as B.C. Dendy & Co., motor car agents, 174 London Road.

Lactagol

E.T. Pearson Ltd., who was at 417-445 London Road, made Lactagol, a powdered extract of cotton seed and calcium, which they described as

a valuable preparation for increasing the supply of milk when taken by the expectant mother

Nottingham Evening Post – Tuesday 13 December 1949
Image © Trinity Mirror. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

The earliest ad for Lactagol on the British Newspaper Archive found so is from 1915:

Western Times – Thursday 21 October 1915
Image © Trinity Mirror. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

Science Museum Group. Carton of ‘Lactagol’, London, England, 1920-1955. A627904. Science Museum Group Collection Online. Accessed August 29, 2018.

The site acquired by Mitcham Borough Council in 1959.

Arthur Edmund Hayne

During World War 1, Arthur Hayne’s photographers shop in Tooting offered free portrait photos to recruits.

His obituary from the Mitcham and Colliers Wood Gazette 8th May 1959 :

Death of Mr. Arthur Hayne
Former Well-Known Tooting Personality

We regret to record the death of Mr. Arthur Hayne of Carshalton Park Road, Carshalton. A former Tootingite, Mr. Hayne who was 91 years of age was actively associated with politics all his life.

He was well known 50 years ago as an open air speaker at Tooting Broadway for the Anti-Socialist Union, and he also addressed meetings at Mitcham Fair Green.

The Three Brothers

Born at Croydon, Mr. Hayne came to Tooting at the age of eight with his brothers James and Charles, and was connected with them in business at Tooting Broadway in the early part of the century. Arthur had a photographers shop, and James was a well-known Tooting news agent while Charles sold the papers outside a kiosk near the Tooting Baths.

Mr. Arthur Hayne did not take an active part in the political life of Tooting. He went to school at the church schools in Church Lane and later at Tooting Graveney Schools and was a member of the Tooting Parish Church choir in his younger days.

He moved to Mitcham some years ago and become chairman of the Mitcham Conservative Association. A staunch Conservative Mr. Hayne was well-known as a public speaker for the Conservative cause to which he devoted much of his spare time up to a few years ago. During the First World War he was a special constable.

When he moved to Carshalton he joined the Carshalton and Banstead Conservative Association and become vice chairman. Until a few months ago Mr. Hayne who was in business in London as a merchant was still working. He leaves a wife (formerly Miss Attlee of Tooting), two sons and two daughters.

The funeral was at Carshalton Parish Church.

In 1914, A. E. Hayne is listed in company 1 of the Mitcham Town Guard.

In the 1915 street directory, he was living at St. Cross, Graham Road, where he was also listed as the secretary of the Mitcham Conservative & Unionist Association.

Bridge Road

Road that was off east, or right-hand, side of Christchurch Road, opposite Runnymede. It was closed in 1966.

In this 1952 OS map, the road is shown with a single terrace of eleven houses on the north side, numbered sequentially 1 to 11.

1952 OS map

1952 OS map

Aerial photo from 1947 shows the row of houses on the left side of the road.

29th April 1947 from Britain From Above

29th April 1947 from Britain From Above

Aerial photo from 1949 shows the road looking to the west. The dome atop the tower on the right was Frys Metals factory.

19th March 1949 from Britain From Above

19th March 1949 from Britain From Above

It is not mentioned in the 1891 street directory, but there are two houses listed in the 1896 street directory and all eleven in the 1904 street directory:

1896

1, James CAVENDER, stationer
2, John STOPHER, greengrocer

1904

1, James CAVENDER, stationer
2, Arthur Thomas THORNS, greengrocer
3, Auburn Frederick ISACKE
4, Austin C HOLLANDS
5, William SHARPE
6, Arthur Albert FRISBY
7, Charles TAYLOR
8, Arthur SWINDELL
9, Robert SWINDELL
10, Edwin YOUNG
11, William YOUNG

The road was closed in 1966:

Bridge Road is to be closed down

Bridge Road, a cul-de-sac off Christchurch Road, Mitcham is to be closed. Merton Council have given planning permission to Frys Metal Foundries Ltd., for redevelopment which involves the closing of the road.

The road was originally the principle means of access to residential properties which have since been demolished. It now serves the factory premises only.

RIGHTS OF ACCESS

The council agreed to give permission provided the council’s right of adequate access to the public sewers were preserved.

Also provided that the owner of the factory should take over the responsibility for the street lamps and cables in the road, and also bear any costs incurred in closing the road.

Frys have also offered land near Bridge Road to the council free of charge for the proposed widening of Christchurch Road. The offer has been accepted.

Source: Mitcham News & Mercury, 13th May, 1966, page 1.

Occupants in 1939

1, Leonard Douglas and Elizabeth HAYNES
2, Mary Jane and Rosa FISK
3, William Charles and Alice Louisa and Christopher ADAMS
4, James and Maude BURLING
5, Robert and Gertrude MARSHALL
6, Alfred and Mabel Frances FORD
7, Robert and Doris May TAYLOR; Edith Mahala FRISWELL
8, James Alfred and Sarah Ellen DURLING
9, Henry William and Rose Florence and Florance DALTON
10, Ernest John and Flora BURLING
11, Charles Walter and Susan FRANCIS


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Anti-German Riots after sinking of the Lusitania

Anti-German riots broke out on the evening of Wednesday 12th May, 1915, in Tooting and the next day in Mitcham, in response to the sinking of the ship Lusitania.

ANTI-GERMAN RIOTS

Bakers’ Windows Broken

Several Arrests

The scenes of violence which have marked the public feeling against enemy aliens which has been aroused as a result of the Lusitania crime broke out in the neighbourhood on Wednesday evening. At Tooting Broadway a crowd commenced to assemble about 8 o’clock, but for some time it reached very large dimensions. Towards nine o’clock the gathering became more dense, and it was obvious that the baker’s shop owned by Mr P. Jung was in danger of assault. The police, who were reinforced, did their utmost to keep the crowd on the move, and prevented any congregating immediately outside the shop. Meanwhile Mr Jung closed his business as a precautionary measure, but this move was only greeted with jeers. Shortly before ten o’clock a loud crash of glass told that at least one missile had found the mark, a success which was boisterously cheered. The police continued to force the crowd to the opposite side of the road, but the passing of the trams enabled the mob to make some advances, which, however, were fortunately checked.

Every now and again more glass was smashed, and eventually there was very little left of the huge plate-glass windows which have helped to make Mr Jung’s shop such an attractive place of business. When the police did actually see a person throwing he was promptly arrested. Some ugly rushes were the result, and it is a matter for congratulation that no very serious conflicts occurred between the police and the public.

While the guardians of the law were straining every endeavour to cope with the crowd at the Broadway, now numbering some 2,000, a few persons commenced paying attention to the Hygienic Bakery, owned by a German, and situated further down the High-street, opposite the “Mercury” Offices. The roller shutters were lowered, but some spirits more determined than the rest wrenched them away from their fastenings, and with considerable noise they fell to the ground. Without loss of time a brick was hurled at the window with an accuracy of aim somewhat remarkable for a member of the fair sex, who made the claim of having drawn first blood. Other bricks and stones followed in quick succession with more or less precision, and one windows had hardly a particle of glass left in.

THE “SPECIALS” ARRIVE

At about 11 o’clock a strong contingent of special constables appeared on the scene, and were accorded a very mixed reception. The Tooting section was strengthened by a force from Mitcham, numbering about 70, under Inspector G.J. Poston. They were divided into sections, and did most useful work in helping the regular police to disperse the crowds.

Other shops were attacked in Garratt-lane, and all suffered in a like manner and to a similar extent. Police remained on guard all night and the next day, and as soons as carpenters could be procured the premises were boarded up, and in some cases the German traders packed up their goods and chattels and cleared off with all possible despatch.

ANTI-GERMAN DEMONSTRATIONS AT MITCHAM

Early last evening a crowd, which gradually swelled until about 8 o’clock, when it numbered several hundred persons, assembled at the Fair Green for the purpose of expressing indignation at the recent murders on the high seas.

Proceeding in the direction of the Parade, the crowd halted in front of the jeweller’s shop tenanted by Mr J. B. Rompel, a naturalised German.

Their attitude was distinctly menacing, and but for the prescence of a large force of Special Constabulary they would, no doubt, have vented their feelings in no unmistakeable manner. After some jeering and hooting the police dispersed the crowd.

With the exception of one man, whose head was cut with a stone, no damage or injury took place.

Source: Mitcham and Tooting Mercury, Friday, 14th May, 1915, page 4.

A photo of special constable recruited during the First World War is on Merton Memories.