Category Archives: Sport

Hengelo Gardens

Hengelo Gardens plaque clip from Merton Memories photo reference Mit_Streets_D_LEW_35-1

This plaque was unveiled when the road was opened.

HENGELO
GARDENS

30th August 1952

This plaque was unveiled by the Burgomaster of Hengelo as a token of the friendship between the people of Mitcham and Hengelo in The Netherlands

The road was named after the town of Hengelo, in the Netherlands. In 1945 an Anglo-Netherlands Sports Scheme was started between Mitcham and Hengelo, see news article below.

2019 Open Street Map of Hengelo Gardens

In 1955, a square in Hengelo had been renamed Mitchamplein. It is now a car park.

It is not known when the plaque was removed.


News Articles about Hengelo and Mitcham

Norwood News – Friday 29 June 1945

Mitcham Adopts Hengelo

Anglo-Netherlands Sports Scheme

A representative body of Mitcham sportsmen held an inaugural meeting last week in the staff canteen of Messrs. Stewart and Gray, Paisley Works, Mitcham, in connection with the Anglo – Netherlands Sports Scheme. The Mayor of Mitcham (Ald. A H. Bailey), who presided, spoke of his great friendship for the Dutch people, and how pleased he felt with the idea of the Anglo-Netherlands Sports Scheme, and it gave him much pleasure to accept the presidency of the Mitcham section.

After an address by Mr. Yapp, who convened the meeting, it was unanimously agreed that Mitcham should adopt the scheme and link up with Hengelo, in Holland, Hengelo being on a par with Mitcham in size, population and industries. Everyone at the meeting felt that Mitcham was about to enter into an era of great sporting events, and that the happy associations made between the people and their brave Dutch Allies during the war would be continued and improved through the activities of this sports scheme.

The following officers and committee were unanimously elected: President, the Mayor of Mitcham ; chairman, Mr. A. R. Hillen; general hon. secretary, Mr. J. W. Yapp ; treasurer, Mr. J. Beverige ; Finance Committee, the chairman. general hon. secretary and treasurer, with Messrs. J. Forsyth and J. Simper ; General Purposes Committee, Messrs. S. Mackinnon, R. Murphy, W. Wilder, P. W. Collard, Thos. Sibley. A. Lacey, E. Willard. C. Smith, Thos. Bicknell, E. Chambers, C. Runcieman, W. Wilson, Flying Officer Judd, and the hon. secretary. The committee agreed to co-opt other local sportsmen. Anyone interested should write to the general secretary, Mr. J. W. Yapp, 60 Streatham-road, Mitcham, Surrey. Sportswomen are particularly invited.

West Sussex Gazette – Thursday 23 August 1945

The link-up of Mitcham with Hengelo, Holland, for sport and social purposes has been completed by the Netherlanders’ hearty acceptance and reciprocation of the scheme. For the present, transport is the difficulty, but it is hoped to send two Mitcham football teams over before the end of the year. At Hengelo there are plenty of football-minded enthusiasts, and two teams awaiting International contests between the goal-posts The local papers there are co-operating in forewarding this happy way of fraternisation

West Sussex Gazette – Thursday 30 September 1948

VISITORS FROM HOLLAND

Glorious week-end weather greatly enhanced the cheerfulness of the Mayor of Mitcham’s informal welcome to the Burgomaster of Hengelo, Holland, and his party of 60 sports players to spend a week in Mitcham.

It is the return visit of the Mitcham pilgrimage to Hengelo in 1946. On Saturday morning the sights of London were toured. including the Houses of Parliament. In the afternoon the visitors saw the first of Mitcham’s football and the last cricket match of the season on the elm-bordered Green now tinged wIth russet tints of autumn. The evening was filled with a gala at Mitcham Baths attended by several ex-Olympic competitors. Sunday brought another London tour and korfball.

The formal civic welcome to the guests (put up in Mitcham homes) was at the Town Hall on Monday evening. Thereafter a full programme till the young Netherlanders return next Saturday.

West Sussex Gazette – Thursday 09 December 1948

As others see us. A journalist who came to Mitcham with the friendship pilgrims from Hengelo, Holland, afterwards wrote in his home paper that Mitcham was “a simple factory town without many attractions”! The other Dutch reporter visitor discovered that our ” pubs ” close early, and that cafes, known in the Netherlands, do not exist here. Moreover, at our public-houses, “strangely enough,” he wrote, you have to stand, and the beer is bad; and, what is more, very expensive”!

J.H. Peters, Optician

c. 1962 clip from Merton Memories photo reference Mit_Streets_P_Will_77-2

Addresses taken from phone books:

1959 : 4A Western Road, MIT 7114
1966 : 4 Western Road, 01-648 7114
1981 : 6 Fair Green Parade, 01-648 7114.

J.H. Peters was James Henry Peters, the marathon runner known as Jim Peters.

From the Liverpool Echo – Wednesday 13 January 1999

Marathon hero Peters dies

MARATHON legend Jim Peters, who caught the imagination of the public at the 1954 Empire Games in Canada when he staggered around the last lap, has died aged 80.

Peters entered the Vancouver stadium around three miles ahead of the next competitor but dehydration had taken its toll and as the crowd rose to acclaim him he faltered and began to stagger.

He fell six times and his anguished English team-mates at trackside could not help for fear that he would be disqualified if he received any assistance.

They were finally able to go to his aid when it was clear he was not going to cross the finishing line of the race eventually won by Scotland’s Joe McGhee.

But his courageous efforts over the final few yards made an unforgettable sight which was etched in the minds of millions by Movietone News.

He ran a world’s best time in the marathon each year from 1952 to 1954 but he was more celebrated in that glorious defeat than in his victories during the fifties.

Peters quit athletics after the Games – “It cost me my killer instinct” he said – but the image of his heroic bid for a gold medal 45 years ago still lives on.

David Bedford, the international race director of the London Marathon, said: “Jim was a class runner when marathon running, unlike today, was unfahsionable.

Plimsoles

“He trained harder than most – often 100 miles a week – and believed in the work ethic with his thousands of miles run in plimsoles.

“My first memories of him were from newspaper pictures showing him collapsing when in sight of the finish.”

Bedford, the former 10,000 metres world record holder, added: “Few athletes push themselves to such exhaustion as Jim did at those Games. He was unique.”

Edenvale Road

Road that runs northward from Gorringe Park Avenue, crossing St Barnabas Road to Ashbourne Road. Its shape seems to follow the path that separated Gorringe Park House from the farm on its east side, as shown on this OS map of 1911.

1911 OS map

The 1925 street directory names the road as Eden Vale and lists the properties from number 79 Ashbourne Road:

East side.

North Mitcham Improvement Association Sports Ground
William TYRELL, poultry farm

West side.

1 through 17

… here is Milton rd

19 through 33

This directory only lists odd-numbered houses on the west side of the road. The electoral register for Autumn 1925 also lists only the odd numbers, and the occupants were:

1, Frederick Walter and Ethel CATTERMOLE
3, David MUSTARD; Thomas TAYLOR
5, Joseph William GOBBY; Kezia Maude ADAMS
7, Marguerite BROWITT
9, Harold and Mary Elizabeth ODAM; Mary Elizabeth WOOD
11, David and Annie McGREGOR
13, John Joseph HANDCOCK; William John BATTLE
15, Frederick LIFE; Charles BECKETT
17, George Frederick GOODBODY; Ernest WALLER
19, Thomas Robert and Ethel Elizabeth BLACKMORE; Francis LAMBLE
21, Frederick William HALLET; Bertram Charles AGATE
23, Cecil Armfield WAKELING
25, Elizabeth WISEMAN; Sydney William EADE
27, Walter William and Emily STALLWOOD
29, James Thomas and Hilda JACKSON
31, Minnie TURNER

North Surrey Poultry Farm, Albert and Louise TYRELL

The Autumn 1926 electoral adds some even-numbered houses:

2, Alonzo James & Margaret Mary SHARP
4, William and Jemima and Harold Percy BULL
6, Nellie Hannah GREENSTREET
8, Arthur and Gertrude HULKS
10, Albert George and Lucy Matilda CONSTABLE

North Surrey Poultry Farm, Albert and Louise TYRELL

In the 1929 electoral register appears more even-numbered houses, from 12 to 28:

2, Victor and Florence ANGLE
12, Bernard Eden and Dorothy Charlotte CANDY
14, Frank and Mabel Winifred CHEESMAN
16, George Boswell and Getrude Maud CHAMPNISS; John William McFarlane and Margaret Josephine KIDD
18, Ernest Leslie and Emily Beatrice ANSTY Joseph John and Elsie Mabel IVE
20, Hedley Frank and Margaret Gertrude JACKSON
22, Thomas Joseph and Annie Esther SAGE
24, Frederick William and Rebecca Esther EAGLESTONE
26, Benjamin Frederick James and Norah Winifred BALDWIN; Percy Edward and Kathleen DODSWELL
28, Ivan Albert and May and Ellen WEALE

North Surrey Poultry Farm, Albert and Louise TYRELL

1932 is the last year that the poultry farm is listed in the electoral registers. In 1934 there are more even-numbered houses from 30 to 36.

This 1950 OS map shows ‘Tennis Courts’ on the east side of Edenvale Road. These were on the North Mitcham Improvement Association sports ground referred to in the 1925 street directory.

1950 OS map


Embed from Getty Images

High jump athlete Dorothy Tyler-Odam MBE moved to Edenvale Road as a young girl with her parents. From the 1925 electoral register, she lived at number 9. She died in 2014, aged 94.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Bordergate Dairy

Dairy that was in Wilson Avenue.

Referred to in this 5th January 1962 article from the Mitcham News & Mercury on the death of local dairyman.

RETIRED dairyman Mr. Arthur Court (aged 69), Victoria Road, Mitcham, who died suddenly last week, was a well-known local personality.

He went into the dairy business after leaving school at Killick’s Lane — now St. Mark’s Road — and could remember driving cows to graze on Figges Marsh when he was only 10. He celebrated his golden wedding with his 70-year-old wife in February.

During the First World War he served in the Royal Flying Corps as a cook. After, he took over Bordergate Dairy at Wilson Avenue, Mitcham.

Among his eight grandchildren were Tommy Court, a Kingstonian footballer, David Court, who is with Arsenal, and Elizabeth West of Mitcham Athletic Club.

Probate record on Ancestry shows his death was on 27th December 1961, and he lived at 141 Victoria Road. He left £2,702 7s. to his widow.

1959 : Monte Car hits a boulder but finishes run

From the Mitcham News and Mercury
30th January 1959

Damaged steering failed to prevent three men from completing the dangerous mountain circuit of the Monte Carlo rally.

Mr Colin Sproxton, 39-year-old owner of Home Radio, London Road, Mitcham, said on Monday : “We are very pleased with the result. We finished the course 66th in the general classification and 19th in our own class. We did better than several champions.”

Mr Sproxton – it was the third time he had entered the rally – was co-driver of a Ford Zephyr belonging to Streatham garage owner Mr Gordon

Danger spot for the enthusiasts was in the mountains. They hit a boulder which had fallen into the road.

“The road was too narrow to avoid it and too icy for us to stop. We were very lucky – it could have had us out of the rally.”

SPINS

“As it was, it damaged the steering rod and steering was very difficult, but not impossible. We later had it straightened, but steering was not perfect.”

The Zephyr came through the course almost unscratched.

“Apart from lamps which were smashed by falling stones we had little trouble. We spun round once or twice, but somehow always ended up pointing in the right direction.

Conditions were pretty good, although we did experience a bit of everything including fog and ice,” said Mr Sproxton.

He returned home on Sunday. On Monday he was back behind the counter of his shop.

For photo, see Merton Memories.

1954 : Stephen Chart becomes Mitcham Cricket Club President

Norwood News – Friday 26 February 1954

Col. Chart is president of Mitcham C C

LIEUT.-COL STEPHEN CHART, a member of Mitcham Cricket Club for 50 years, was elected club president at the annual meeting. He succeeds Mr. H. L. Gauntlett, who died last year.

Describing the cricket club as the “most important institution in Mitcham.” Col. Chart said that he had an advantage over several of his predecessors “in that I have on one or two occasions played for the club.”

During the rest of the election of officers it was mainly a case of the old bands carrying on. Reelected were E. J. Dobinson (chairman). J. H. Stainforth (secretary), S. J. Pillinger (treasurer) — for the 27th year — and B. Bullock (match secretary).

Team captains are E. J. Ide (1st XI), G. Brodie (2nd XI), T. W. instance (3rd XI) and S. L. Smith (Wednesday XI). F. Cole is team secretary.

Surprise of the elections was the appointment of the opening bowler, R. S. Culmer, as vice-captain to the first team. At the previous annual meeting Culmer had said he would not be playing regular cricket. He forecast a gradual retirement from the game, Presumably he will now appear more frequently.

Collections on the Green during the season amounted to £218 with a further £178 from the loan of deck chairs. But the rising costs of the game are still hitting the club and a campaign to recruit honorary members is being launched. Each member of the club will try to enrol two.

The Harwood Trust bat – awarded to the most improved player under 25 – went to 18-year-old Colin Morgan, the opening batsman who had an average of 62 during cricket week.

Tom Sherman, the fastest bowler of his time

Cricketer who made 82 appearances in first class matches in the 19th century.

Born in Mitcham on 1st December 1825, his father James Sherman was also a cricketer. He died 10th October 1911.

A letter dated 30th November was published in the The Sportsman of Thursday 1st December 1904:

TOM SHEARMAN.

Sir.,

I thought it would be of interest for you and others interested in cricket to know that Mr Tom Sherman attains his seventy-ninth birthday to-morrow. He is the oldest Surrey cricketer, and has the unique distinction of having played continuously for fifty years. His health haring quite failed him, and circumstances for this reason being anything but comfortable, I would be glad if something might be done to make his position a little more comfortable during the winter months. I feel quite sure that some of the older generation who knew him in his famous bowling days would willingly help him if they knew his position.

— Yours, etc.,
Arthur B. Wilkinson.
Studio,
Carlton-gardens,
Lower Green,
Mitcham, November 30.

Source: The British Newspaper Archive

His obituary was reported in the Croydon Guardian and Surrey County Gazette of Saturday 14th October 1911.

TOM SHERMAN DIES AT CROYDON.

A Famous Surrey Cricketer.

The Inquest.

The death of Tom Sherman, of Mitcham, who succumbed at Croydon Hospital, Tuesday, after breaking his leg at Mitcham, leaves William Caffyn the only survivor of a great band of professional cricketers who were in their prime nearly sixty years ago.

In “Scores and Biographies,” Sherman, who was born 1827, is described the as the fastest bowler of his time, and himself recalled the fact that in one of Surrey matches against Yorkshire at Sheffield he broke stump into five pieces. For this feat an admirer gave him a case of razors.

For the greater part of his long life, says “Unknown” in the “Morning Leader,” he lived at Mitcham, one of the famous nurseries of the game, and it was on the village common nine years ago that I last saw Sherman, on the occasion of his annual benefit. It may the vanity of old age to compare the present with the past to the disadvantage of the former, but I remember the wrinkled veteran as very emphatic in expressing an opinion that the bowling in his time was a great deal faster than that of modern days. In the matter of physical power, he believed that Alfred Mynn and himself were considerably ahead of latter-day bowlers when it came to question of pace. “This right knee,” he said, ” was put out as result of a scorching ball from Mynn. and it has never been right since.”

Sherman played for Surrey during eleven or twelve seasons with Julius Caesar, Caffyn, Lockyer, Martingell, and Mortlock. Sherman never bowled against Dr. W. G. Grace, but the man for whom he had the greatest respect as a bat was Fuller Pilch. Sherman dropped out of county cricket when his county were at their best, taking scarcely any part in the great things achieved by the Surrey team under Mr. F. P. Miller, who led the side to victory against All England in 1861. Appearing at Lords in 1846, Sherman met with most success in season the of 1850 and 1851, taking 99 wickets in the course of ten matches during two years. This was before bowling analyses were taken. Described as one of the fastest round-arm bowlers, he earned fame as a contemporary of Alfred Mynn, Fuller Pilch, George Parr, William Caffyn, Felix, and Martingeil. Two months older than Caffyn, Sherman was the oldest professional cricketer living.