Tag Archives: 1937

Albert Thomas Till, Medical Officer for Health at Mitcham

16th July 1936. Dr Till, with the Mayoress, Mrs Davies, at a ‘Welfare Centres ‘ garden party at Park Place. Clip from Merton Memories photo, reference Mit_​Hospitals_​4-1

In the 1935 Medical Directory he is listed as living at 43, Mitcham Park.

In 1924 he obtained his degree as Batchelor of Medicine / Batchelor of Surgery and a Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene; and post-graduated with Dental Public Health in 1931 at the University of London. He was a Fellow of the Royal Institute of Public Health, and the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

He was the Medical Officer at the Mission Hospital in Mahamba, Swaziland; and the Resident Medical Officer at the Victoria Hospital in Damascus, Syria.

He authored Dental caries in native children, published in the South African Medical Journal in 1927; Some observations on influenza in 1933 and Liquid paraffin, a cause of loss of weight in children, in 1934, both in the Journal of State Medicine.

He was appointed Mitcham Medical Officer for Health in 1937.

Injured during bombing raid on 12th November, 1940, at 31 Mitcham Park, he died the same day at Wilson Hospital. He was 40 years old.

From Norwood News – Friday 15 November 1940, page 2:

Obituary
TRAGIC DEATH OF DR. TILL
Medical Officer of Health at Mitcham

THE tragic death of Dr. A. T. Till, Medical Officer of Health for Mitcham, has cut short a promising career at the comparatively early age of 40 years.

He was a native of South Africa, and came to Mitcham 3 1/2 years ago, when he was temporarily appointed for six months’ trial to succeed the late Dr. Fegen, who then was a part-time officer of health. By the end of his term, Dr. Till had given such complete satisfaction, that be was unanimously given the full-time post of medical officer. That he justified that confidence is recognised everywhere. Year by year he endeared himself more and more to the Council, his colleagues, and the ratepayers generally, and he came to be regarded as one of the most popular of Mitcham’s public servants. Unostentatious at all times, Dr. Till wielded a great influence throughout the borough, and improved the health services to a remarkable extent.

A prominent Council official paid him this tribute: “Dr. Till was a first-class officer,” he said. “Exceedingly capable, and most popular with the whole of the public services. Ever ready to give advice, it could be absolutely relied unon. The Council has lost one of its best and most conscientious officers.”

A sad coincidence is that normally he would have been on duty elsewhere on the night of his death, but he had arranged an exchange with a professional colleague. During the war period, Dr. Till had been in charge of the ambulance and first aid posts. In addition to his ordinary duties, and he worked unceasingly for the benefit of the public services.

The Mayor (Ald. E.J.D. Field) is calling a special meeting of the Council for to-morrow (Saturday) to pay tribute to Dr. Till’s memory, and to place on record an appreciation of his services.

Dr. Till leaves a widow and daughter to mourn their irreparable loss.

Commonwealth war Grave Commission casualty record.

In his will, he left £909 3s. 7d. to his widow Emily Annie Till (around £50,000 in 2019 values).

Sources:
Wellcome Trust; London, England; Collection: The Medical Directory, 1935; Reference: b21330724_i13766260

Sir Isaac Wilson : Death of a Benefactor of Mitcham

From The Mitcham News & Mercury, 29th September, 1944, page 4:

SIR ISAAC H. WILSON
Death of Benefactor of Mitcham

REGARDED WEALTH AS AN
OBLIGATION

Mitcham mourns the death at the age of 82 of Sir Isaac H Wilson, The Birches, The Cricket Green, a well-loved personality whose generosity has brought lasting benefits to the people of Mitcham.

Sir Isaac died on Tuesday in the Wilson Hospital, his £120,000 gift to the borough, which with Cumberland house and Mitcham Garden Village remain lasting testimonies to the spirit of a man to whom wealth was regarded as an obligation to the less fortunate rather than a privilege to himself.

In fifteen years his benefactions to the borough have been in the neighborhood of a quarter of a million pounds, but his greatness of heart was something not to be measured in terms of money. He was not a rich man who gave of his wealth has a salve to conscience. Certainly he felt it a duty to spend his money well, and the only return he asked was the increased happiness of the people. Although he has done more for Mitcham than any other man, he was loved for his own sake rather than for his gifts. He was simple kind and modest; he hated publicity, and did not care for constant reminders about the good he had done his adopted town.

QUIET DAILY VISITS

He liked a quiet life, and latterly since ill health had restricted his activities his greatest pleasure was to visit the Wilson Hospital and Cumberland House, a thing he did almost daily when his health permitted. He was the most welcome of all visitors at both places. There was no member of the staff who was not pleased to see the familiar figure coming up the drive, for if his step was slower of recent years, he had always a smile for his friends, and a happy twinkle in his eye.

Much has been written of Sir Isaac’s romantic rise from his obscure native village of Milton, Cumberland to a position of wealth and influence in the world. He was the youngest and only surviving member of a family of four brothers, sons of a yeoman farmer, who went out into the world to seek their fortunes in the building trade, and then spent the fruits of their labours on charity. They spent their youth working on their father’s farm, and later Sir Isaac became a draper’s apprentice.

BUILDING DEVELOPEMENT

He left the drapery business to join his brother, Joseph, in London where the two brothers developed large areas of Fulham, Mitcham and Tooting Junction. The other two brothers, Thomas and John, made fortunes building working class houses in Newcastle, and when they died Sir Isaac inherited several hundred thousand pounds.

The Wilson Hospital, the foundation stone of which was laid by his first wife, who was also a native of Cumberland, was Sir Isaac’s first benefaction to the borough. In November, 1928, it was opened by the Princess Royal. Later Sir Isaac enlarged the hospital adding two wings and installing up-to-date equipment.

THE GARDEN VILLAGE

On part of Cranmer green he built Mitcham Garden Village, the replica of his native Village, where the borough’s old inhabitants may live rent free. His next to gift to Mitcham was Cumberland House, the modern convalescent home at the rear of his own home which cost £60,000. This has been taken over by Surrey County Council. The cost of upholding the home by voluntary methods would have been an enormous charge on Mitcham, and Sir Isaac agreed that the best scheme was for the County Council to accept responsibility. Sir Isaac assured the future of the Wilson hospital by conveying to the trustees property in the district to the value of £45,000 as an endowment for the hospital. He also gave a home for the nurses.

Mitcham was not the only recipient of his generosity. His native village of Milton and neighbouring districts benefited by more than £20,000 from his generosity. This was spent on building cottages for the poor.

The death of his only daughter a considerable time ago was a great grief to Sir Isaac. Later he lost his wife, who, he said, had been the inspiration of the gift of the hospital. His only granddaughter, Mrs Black, lives on the Cricket Green, a few doors from Sir Isaac’s own home. Hs two grandsons are serving with the Forces.

CHURCHMAN AND CONSERVATIVE

For many years he played a prominent part in the town’s life. Earlier in his life he took an active interest in St. Barnabas Church where he was a churchwarden for some time. He was a staunch Conservative and for a time was president of the local Conservative and Constitutional Club. He was a keen educationalist as well as a Justice of the Peace until recently. For some time he was Chairman of the Mitcham Bench.

Formerly a member of Surrey County Council he was also a member of Mitcham Council until last year, when failing health caused him to relinquish many public posts.

In 1937 he became a Freeman of Mitcham, and in June, 1939, was knighted for political and public service in Mitcham.

Sir Isaac accepted honours gracefully, and continued his work in the same efficient and unassuming way.

A GREAT READER

For years Sir Isaac has been Mitcham’s best friend. He invested his money in the borough’s happiness, and both he and the people have drawn generous dividends. His figure, familiar to all who frequent the Green, will be sadly missed. He lived a simple life and of recent years rarelt went out of the borough.

His chief recreation was reading, and for the last ten years he has read little other than books about millionaires, successful businessman and industrialists, or men who, like himself, had risen from obscurity to a place in the world. Following The Fortunes of Lord Nuffield, Henry Ford, the Cadburys and others, he sought comparisons with his own success, and compared their manner of spending their fortune with his own.

The bombing of the Wilson Hospital, which was closed for some time, was a great blow to him, and the town will be glad that he lived to see it repaired and at work again.

Sir Isaac Wilson

The Swan Garage

Motor dealer and garage near the Swan pub on the western side of London Road, south of Eveline Road.

Business owned by Bertie Cyril DENDY.

He was married on 3rd August 1910 to Lilian Beatrice Mary MANSFIELD, aged 25, of 7 Spencer Road, Cottenham Park, Wimbledon. Her father is shown on the marriage certificate as Thomas Mansfield, carpenter. Bertie Dendy, also at the same address has his occupation shown as Coach Builder, the same as his father Adolphus.

The 1911 census shows him as a wheelwright:
Address: The Oakwood, London Road, Mitcham, Surrey

Adolphus DENDY, head, born 1854, aged 57, wheelwright
Frances Sarah Dendy, wife, born 1852, aged 59, married 33 years
Bertie Dendy, son, born 1881, aged 30, wheelwright
Lilian Beatrice Mary Dendy, son’s wife, born 1891, aged 20

His father Adolphus is listed in the 1915 street directory as a wheelwright at The Oakwoods, north of Oakwood Terrace. Adolphus Dendy was a District Chairman in 1907, and also landlord of the Ship pub. In the 1918 Kelly directory, Adolphus Dendy is listed as carriage & motor dealer.

From the 1925 street directory, listed in London Road going south:

Eveline villas :
10, William Arthur VLEACH
9, Ernest Alfred ARTHUR
8, Hugh ANDERSON
7, William DRAKEFORD
6, Latham Charles LATHAM

…. here is Eveline road

5, Sidney BOREHAM
3, J. W. AUSTIN & Son, provision dealers
2, Ernest REEVE, butcher
1, Miss L. FROUDE, confectioner

B. DENDY motor engineer
The Mitcham Cabinet Works (E. W. CLIFTON & C. OLDHAM, proprietors)
Swan inn, Roy DALE
B. DENDY motor engineer
Mrs. DENDY (The Oakwoods)

From the London Gazette, 2nd February, 1937:

NOTICE is hereby given that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us, the undersigned
Bertie Cyril Dendy and Arthur Henry Stanforth carrying on businees as Garage Proprietors at 174
London Road, Mitcham in the county of Surrey under the style or firm of “THE SWAN GARAGE”
has been dissolved by mutual consent as from the thirteenth day of December 1936. All debts due and owing to or by the late firm win be respectively received and paid by the said Berne Cyril Dendy.

The said business will be carried on in the future by the said Bertie Cyril Dendy.

—As witness our hands this 25th day of January 1937.

ARTHUR HENRY STAINFORTH.

BERTIE CYRIL DENDY.

Norwood News 5th May 1937 via the British Newspaper Archive

Norwood News – Friday 15th October 1937

MITCHAM’S SOLE AGENTS B. C. Dendy and Co.. Ltd., 180, London-road, Mitcham, has an advantage over other motor-dealers in Mitcham as he is the only agent in Mitcham for Morris and Ford cars. This advantage is also an advantage for prospective buyers of cars residing within easy reach of Mitcham, as one is able to see the car one wants in comfort.

Ford, of course, is known to all, as since 1903 the Ford organisation has made and sold over 25,000,000 ears. This unique record in manufacturing has only been made possible by the unusual value which Ford cars offer. The Ford “Ten” is the latest addition to Ford high-value ears, and one of the most outstanding announced for many years. It marks a new stage in the evolution of enjoyable but inexpensive motoring, offering exceptional roominess, high engineering quality. assured reliability, with remarkable economy.

His other sole agency. that of Morris cars, gives prospective buyers the opportunity of examining cars which have a reputation for fast, safe, and comfortable riding. The Morris “24” is designed in such a way that the most careful attention has been paid to those three dominating points.

The new overhead valve power unit has been thoroughly proved over an eveonsive mileage and combines surging power with the absolute reliability and smooth running for which Morris engines have been famed in the past. With a top speed of 70 miles per hour and an mildly impressive performance on the lower gears, it is more than capable of holding its own even with cars of much higher horsepower. It Is the car for the man who desires comfortable motoring.

Listed in the 1938 commercial directory as B.C. Dendy & Co., motor car agents, 174 London Road.

1936/7 Nalder & Collyer’s sale to Ind Coope

Brewery Distribution

An unusual linking of brewery interest is brought to notice by an announcement to-day from Nalder & Collyer’s Brewery Co. (Ltd.) This Company has a capital of £660,000 in £130,000 Ordinary and £530,000 Preference shares. Practically all the Ordinary and 90 per cent, of the Preference are held by the City of London Brewery and Investment Trust (Ltd.) This latter, now mainly an investment trust, has a considerable holding in Ind Coope & Allsopp (Ltd.) and also an indirect interest in Ind Coope through Nalder & Collyer, which in March last year sold a number of its properties to Ind Coope & Allsopp (Ltd.) for a total consideration of £2,200,353, paid partly in cash and partly in Ind Coope Debentures, Preference, and Ordinary stocks.

The directors of Nalder & Collyer are now going to distribute part of the Ind Coope Ordinary to the Company’s Ordinary shareholders and the bulk of these shares will of course go to the City of London Brewery and Investment Trust (Ltd.) For every £10 Nalder & Collyer Ordinary will be given £2 of Ind Coope Ordinary, making the total distribution £26,000 nominal, worth at the current market price £162,500. Accompanying this announcement is a final dividend of 20 per cent plus a 10 per cent cash bonus, making, with the interim of 25 per cent., a total of 55 per cent, as before, which of course also goes mainly to the controlling company. There is a free market in City of London Brewery 5s Deferred Ordinary units now standing around 20s. a price which indicates long-standing hopes of a capital bonus. Last year’s dividend was only 6 per cent. The next accounts are to June 30 next and are due in July.

Source: The Scotsman – Friday 07 May 1937 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

Nalder & Collyer owned the Horse and Groom, Kings Head (later Burn Bullock), Ravensbury Arms, Three Kings, Swan, Windmill.

Ernie Chambers cycle shop

Cycle shop at 105 London Road, north of and next to the Gardeners Arms pub. Owned and run by Ernie Chambers.

Image courtesy of Collage - The London Picture Library - http://collage.cityoflondon.gov.uk

1973 Image courtesy of Collage – The London Picture Library – http://collage.cityoflondon.gov.uk

Opened in 1936 or 1937, as described in the Mitcham Town Guide of 1937:

… a newly established business, but old in experience. Ernie Chambers, whom you can regard as your friend and adviser, has been in the cycle trade for many years, and can back this up with a wealth of cycle racing experience, vouched for by the fact that he has ridden for England in three Olympiads, in 1928, 1932 and 1935, a record unequalled by any other cyclist. Here then is a real cyclist that understands a cyclist’s needs. All the leading makes of cycles are stocked. Everything for the cyclist who uses his machine for business, touring, racing or pleasure.

All repairs are promptly and skilfully executed on the premises no job too large or too small.


Adverts

1937 ad

1937 ad

1952 ad

1952 ad

Text of ad:

ERNIE CHAMBERS for ..
Cycle and Cycle-Motors

Power Pak
Hand Built 49 c.c. bicycle motor

Cash or Easy Terms

25 Guineas (terms available)
12 Months Guarantee

105 London Road, Mitcham

MITcham 2021