Tag Archives: 1912

Waterloo Place

Waterloo Place was a row of 3 houses on the west side of London Road, near to where Dennis Reeve Close is now.

The 1912 street directory lists the properties from north to south:

Here is Crusoe Road …

Thomas TAYLOR (Carlingford)
F. & G. MIZEN, market gardeners
John ELMER
Mrs Ruth PARRISH, tobacconist

Manor View:
6, Mrs KILLICK
5, Henry HISTED
4, James GARDNER
3, Edward TANNER
2, William J MEECH, confectioner
1, Mrs George TAYLOR, poultry dealer

Waterloo Place:
1, Figg’s Marsh hand laundry
2, William HARRISON
3, William LAMB

Ellis JEEVES, carman (2 Thanet cottages)
David GODDARD (2 Poplar cottages)
Herbert DODD, carpenter (1 Poplar cottages)
Edward FULLER, florist (The Poplars)

Eveline Villas:

The OS map of 1911 shows a single house on the south side of Crusoe Road at the corner of London Road, and this may have been Carlingford. Then there are no buildings until Tamworth Farm, in occupation by F & G Mizen. Then there are two separate buildings, presumed to be John Elmer and Mrs Ruth Parrish.

Then there are 3 pairs of houses, and this is assumed to be Manor View, which are numbered 6 down to 1. South of this is a row of 3 houses, and this is assumed to be Waterloo Place.

Combined OS map of 1911 and the street directory of 1912

1912 : Mitcham Fire Brigade get a Merryweather Fire Engine

From the minutes of the Mitcham Parish Council on 30th July 1912:

To the Fire Brigade Committee,

Gentlemen,

I beg to report that the Demonstration of the New Petrol Motor Fire Engine, carried out by the Brigade on July 27th under the instructions of Messrs. Merryweather’s representative, was satisfactory in every way, both as regards augmenting the amount of pressure of water available in the mains and also for river work, together with deep suction lifts (see attached figures of tests.)

In view of meeting the capabilities of the new engine I would suggest that additional hose and extra stand-pipes be carried to enable the Brigade to collect the water from a few hydrants when necessary.

It is a pleasure to state that from a practical point of view the Council now possess one of the best combinations of machinery for fire protection that is possible to obtain.

Yours obediently,

A.L. JENNER, Superintendent

clip from Merton Memories photo reference Mit_Public_Services_7-4 copyright London Borough of Merton

The tests referred to in the minutes above showed that mains pressure, from street hydrants, was 50 lbs per square inch but at the hoses this was reduced to at worse 33 lbs. The new fire engine though brought the pressure up to 200 lbs. When drawing from the river Wandle, with a 10ft. vertical suction lift, 120 to 200 lbs pf pressure was achieved.

It was proposed by Mr J.M. Leather, and seconded by Mr A. Dendy, that the Council write to the Metropolitan water Board to draw their attention to the low pressure in the mains.

The Fire Brigade Committee recommended that the current steam fire engine be sold, with adverts placed in the “West Sussex Gazette”, “The Fireman” and other suitable papers.

Mr E.E. Mizen proposed that an additional £20 be added to the fire brigade budget for the new hose and stand-pipes suggested by the superintendent. He noted that this would bring said budget up to £290.

The Clerk reported that after the demonstration, the members of the Council, the two Fire Brigades and the Superintendents of several of the neighbouring Brigades, were entertained with a substantial meal at the Vestry Hall.

In the report to the Finance Committee, a cheque for £224 15s. was paid to Merryweather & Son for the motor engine.


Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Parish Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

Mitcham Rifle Club before 1914

BRIGHTON RAILWAY v. MITCHAM. Won by Brighton. Scores : Brighton Railway.—P. Jackson, 99; F. Nightingale, 98; P. Bates, 97; C. Streeter, 96; E. Fox, 96; G. Burt, 94 ; G. Clayton, 94; J. Fox, 93—total, 767. Mitcham Railway.— A. Dalziel, 96; J. Baker, 95 ; J. Rompel, 92; A. Baker, 91; S. Chart, 88; J. White, 88; W. Tullett, 87; H. White, 87—total, 724.

Source: Croydon Chronicle and East Surrey Advertiser – Saturday 24 February 1912 from the British Newspaper Archive

MITCHAM R.C. v. “OLD BOYS” HIGH SCHOOL.

At Mitcham. Scores :
Mitcham. — L. W. Munday, 97; H. W. White, 96; J. B. Rompel, 96; J. A. Baker, 95 ; J. D. Clarke, 95; A. Dalziel, 95; J. White, 93; R. Robinson, 93. Total, 760.

“Old Boys.” – C. W. Hall, 100; D. Mc- Kerchar, 99; L. E. Hall, 97 ; L. Jones, 95; R. K. Batstone, 95; R. E. English, 94; G. L. Bailey, 91; A. Brown, 83. Total, 754.

Source: Croydon Chronicle and East Surrey Advertiser – Saturday 06 April 1912 from the British Newspaper Archive

“W” DIVISION POLICE v. MITCHAM

— Won by “W” Division Police. Scores : Police.—P.c Baker. 85; P.s. Blacklaws, 92; P.c. Wilson, 93; P.c. Talbot, 99; P.c. Cleaver, 94; P.c. Wilkie. 100; P.c. Alder, 93; P.c. Jackson, 92. Total, 750.

Mitcham — Mr. Guyatt, 84; Mr. J. White, 81; Mr. J. B. Rompel, 86; Mr. J. A. Baker, 90; Mr. A. Jenner. 92; Mr. Philpot, 92; Mr. J. White, 84; Mr. S. Chart, 82. Total, 691.

ADDISCOMBE R.C. v. MITCHAM R.C.

— Won by Addiscombe.

Scores:-
Addiscombe. — G. Foster, 95; A. F. Knight, 93; W. E. Harvey, 96; A. Dixon, 99; H. C. Pressland, 97; A. Cotterell, 94; T. Hooker, 95; F. C. Burgess, Si. Total. 763.

Mitcham. — Philpot , 93; Munday, 97; A. Jenner. 90; J. B. Rompel. 89: J. A. Baker, S. Chart, 85; G. Wyatt, 85; J. White, 94. Total, 704.

Source: Croydon Chronicle and East Surrey Advertiser – Saturday 28 October 1911 from the British Newspaper Archive

Edward Snell Crewes

Grocer and sub-postmaster of Upper Mitcham from after 1901 to 1932. Listed in the 1930 commercial directory as

Crewes Edwd. Snell, grocer & sub-postmaster, 19 Upper grn. east. T N 0840

early 20th century view of ES Crewes's shop and postoffice

early 20th century view of ES Crewes’s shop and postoffice

Edward Snell Crewes was originally from Cornwall, as he points out in a letter about eggs from that county he was selling at the post office.

In the 1901 census, he was listed as a grocer and they were living in the parish of Tong, in Bradford, Yorkshire. They had a daughter aged 2, called Millicent M. A public family tree on Ancestry says that Millicent Marjorie Crewes died in 1904 in Epsom.

In the 1911 census, he was shown as being 43 and having been born in about 1868 in Truro, Cornwall. His wife Lydia, also 43, was born in Mount Hawke, Cornwall and their son Stanley M B aged 15 also lived with them at the post office. He was born in Bradford, Yorkshire.

He died 29th May 1932, and left £4,381 13s. 1d. to his wife. The probate entry on Ancestry shows his middle name as Ivell.

His wife Lydia, nee Bennett, died 1947.

World War 1 Connections
Gunner Stanley Maxwell Crewes

Related News Articles

DEATH OF HERO.

—We are sorry to learn that Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Crewes, of the Upper Mitcham Post Office, have this week sustained a bereavement which is unusually sad owing the circumstances related below. On Monday Mr. Harry Bennetts, Mount Hawke, Cornwall, Mrs. Crewes’ brother, died at his home there after being ill for some time from a disease know as miner’s phthisis,” which he contracted in South Africa. Mr. Bennetts was an experienced miner, having worked in the mines of Montana and Idaho, United States, for two different periods, and in the gold mines in South Africa. Last December while working at the Raudfontein South Gold Mine, Krugersdorp. there was an explosion of gelatine which caused the death of four miners by asphyxia, and Mr. Bennetts made a effort to rescue a number of native workers who had been overcome by the fumes. He descended to a depth of 200-ft. under circumstances which called for the greatest courage, and as a result his heroic action was reported the King, who, as stated, awarded him the Edward Medal. About three weeks ago he returned to his home in Cornwall broken in health, and although he had a fine physique, he succumbed to the disease which is the bane of all miners. No doubt it was made worse by his experiences in the mine after the explosion. An Interesting point is that neither the deceased nor his relatives were aware that the medal for bravery had been awarded him, and it is supposed that the medal must have been sent to his last known address in South Africa. Probably it is now on its way back to England. Mr. Crewes brought the facts to the notice of King George in a letter that be wrote to him on Tuesday.

Source: Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 28 May 1910 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)


To the Editor of the West Briton

Sir,

— About three years ago you published letter of mine drawing the attention of farmers and dealers to the bad condition of new-laid eggs that were being for warded the Metropolis. To my great regret I must again write to tell your agricultural readers the very undesirable fact that large numbers of eggs which are absolutely rotten are being packed in cases labelled “English New-laid Eggs,” and sent in this direction from the delectable Duchy. One customer of mine to-day brought back three bad eggs she had out of ten, and several others have also expressed their disgust at my selling them as new-laid eggs. If sellers and senders in Cornwall could realise the damaging effect these things have and retail business in this part the country, they would be more careful and considerate, and not take money for new-laid eggs unless the eggs can honestly bear that designation. I appeal their sense justice, and ask them not pack eggs they have discovered in secluded spots on their hedges, without caring how long they have been laid.

Of late, eggs coming from Russia have been more reliable than those purchased from Cornwall, and at much less money. For the future I shall have to carefully examine all the Cornish eggs I sell. Being a Cornishman myself, I am very jealous of the good name of my native county. Trusting that the writing of this letter will have beneficial results.

Yours truly. E SNELL CREWES,
Post Office,
Upper Mitcham, S.W.

Source: West Briton and Cornwall Advertiser – Thursday 27 June 1912 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

Charles H. Blume

chas-h-blume-postcard

Carl Hans Blume was born 18/10/1847 in Schönebeck, and died 15/02/1919 in Magdeburg, Germany.

After working as an accountant and then salesman with various paint/varnish companies in Magdeburg, he set up a company with a colleague in 1873 called Blume & Knopf. The company quickly grew from modest beginnings to become well-known market leaders for high-quality paints and special varnishes, which were used for coaches, cars, bicycles, sewing machines, paper mills and a wide range of other industrial products. In 1875 he set up on his own, using land bought in Magdeburg, trading as Carl Hans Blume, Lackfabrik, which supplied the German navy, military and state works, railway companies and many other industrial enterprises on a large scale. In addition, he was able to start exporting its products to European countries at an early stage. In the summer of 1893, a first branch factory was erected in Mitcham, followed by a branch office in Paris before the First World War.

After his factory was confiscated in 1916 under the Trading With The Enemy Act, he returned to Germany. The company was run by his eldest son, also called Carl (1878-1921), who had been trained in England, then his second son Hermann (1882-1943) from 1921-43, later by his third son, Paul (1884-1951). The business survived the second world war, but as Magdeburg came under East Germany, it was appropriated in 1948.

Source: University of Magdeburg biography on Carl Blume (in German)

From the 1912 Directory & Chronicle for China, Japan, Corea, Indo-China …
1912-blume-ad

1912-blume-ad-page

1912-blume-enamels-entry

1912-blume-varnishes-entry

Owner of varnish factory in Western Road that was closed down and sold off at auction in 1916.

Blume’s factory mentioned in 1902 Mitcham Parochial minutes.

From the 1910 Cycle and Motorcycle Exhibition on Grace’s Guide

Chas. H Blume.
Mitcham, Surrey.

Stand No. 244.

This firm is famed for brilliant and long wearing enamels, and some very fine samples of cycle stove enamels, black and coloured, mudguards and gear case enamels, silver paint, air drying enamels, etc. One of the firm’s latest lines is the “Marrow Grey” and “Bamboo” rust proof priming ; it should be noted that the use of these rust proof primings does not exclude the use of the ordinary rubber or first coat black enamel, which may still be used as an intermediary coating, but is not necessary ; two coats of finishing for the rust proof metallic priming gives very excellent results and a very fair finish is obtained with one coat of black for the priming ; a point in favour of the priming is that it “carries” or “fills” better than the ordinary black first coat, and is equivalent in bodying up to two coats of ordinary enamel.

We learn that tubes treated with this rust proof priming have been exposed continually to rain and damp for six and eight months without any lifting taking place.

This exhibit is certainly one of the most interesting and instructive in the Hall.


From the minutes of the Mitcham Parish Council
Volume 11 April 1913 to March 1914
Report of the No. 1 Fire Brigade Committee
27th January, 1914

Page 162

                              Western Road,
                              Mitcham, Surrey,
                              17th January, 1914

To Superintendent A. Jenner,
   Mitcham Fire Brigade,
                  Mitcham.

Dear Sir,

Allow me to express to you once more my feelings of indebtedness and sincere recognition for the very prompt effective assistance which you and your men have rendered to us on Thursday last.

As the outbreak occurred at night time the extent of the fire would indeed have been quite disastrous, but for your timely and efficient help.

Please be good enough to convey these sentiments to your men and express to one and all of them my grateful thanks.

                     I remain,
                         Yours faithfully,
                             p. p. CHAS. H. BLUME,
                                K. STRUBE,
                                    Manager.

Page 161

The Superintendent’s Reports were submitted

Jan 15th … Fire at Blume’s Factory … £2 9s. 6d.

The Superintendent reported that an additional fire hydrant is required near Mr. C. Blume’s factory, and the Committee recommend –

That the Croydon Rural District Council be requested to fix the hydrant in Western Road.


Closed down in 1916

under the Trading with the Enemy law, citing Charles H. Blume as an enemy.

See order of London Gazette, 13th June 1916

TRADING WITH THE ENEMY AMENDMENT ACT, 1916.
Orders have been made by the Board of Trade requiring the undermentioned businesses
to be wound up : —

Charles H. Blume, Western Road,
Mitcham, Surrey. Varnish and Enamel Manufacturer.
Controller: John William
Barratt, 19a, Coleman Street, London, E.C.
9 June, 1916.

and 10th October 1916

Final Notice.

In the Matter of the Trading with the Enemy Act 1916, and in the Matter of CHARLES H. BLUME,
an Enemy Subject.

WHEREAS by Order made by the Board of Trade, dated the 9th June, 1916, under the
provisions of the above mentioned Act, the business carried on in the United Kingdom, of the above named Charles H. Blume was ordered to be wound up, notice is hereby given, that any persons claiming to be creditors of the said business carried on by the said Charles H. Blume who have not already sent in their claims are required to send, by prepaid post, to John William Barratt, Chartered Accountant, of 19a, Coleman-street, London, E.C., the Controller appointed by the said order, on or before the 16th day of November, 1916, their Christian and surnames, addresses and descriptions, with full particulars of their debts or claims, or in default thereof they will
be excluded from the benefit of the said order.
—Dated this 10th day of October, 1916.
J.W. BARRATT, Controller.

For details of stock at time of auction, see Western Daily Press – Thursday 20 July 1916 from the British Newspaper Archives (subscription required)

IN the MATTER of the TRADING with the ENEMY AMENDMENT ACT, 1916, and in the MATTER of CHARLES H. BLUME, WESTERN ROAD, MITCHAM, SURREY.

By an Order of the Board Trade, dated 9th June, 1916, under Section 1 the above-mentioned Act, relative to the above firm, I, the undersigned John William Barratt of 19a, Coleman Street, London, E.C., Chartered Accountant, was appointed to control and supervise the carrying out the said order and to conduct the winding up of the firm’s business.

Notice is hereby given that the Creditors the said firm are required before the 25th day of August 1916 to send their Names and Addresses and the particular, of their DEBTS and CLAIMS the names of their Solicitors (if any) to me the undersigned Controller at address aforesaid and required notice writing from are their solicitors or personally to come in and prove their said Debts or Claims at time and place as may be specified in such notice or in default thereof they will be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before Debts are so proved.

Any property or business effects of the said firm should delivered to me and all Debts due to the said firm should paid to me forthwith. J. W. BARRATT, Controller. Dated this 20th day of July, 1916.

Auction of stock in 1916
Birmingham Daily Post – Wednesday 04 October 1916

Re Chas H. BLUME. VARNISH MANUFACTURER, MITCHAM. SURREY. By Order J. W. Barrett. Esq., F.C-A., the Controller appointed by the Board Trade Messrs, Fuller, Horsey, sons, & Cassell, having Disposed the Freehold Works and the Goodwill of the Business, will Offer for Sale by Auction lots the Premises, Western Road. Mitcham, on FRIDAY, October 13, 1916. 1030 o’clock precisely.

THE STOCK-IN-TRADE, including 16,000 gallons Oil Varnish. 500 gallons Spirit Varnish Polish, and Lacquers, 3,000 gallons Storing and Air-drying Black Enamels and Japans, quantity Coloured Stoving and Air-drying Enamels. 2,600 Boiled. Perilla, and Wood Oils. 8 1/2 tons various Gums 8 tons Resin. 16 tons Pitch. 25cwt. Asphaltum. 2 tons Litharge. 13 tons Dry Colours. 2 tons Lithopona. 500 gallons Benzine. Naphtha Rubber Solvent. Benzole, and Turps; large quantity Orates, Cans &c.

Also the Loose Plant and Utensils, Office Furniture Typewriters. Safes, and numerous other effects.

May be Viewed Two Days Preceding and Morning of Sale, and Catalogues (when ready) may be had of Messrs. Nicholson, Graham and Jones, Solicitors, 24. Coleman Street. EC.; Messrs. J Barratt and Co.. Chartered Accountants. 19a. Coleman Street. E.C, and 75. New Street. Birmingham; or Messrs Fuller, Horsey, and Co.. 11, Billiter Square. E.C.

Bought by Hadfield in 1917, see Surrey History Centre record.


From Grace’s Guide:

HUTCHINGS, Arthur, A.M.I.E.E., Cons. Elec. Engr.; b. 1868; s. of late William Medlin Hutchings (Editor and Publisher of ” The Colliery Guardian ” ). Ed. Privately. Training: Finsbury Tech. Coll. Career: Head of Testing Dept., Elec. Eng. Corpn., Ltd., West Drayton, 1888; Chief Designer, J. G. Stalter & Co., Ltd., London, 1891; Designer, Deptl. Mangr. and Works Lecturer, Crompton & Co., Ltd., Chelmsford, 1894; Mangr., Elec. Windings Dept., Vickers, Ltd., Sheffield, 1905; Mangr., Insulating Varnish Dept., Chas. H. Blume, Mitcham, 1910; Ditto, Jenson & Nicholson, Ltd., Stratford, E., 1916; Asst. Engr. (War Service), Metropolitan Electric Tramways, Ltd., 1917; Commercial and Tech. Mangr. and Director, Acme Electric Traction Co., Ltd., Tottenham, 1919. Address: 15, Penton Place, King’s Cross, London, W.C.I. T. N.: North 2680.


Minutes of meetings held by the Croydon Rural District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.