Tag Archives: 1889

Street Lighting – Gas

Merton Memories photos

Next to milestone, without glass
1950 opposite Kings Head
Causeway
Three gas lamps along Causeway in 1909
Outside Vestry Hall in 1902
1870 from Causeway towards White House

Stories

Saturday 7th September 1889

MITCHAM.

The Lighting Question.

— A public meeting the ratepayers the parish was held the Vestry Hall on Thursday evening for the purpose of considering the expediency of rescinding the following resolution, passed at meeting of the ratepayers of the parish the 29th day of October, 1853 ; “Resolved unanimously that the number inspectors carry into execution the provisions of the Act, third and fourth William IV., cap. 90, in this parish (so far as relates to lighting) be seven,” and of passing resolution enabling the Vestry elect such inspectors with those already in office will make a total number of twelve inspectors of lighting for the parish.

— Dr. J. Ferrier Clarke, Vicars warden, having been voted to the chair, he informed the meeting that solicitors’ and counsel’s opinion had been asked upon the question, and a telegram had just been received to the effect that it was impossible, in consequence of being vacation the Courts, get counsel’s decision until Monday, when the matter could be considered at the adjourned Vestry meeting to be held on that day.

— Mr. Dungate, of the Singlegate Ratepayers’ Association, moved that the business on, and his motion was seconded by Mr. Wortley and carried.

— Messrs. Nobes, John Nicholls, and Dr. Love having spoken against, and Dr. Kemshead, the Rev. Mr. Richman, and others, in favour, it was put to the meeting with the following result: For 31, against 28.

— As the beaten party challenged the figures, it was decided that all ratepayers present should have their names taken down by the chairman, which resulted in the figures being altered to : For 34, against 23.

— It was then proposed by Mr. Wortley and seconded by Mr. Newman that the number increased to 12, and as only six voted against it was carried.

— Mr. Phil. Sampson, senr., as usual, interrupted every speaker who did not agree with him, and the Gas Company whipped up all their officials to oppose the rescinding of the resolution vote thanks to the chairman closed the meeting, which was of a rather lively character.

Source: Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 07 September 1889 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)


Saturday 10th August 1889

MITCHAM AND THE LIGHTING QUESTION.

PROPOSAL TO LIGHT WITH OIL.

An Adjourned meeting of the Mitcham Ratepayers’ Association was held in the Boys’ School, Lower Mitcham, on Wednesday evening, to again discuss the question of the lighting of the district. Mr. Sandall was voted to the chair, and amongst those present were Messrs. W. Jenner, J. Brown, Wright, G. Bullock, W. Thomas, Dungate, Gardner, Muad, W. Tilley, A. R. Harwood, Wortley, Hill, Langridge, Blackstone, Tomlin, Jordan, W. Barter, and Dr. Kemshead.

The Chairman, in opening the proceedings, explained the objects of the association to those who were not yet members of it, assuring them that by attending Vestry meetings and keeping a watchful eye on those officers who were paid by the ratepayers, their interests were safeguarded and abuses rendered next to impossible. Public officers were likely to become lax in the performance of their duties if such a body as the Ratepayers’ Association were not in existence to watch their movements. Coming to the subject to consider which that meeting was held, he unfolded the plan the sub-committee, previously appointed, had resolved to recommend. At present the parish was lighted by the Gas Company for nine months out of the twelve from sunset to half-past one o’clock in the morning at a charge of £3 per lamp per annum. What the committee suggested was that oil should be adopted instead, when the lamps could be lighted every night all the year round at a charge that would not exceed £2 9s. 6d. per lamp per annum. He pointed out that this estimate was a literal one, and would allow them a fair margin to work upon, as Wimbledon, which had adopted oil lighting, was able to carry it out satisfactorily at an annual cost of £2 6s. 8d. per lamp. The present system of lighting by gas, he said, was a most unsatisfactory one. Reckoning each lamp to burn five cubic feet of gas per hour, and the cost 3s. 10d. per 1,000 feet, he was certain that they were paying the Gas Company more than they ought to. They were therefore justified in the course they proposed to take, and if they were well supported it would probably have the effect of bringing the Gas Company round, and making an offer to light the lamps every night all year round, at £3 per lamp, the old terms. If the ratepayers resolved to adopt oil lighting, it would mean saving to them every year over the price of gas of 10s. 6d. per lamp, and that surely was something worth striving after. (Applause.)

Dr. Kemshead then presented a report on the subject he had been instructed to prepare. He said as at present arranged, with no lamps from May to August, they might take it that if the lamps were lighted for the period ending in May from 8.30 p.m. to 1.30 a.m., and for the period ending December from 3.30 p.m. to 1.30 a.m., the average would be 7 1/2 hours per night ; whilst if they were kept alight every night in the year the average would be nine hours per night. Now, what was the consumption gas? Each lamp consumed five cubic feet of gas per hour, which, calculated at nine hours per night all the year round, would give a consumption of 3,304 cubic feet per lamp per year, which, again, at 3s. 10d. per 1,000 cubic feet, would amount in the year to £824 18s. 8d. or for nine months to £6lB 14s. At 7 1/2 hours per night all the year round the cost would be £687 8s. 7d., and for nine months £464 0s. 6d. Thus while the Gas Company at present lighted the lamps for an average of 7 1/2 hours per night for nine months and charged £804 12s., while gas consumed at their own price cost £6l8 14s., they evidently charged a good deal more than they had a right to. The cost of oil-lighting he estimated as follows:- Oil, per year, £351; labour of five men in the lighting, extinguishing, and cleaning of the lamps 30s. per week each, wicks, breakages, and sundries, £34; total, £645. This gave cost of £2 9s. 5d. per lamp per year, and this showed annual saving, compared with gas, of £167 14s. Along with this saving there would light all the year round from sunset to sunrise. Dr Kemshead suggested that the Gas Company should again be communicated with, and another meeting of the ratepayers held before the August Vestry meeting, to decide upon their final course of action. He believed if the company were properly approached they would not object to a compromise.

Mr. Wortley next addressed the meeting. He contended that the oil lamps the association had on view gave a much better light than gas, and could see no feasible reason why oil should not be adopted for future lighting purposes.

Mr. Dungate pointed out that better gas was made in the Workhouse at 1s. 6d. per 1,000, and 3s. 10d. per 1,000 charged by the Gas Company was exorbitant. He believed that the Lighting Inspectors would not move without pressure from the ratepayers through the Ratepayers’ Association, many of the ratepayers being afraid of them. He held that if once they resolved to have oil they would never again resort to gas, but before they did anything he was of the opinion that it would be wise to again approach the Gas Company. (Hear, hear.)

Mr. Tomlin then moved the following resolution:- “That the secretaries of the two Ratepayers’ Associations be instructed to write to the directors of the Gas Company asking if the company is prepared light all the street lamps from sunset to sunrise all the year round for per lamp per annum.’’ Mr. Tomlin remarked that they did not wish to do the company any harm, but they were determined to have value for their money. (Applause.)

Mr. Thomas seconded the resolution, which was then adopted unanimously. The following resolution was also unanimously adopted on the proposition of Mr. Dungate, seconded by Mr. Wortley:- “That no person be voted for at the coming election of inspectors unless such person pledges himself to obtain considerable reduction in the price of gas, or failing that to consent to light the parish with oil.””

Tbe Chairman urged upon those present not to forget to attend the next Vestry meeting, and to do their best place the question of oil-lighting before tbeir fellow-ratepayers. After some further discussion, a vote of thanks was accorded to the chairman, and the proceedings concluded.

Source: from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)


Two advertisements requesting tenders for 50 iron lamp posts and a supply of gas. From the South Eastern Gazette 8th November 1853

CONTRACT for the SUPPLY of FIFTY IRON LAMP POSTS, with lamps and fittings complete for lighting the same with Gas, for the parish of Mitcham, at per post, etc., including the fixing in such parts of the parish as may be determined by the inspectors.
Persons desirous of contracting for the above are requested to send in their tenders to the Buck’s Head Inn, Mitcham, on or before the 22nd November instant, directed to the Secretary to the Inspectors. The Board will not pledge themselves to accept the lowest or any tender.
By order of the Board,
FRANCIS NEWMAN,
Secretary.
Nov, 4th, 1853.

CONTRACT for the SUPPLY of GAS in the Public Lamps of the parish of Mitcham, at per 1000 feet. Persons willing to undertake the above contract, during the winter months, are requested to send in their tenders to the Buck’s Head Inn, Mitcham, on or before the 22nd November instant, directed to the Secretary to the Inspectors. The Board will not pledge themselves to accept the lowest or any tender.
By order of the Board,
FRANCIS NEWMAN, Secretary.
Nov. 4th, 1853.


Volunteer Fire Brigade

Mitcham’s fire brigade was a volunteer service until 1920, when Albert Wells was appointed Chief Officer. He introduced retaining fees for the chief and sub officers at each station, and remunerations for drills and call-outs for the firemen.

Stories from the British Newspaper Archive

(subscription required)

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 07 September 1889

The Volunteer Fire Brigade.

—The annual test drill of the brigade took place on Wednesday evening, when the men mustered in full force and arrived at the tanyard, Beddington Corner, with their engine punctually at six p.m., and in about three minutes got to work with one jet. To this was shortly added another, junction being made in the hose about ten yards from the engine ; another connection was rapidly made from the engine with additional hose, and three powerful jets of water were concentrated on point where an imaginary fire was raging. A correspondent who witnessed the drill is of opinion that from observations made and the excellent espirit de corps shown the men, that this, as an entirely volunteer brigade, in a position to cope with any emergency which may arise in the vicinity. An essential point with men who give their time and labour gratis is having confidence in their leader, and this the Mitcham men certainly have in Superintendent A. R. Harwood. The following members of the committee were present to witness the proceedings, viz., Mr. S. Wells (chairman), Mr. Harwood, sen., Dr. Love, Mr. Sampson, and Mr. S. Love.


Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 23 February 1889

MITCHAM.
The Mitcham Volunteer Fire Brigade.

— The committee of this brigade entertained the members to dinner on Wednesday evening, at the Old Nag’s Head, Upper Mitcham. Mr. Wells, the chairman committee, occupied the chair, and Mr. A. R. Harwood, the superintendent of the brigade, the vice-chair. There were present Messrs. W. R. Harwood, Dr. Love, F. G. Sampson, R. M Chart. S. Love, and W. Jenner, members of the committee, and the brigade with the turncock and call-boys. An excellent repast was put upon the table by Mr Tomlin, and served in his best style, to which ample justice was done. The usual loyal toasts were also given, with that of the brigade, committee, &c. and a most enjoyable evening was spent. During the evening some capital songs were rendered by Messrs Shepherd, Brown, Dill, Turner, and others.


Agricultural Express – Saturday 25 February 1893

MITCHAM.

FIRE.

—On Thursday morning a fire, which originated in a store used for frying fish, broke out at 2, Rock-terrace. The rafters in the chimney had caught alight, but the volunteer fire brigade were able to extinguish the flames with a few buckets of water. The house was occupied by woman named Patience Stone.


Cock Chimney Factory in Batsworth Road

A local landmark in Batsworth Road, off Church Road, Mitcham. It is possible it may have been built in mid 19th century. The land was sold to London Borough of Merton in late 1960s, and the area is now occupied by a trading estate.

The firm of Donald Macpherson occupied the site until 1969, and the chimney had their brand ‘Foochow’ in letters running down the side of the chimney. Macpherson was started in 1884 as a paint, varnish and Chinese lacquer business, based in Manchester. The company’s telegram address was ‘Foochow, Manchester’.

Macphersons Trade Paints became part of the Crown Paints Group in 2008.

The chimney was first mentioned in Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 17 August 1889 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

Fatal Fall from a Chimney.

—An inquest was held at the Mortuary on Saturday last before Mr. R. D. Muir, deputy coroner, and a jury, concerning the death of Thomas H. Haslam, 25, Cow Cross-street, St. Luke’s, an engineer’s fitter. It appeared that on the previous Thursday the deceased, with a labourer, was sent to some repairs to what is known the “Cock” chimney at a varnish factory in Church-lane, and, having engaged lodgings at 15, Holmwood-road, proceeded to inspect the shaft.

Having ascended to some considerable height, deceased by some means lost his hold and fell with great force to the bottom.

Medical aid was summoned, and the man removed to his lodgings, where expired the same night.

The jury having viewed the body and having heard the medical and other evidence, and the Deputy-Coroner very carefully summed up, a verdict of “Accidental Death” was returned.


1945 ad

Donald Macpherson co. Ltd., Cock Chimney Works, Mitcham (paint manufacturers), require the following clerical staff: 2 Invoice Clerks. Order Clerks, Shorthand-Typists, Telephone Operator; good post-war prospects, possibility of advancement. Please reply to the above address or telephone for appointment, Mitcham 2963.

Source: Surrey Advertiser – Saturday 13 January 1945 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)


aerial photo from 1947 and 1952 OS map

aerial photo from 1947 and 1952 OS map

Merton Memories Photos
JJ Schweizer
Foochow
1970

From the phone book

1910

1910

In the 1896 street directory, listed as John Jacob Schweizer, varnish manufacturer.

1912

1912 to 1914

1915 Heyl phone

1915 and 1916

1919

1919 to 1921

1923

1923

1926

1926

1968

1968


From the minutes of the
Town Planning and Development Committee
31st October 1968

1266. COCK CHIMNEY WORKS, BATSWORTH ROAD, MITCHAM

– The Borough Surveyor reported that the Cock Chimney Works, which occupied four detached sites in Batsworth Road and Chapel Road comprising a total area of approximately 1.56 acres, had been offered for sale to the Council. He explained that the works were situated in an area allocated primarily for industrial use in the Initial Development Plan, but which had been re-allocated primarily for residential use in the First Review of the Plan now before the Minister of Housing and Local Government. He reported: —

(i) that the works were within an area at present being studied with a view to environmental improvement and adjoined other property which had been purchased by the Council, or its predecessors. for ultimate redevelopment for residential purposes;

(ii) that, to implement planning objectives in the area, the acquisition of the works had to be firstly considered from a town planning point of view and secondly as a prospective housing site; and

(iii) upon the estimated cost of acquiring other properties in the neighbourhood to form a viable site for residential redevelopment and on the likely housing gain which would be achieved.

Resolved – That the Borough Surveyor be authorised to negotiate terms for the purchase of the Cock Chimney Works and requested to report further to a subsequent meeting.

Source: Minutes of Proceedings of the Council and committees, London Borough of Merton, Volume 5 1968-69, page 806


Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Borough Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Raven’s Spring

Robert Ellis of Elm Lodge bought the White Cottage on Morden Road in 1879 and sank an artesian well behind it. He set up a small factory and offices to sell mineral water from his “Raven’s Spring”. By 1882 the business had grown enough for him to move into larger premises at the “Ravenspring Works” in what is now called Western Road.

Source: page 96 Mitcham Histories: 10 Ravensbury by EN Montague


Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 17 August 1889 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required).

Ellis’s Beanfeast.

—On Saturday last Messrs, Ellis & Co., of the “Ravenspring,” Merton-road, gave their employees, to the number of about 30, their annual outing. Box Hill being the venue, as last year.

A start was made from the Old Nag’s Head about nine a.m. in the firm’s own vans, Mr. Tomlin, of that ilk, having undertaken to provide the “cusine” for the occasion, and himself accompanying the party, which was under the able management Mr. C. Dell.

On reaching Kingswood lunch was partaken of at the Red Lion. From there the journey was continued to Betchworth Clumps, where a halt was made to enable the party to enjoy the beautiful scenery thereabouts, from there on to the Wheatsheaf at Dorking was a most pleasant drive, and after indulging in cricket and various other games until dinner time the company sat down to the capital fare provided by Mr. Tomlin, everything being of the best and prepared the best style. It is needless to say the dinner was thoroughly enjoyed.

The afternoon was spent in various ways, and the party having been photographed en masse they returned to the Wheatsheaf and partook of a substantial tea, Mr. Sellman, the worthy host of that house, endeavouring by all means in his power to add to their enjoyment, and Mr. T, Saywers, of Morden, having joined the party, a most enjoyable time was spent.

After a pleasant drive home they reached the Old Nag’s Head about 10.40 p.m., well satisfied with their outing.

Mr. Ellis accompanied the party, the whole of the expense being borne by the firm.

Reverend Lipshytz

Christlieb Traugott Lipshytz, born in Warsaw, in around 1859. His nationality and naturalisation papers held at the National Archives say he was from Russia.

In 1911, he lived at Gorringe Park House. According to his gravestone, see below, he was director and superintendent missionary since 1889 of the Barbican Mission for the Jews.

Clip from Merton Memories photo 49939 (c) London Borough of Merton

Clip from Merton Memories photo 49939 ‘Barbican Mission To The Jews’ (c) London Borough of Merton

Will:

LIPSHYTZ the reverend Christlieb Traugott of Gorringe Park House Mitcham Surrey Clark died 6 November 1922. Probate London 9 December to Henry Charles Hogan and Herbert Thomas Hogan journalists. Effects £4905 17s.

(Adjusted for inflation, £4905 17s. is about £220,000 in 2017 values.)

Auction:

WEDNESDAY NEXT.

6, MITCHAM PARK.

LEONARD DAVEY & HART Have been instructed by Mrs. Lipshytz to Sell by Auction WEDNESDAY NEXT, MAY 12th, at Two.

FURNITURE AND EFFECTS, comprising bedsteads and bedding, wardrobes, dressing chests, washstands, carpets, dining room suites, bookcases, and tables, harmonium, couches, easy and other chairs, hall stand, gas fires, books, china, glass etc. On view previous AFTERNOON and morning of sale. Catalogues at Auction Offices, Upper Green. Mitcham and 351, London Road, Thornton Heath.

Source: Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 08 May 1926 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

Gravestone in parish burial ground, Church Road

Lavender Grove in Westfields

The road called Lavender Grove, off of Lavender Avenue and parallel with Mortimer Road, was built in the 1930s. Possibly named from a group of nearby cottages that were situated near what is now the junction of Steers Mead.

1952 OS Map

1952 OS Map

Lavender Grove in the ‘west fields’, was referred to in a newspaper story about a fire in 1889. The actual location is uncertain, but the article refers to the water supply for the fire brigade to be too far away in Merton Lane (later Western Road).

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 17 August 1889 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

Fire at Westfields.

The Volunteer Fire Brigade received call on Monday night 11.50 to a fire at Westfields. The men were mustered and the steamer taken to the spot in a very few minutes, when it was found that two cottages in the occupation of Mr. Simmons, jun., florist, namely, 3 and 4, Rosemary-cottages, Lavender-grove, and used by him for the storage of herbs, were well alight.

The nearest fire plug being over 400 yards distant in Merton-lane, the brigade had not sufficient hose to reach the burning cottages, and a mounted patrol was dispatched for the Merton Brigade, which arrived shortly afterwards.

By this time, however, the fire had obtained a good hold, the efforts of the firemen were directed principally to the surrounding property. By about 3 a.m. the flames were extinguished, the result being that the two cottages were gutted the contents destroyed.

It is understood that the property is fully insured in the Phoenix Office. The cause of the fire is unknown.


An 1865 birth certificate has Lavender Grove as the address of Louis James Block.

1865 birth certificate

1865 birth certificate

Mitcham Brewery

Edgar and John Mantell operated the Mitcham Brewery, London Rood, Mitcham, Surrey, until 1877 when it was taken over by John Dalton Mantell, followed by Thunder & Little in 1884. Thunder & Little Ltd was registered in September 1895 as a limited liability company to acquire the business. The company acquired Edward Boniface, Cheam Brewery, Cheam Surrey, in 1898 and changed its name to Mitcham & Cheam Brewery Co Ltd. It was taken over by Page & Overton’s Brewery Ltd, Croydon, Surrey, in 1917. The Cheam Brewery closed in that year and the Mitcham Brewery ceased brewing in 1914.

Source: The Brewing Industry: A Guide to Historical Records edited by Lesley Richmond. Published by Manchester University Press (6 Sept. 1990). ISBN-10: 0719030323

Francis Thunder is shown in the 1900 electoral registers.


Merton Memories Photos
1882 White Hart pub showing JD Mantell name

This sketch from around 1885, when zoomed in to the White Hart pub, the brewery ‘Thunder & Little’ can be seen.
1885 cricket on the green1950s

c. 1975

Maps
1866
1888
1894
1913
1932
1938
1953

News Articles

1898 Mitcham and Cheam Brewery formed to takeover Thunder and Little

18981213 Mitcham and Cheam Brewery

London Standard – Tuesday 13 December 1898

The Mitcham and Cheam Brewery Company (Limited) is formed to take over and combine the businesses of Thunder and Little and of Edward Boniface, brewers, the one at Mitcham and the other at Cheam. A Share capital of £50,000 is to be created, in £5 Shares, half of which will be Cumulative Preference Shares, and the whole of it goes to the Vendors, who also accept £40,000 in cash in payment. An issue of £50,000 in Four-and-a-Half per Cent. First Mortgage Debenture Stock is offered to the public at par in multiples of £10.


News Articles

A subscription is required to view these articles on the British Newspaper Archives website.

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 20 July 1889

Messrs. Thunder and Little’s Beanfeast.

— On Saturday last about 40 of the employees of the Mitcham Brewery assembled at 7 a.m., and after partaking of what they chose in the way of liquid refreshment, proceeded to Mitcham Junction, whence they travelled by special train to Portsmouth, arriving there about 11.45. After a hearty lunch at Maybour’s Restaurant at Portsea the dockyards were visited. A steam yacht was then chartered, and the party went for a two and a half hours’ trip skirting the Isle of Wight. Returning to Maybour’s they sat down to most excellent dinner, the expense of which, indeed was the whole of the outing, being borne by the firm. “The first-class spread” having been done ample justice to, toasts, songs, etc., followed until time for the return journey at 7p.m. Arriving at Mitcham Junction in good time, the company adjourned to the White Hart Hotel, and there brought most enjoyable day of pleasure to a harmonious finish.


Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 01 November 1879

Extensive Embezzlement.

—At the Croydon Petty Sessions on Saturday last, Frederick French, of Aberdeen-terrace, Mitcham, was charged, on remand, with embezzling 18s. 6d., the moneys of his employer, Mr. J. D. Mantell, brewer, of Mitcham.

—The defendant pleaded guilty, and said he hoped the Bench would be lenient with him on account of his wife and family.

— Mr. Dennis, who represented the prosecutor, said the defendant should have thought of his wife and family before. It unfortunately happened that this was only one amount of prisoner’s defalcations out of between £30 and £40.—The Bench sent prisoner to gaol for four calendar months.