Tag Archives: 1889

1889 : A New Cemetery

From the Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 18 May 1889 via the British Newspaper Archive.

A NEW CEMETERY AT
MITCHAM.
REMARKABLE UNANIMITY.

A special meeting of the Croydon Union Raral Sanitary Authority was held the Vestry Hall, Mitcham, Saturday last, for the purpose considering the report of the Clerk (Mr. Harry List) and the Surveyor (Mr. H. Chart), on the subject of inquiry recently held the Home Office to the proposed laying-out a cemetery in Tamworth-lane, Mitcham. Mr. W. J. Lamb presided, and the other members present were Messrs. O. W. Berry, Holloway, Keigwin, F. Tomlin, Webster, Brough Maltby, Rev. K, A. Boyle, and Mr. G. P. Bidder, Q.C. (ex-officio).

Messrs. List and Chart reported as follows: —In accordance with your instructions we attended on Saturday last the inquiry held here by Dr. Hoffman, the Medical Officer of the Burials Acts Department of the Home Office, with reference to the proposal establish a proprietary cemetery at Tamworth-iane, Mitcham Common, and we beg to report to you as follows :— ” That Mr. Ough, C.E., of Austin Friars, London, attended the inquiry and stated that he represented the promoters of a cemetery company, who proposed, if the consent of the Home Office were given, to establish at land now in the occupation of Mr. Bremerkamp, situate at Tamworth-lane, Mitcham, a proprietary cemetery in extent about 80 acres, with the view of meeting the burial requirements of South London and the districts around it. It was proposed to lay-out the grounds in an ornamental manner, with entrances from Greyhound-lane, near Streatham Common, and from Tamworth-lane, near Mitcham Common, the former being probably the principal or more used. The soil was described a loamy clay, and it is proposed drain the surface water into the watercourse passing through the property, and which, after traversing the East Fields and Figg’s Marsh, Mitcham, discharges into the River Graveney at Tooting Bridge, and from there to the Wandle; and it was promised to drain the graves into deep drains discharging into a tank to constructed for the purpose, from whence it would be pumped through a filter either into the sewers of the Sanitary Authority, with their permission, or, if such permission is withheld, on to an irrigation of about three acres prepared for the purpose, from whence it would gravitate into the watercourse before mentioned. Of these alternative proposals for dealing with the deeper drainage the former would be preferred, in which case the promoters would be prepared to compensate the Authority either the payment a lump sura or way of rental for the use of the sewers and fur dealing with the sewage. Mr. Ough laid before the Inspector a plan of the land and proposed works for dealing with the sewage, and at the same time produced and read a report made by M. Mausergh, the eminent sanitary engineer of Westminster, on a proposal to deal with the drainage of a cemetery in the manner now suggested. We then pressed upon the Inspector the fact that as no information with regard to the proposal was yet in possession of the Authority, they were unable to form an opinion as to whether or not it would be desirable in the interests of the district to oppose the proposal, and suggested that the inquiry should be adjourned to give you the opportunity of considering the proposal. Dr. Hoffman consented this suggestion, promising that if the Authority, or the parish of Mitcham, desired to oppose he would continue the inquiry on hearing to that effect, and if the Authority desired to propose any conditions with the view of ensuring the proper use of the works for purifying the subsoil water, such conditions should receive his mast careful consideration, and if reasonable, he would recommend—in the event of the site being sanctioned —that such stipulations should made should ensure the fulfilment of the requirements the Authority. We then asked that copies of the plans of M. Mausergh’s report, which had been produced, might be furnished us for the information of the Authority.”

A long discussion ensued on the consideration of the report, Mr. Bidder taking a prominent part.

It seemed to the general feeling that cemetery would an improvement to that particular part of Mitcham, and that it would open up the roads and stimulate building operations in the vicinity.

It was also mentioned that the objections which were urged against the site were not necessary in this cose, because the Morden site was below the flood level. In this site there would be no difficulty draining into the Authority’s sewers, as the promoters did not anticipate that the drainage would amount to more than 8,000 gallons a day, and the Authority’s sewers could take that additional amount without any difficulty. It was also stated that Messrs. Watney and all the adjoining owners were in favour of the scheme, or at any rate had no idea of opposing it, and there was not the slightest opposition at the inquiry.

After some further discussion, The Chairman moved that the Authority are not disposed to oppose the establishment of the proposed cemetery at Tamworth-lane, Mitcham, provided that in the event of the Home Office sanctioning the site for the purpose of a cemetery, the Home Office be requested to place all the sanitary arrangements of the proposed cemetery under the control of the Rural Sanitary Authority; and that failing an arrangement being come to to drain into the Authority’s sewers, it be required that a filtration area of not less than six acres provided.

Mr. Bidder seconded the motion, which was carried unanimously.

It was also decided that the Clerk should send a copy of the resolution to Dr. Hoffman, and that his attention should be called to the fact that in the Golden Green scheme, referred to by the promoters, a filtration area of three acres was considered necessary for cemetery of 30 acres in extent.

1889 : Mr Bidder and Surrey County Council

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 05 January 1889

MR. BIDDER AT MITCHAM

On Friday evening in last week a meeting convened by the Colliers Wood, Singlegate, and District Ratepayers’ Association was held at the Singlegate Board School, Merton-lane, when Mr. G. P. Bidder, Q.C., delivered an address on the new County Council. Mr. Gibson was voted to the chair, and there were also present the platform Mr. G. P. Bidder, Mr. C. Dungate, and Mr. F. D. Sandell.

Among those present in the body the room were Messrs. C. Doughty, W. Clark. K. Fleming. S. Leonard, C. Elliott, C. Combes, W. H. Talbot, T. Allen, and G. PedwelL.

The Chairman having briefly opened the meeting, Mr. Sandell read letters of regret stating inability to attend from Messrs. W. P. Brown, F. S. Lcgg, Billing, and Thomson.

Mr. Bidder, on rising, said he felt great satisfaction in the invitation from the Ratepayers’ Association to attend a meeting of the electors who resided in that part the parish. and should not have come forward as a candidate it had not been for that invitation and request from several others whom he looked upon his best supporters. It had been said that was busy man and would not have time to attend the duties of county councillor, but that point was fully discussed at the Vestry Hall in week. He said if elected as councillor would do his best in that position. Referring to the Act, Mr. Bidder said there was no doubt it was the commencement new era, which it was difficult overrate ; in short, it was to transfer all the administrative and financial business of the county hitherto done by the justices at Quarter Sessions to the County Council. One the most important features in the new Bill was the representative principle wherein those who paid the county rates would in future have voice in the election the representatives. It was nothing whatever with politics. One thing necessary for a councillor was that he should have a certain knowledge of the neighbourhood represented. There was such a thing as having too local government, and he pointed out the fact that vestries were not the best kind of local government. With regard Mitcham, he did not think they had been fairly treated, for they ought have had two representatives, and he had tried for it, but was too late. Whoever was elected on the Council ought to make it his business to get that altered. It would be the duly of the councillors to be always on the lookout and keep their district in touch with the governing body. There were many authorities which now overlapped each other, for instance Boards of Guardians, Rural Sanitary Authorities, &c., and all these would be reorganised, so to speak, and subordinate to the County Council. Singlegate was a little on one side of Mitcham, and he did not know whether any of the justices knew the wants of that particular locality. There was no doubt it had suffered a great deal through inattention. Lunatic asylums, industrial schools, reformatories, county buildings, roads, bridges, &c., would come under the Council, also the granting of music and dancing licenses, and the administration of the Contagious Diseases (Animals) Act. The police would be under a joint committee of the Council and County Justices, and the appointment of medical officers would be done by the Council. Where the local authorities did not exercise their proper functions the Council would report them to the Local Government Board. The local authorities in many small places were not strong enough to overcome individual interests, and it was essential that they should have a body who could do so. The Rivers Pollution Act had been almost a dead letter, and nobody knew what had been put in the Wandle at different times, but this the Council would have power to deal with. Bills were often brought into Parliament which interfered with the public rights and were prejudicial to the county, and the Council would have power to oppose them. People had said that he did not take any interest in local affairs. He would just remind them that seven or eight years ago the London, Brighton, and Coast Railway Company wanted to straighten their line at Mitcham Junction, and for which they would lave required some 20 or 30 acres of the Common, when he with other gentlemen opposed the Bill, and it was thrown out. Several efforts had been made to take away water from the Wandle and the South-West Spring Water Compony wanted to take it to Lambeth. Then there was Croydon, with whom they had had three or four fights, and fortunately succeeded in them; and, lastly, Sutton, and they had also stopped them. Some other duties of the Council would be to arrange the electoral divisions and levy county and police rates. The County Councils altogether would receive a grant of £3,000,000 for the local taxation, which was very important, as Mitcham were about 7s. 9d. to 8s. in the £ for the year. They would have the issuing of Stock, which would materially decrease the rate of interest for their loans by something considerable, seeing that the county debt of Surrey was at present about £300,000. In conclusion, Mr, Bidder said he had not asked for a single vote, but if they thought he was the best man for the post they should elect him, and if not they should elect someone else.

Mr. John Bull, who said spoke on behalf of the working class, then put the following questions :

1. Was Mr. Bidder in favour of the parish lamps being kept alight all night, and also foggy nights?

2. The taking over of roads which ore partly occupied, and are not in sanitary condition, for instance Palestine-road?

3. That the River Wandle be protected where it was very dangerous, both for foot passengers and vehicles?

4. The appropriation of public places for public meetings.

5. That gas and water companies be under the control of the local authorities?

6. The establishment of a free library in Mitcham, where papers and books of all sections should be allowed free circulation?

7. That public meetings be held in open spaces provided they do not interfere with business traffic?

Mr. Bidder said he entirely agreed with all these suggestions, subject to each question being taken in a broad and comprehensive view.

Mr. F. D. Sandell then moved That Mr. G. P. Bidder is a fit and proper person to represent the parish of Mitcham on the Surrey County Council.”

Mr. W. H. Talbot seconded the motion.

Mr. Dungate supported, and said with all due respect to Mr. Harwood, who was the waywarden, there were some roads which were disgraceful. The lighting question he had often called attention to (cries of “Shame”)—but they had not yet got the lamps alight every night, and as to the stinking ditch in the Merton-road the Inspector to the Local Government Board had said it was necessary that it should be covered in. He (Mr. Dungate) had 60 feet frontage to that ditch, which he did not think was a great deal.

Mr. T. Allen, who said he had been a ratepayer for 42 years, said they were complaining of the high rates, and yet they wanted all these improvements. The ditch in question would cost £2,000 to cover in.

Mr. Dungate said it was quite true that an offer was made by the local authorities some time ago to pay half the expense of covering the ditch, but when they estimated it at twice the price for which it could be done for one should not fall in with their views.

Mr. Clark said Mr. Allen had assured him that it could be done for 15s. per foot. The resolution was then put and carried nem. con., and a vote thanks having been accorded to the chairman and Mr. Bidder the meeting closed.

1889 : Flooding at the Fountain

ANOTHER FLOOD.

Messrs. Oehme, Summerhays & Co., solicitors, wrote stating that Mr. Peter Dale, of the Fountain, Mitcham, had consulted them with reference to the over flowing of the Board’s sewer into their client’s cellars. They understood that the flooding had occurred several occasions and that the attention the Authority’s surveyor had been drawn the fact on more than one occasion, but steps had been taken until October last prevent a recurrence. Mr. Dale estimated that had sustained damage amounting for loss of beer and cost cleansing, in addition to which and his family had suffered severely from inconvenience. It was hoped that the Authority would make some adequate compensation.

The Surveyor said the flooding took place over six months ago.

The Chairman — Then they are debarred from making a claim upon us.

Mr. Philpott said in addition that the flooding was due the excessive rainfall, over which the Authority had control.

The Surveyor said that was not all. The drain was constructed without the consent of the Authority, and stated the time that it would be liable to overflow. He had had an interview with Messrs. Crowley, the brewers, about the matter some time ago, he had no difficulty in convincing them that the tenant was in the wrong.

It was decided to reply that the Authority could not recognise any claim.

Source: Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 16 March 1889 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

Graham Avenue

Road off east side of Streatham Road, north of Graham Road.

1894-os-map-graham-avenue

Built in the late 19th century on land previously occupied by The Willows, described by Eric Montague in his book Mitcham Histories : 2 North Mitcham, page 74, as having

extensive stabling, farmery, meadows and gardens

. The roads Graham Road, Elmfield Avenue and Fernlea Road were also built in this land. The address “Graham Avenue, Willows Estate” was used in this auction ad from 1889:

Almost without reserve. Tooting Junction. Within a few minutes of the railway station and easy distance of Mitcham Junction, from whence there is an excellent service of trains to London Bridge, Ludgate Hill, or Victoria. For Occupation or Investment.

Messrs. FURZE ALDRIDGE Will Sell by Auction at the Mart, Tokenhouse Yard, E.C.. Tuesday, June 4th, Twelve for One o’clock, THE DETACHED FREEHOLD RESIDENCES situate and being Nos. 43 and 75, Graham Avenue, Willows Estate, Mitcham, near Tooting Junction, detached, double-fronted, and most conveniently planned on two floors only ; they occupy a choice position and are close to shops, &c. contain on first floor four bedrooms, bath room (hot and cold) water, w.c.; the ground floor dining room and elegant drawing room, 26-ft. long, large kitchen and scullery, and other domestic conveniences ; large garden front and rear; wide sideway. At present in hand, but of the estimated rental value of £50 per annum each. May be viewed by order of the Auctioneers. Particulars and conditions of sale obtained of Messrs. Heather Sons, Solicitors, 17, Paternoster Row, E.C.; and of the Auctioneers their Offices, Railway Bridge, High-road, Streatham, at Norwood Junction and Thornton Heath.

Source: Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 01 June 1889 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)


The 1915 street directory lists the occupants in the order encountered when walking from Figgs Marsh to Fernlea Road. The house names are in brackets.

SOUTH SIDE

from Figg’s marsh

Mrs Munday (Russellton)
Mrs Page (Glenfield)
Frederick George Taylor (Roseneath)
Clemence William Benger (Woodbine)
Alfred Shott (Edgemont)
William Court (Wardown)
Allan Reed (Woodside)

NORTH SIDE

William Frederick Wontner (Fairlawn)
James Henry Ellis (Melita)
Walter Wilson (Elm cottage)
Miss Marlow (Shirley)
John Gray (Homeland)
George Arthur Cramp (Mayville)
Miss Hunt (Oakdene)
Charles Kendall (Stoneleigh)
Ernest Charles Newton (Cyril villa)

… here is Elmfield Avenue

Frederick Moon (Lynton)
Frederick Holmesworth (Ashley)
John Newson (Sunnyside)
Thomas Gordon Richards (Cloveley)
Edward Hagon (Primrose)
Percy Babb (Pevensey)


The 1891 street directory:

from Figg’s marsh

NORTH SIDE

Mrs Freeman (Glenfield)
F.G. Taylor (Roseneath)

SOUTH SIDE

Charles Frderick Woodward (The Elms)
Mrs Noble (Fairlawn)

World War 1 Connections
Private Ernest Newsom

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

1889 Dog stolen from landlord of the Bath Tavern

MITCHAM.

Strange Proceedings.

—At the Town Hall, Croydon, on Saturday, Charles Dawson, was charged with wilfully breaking the gate and entering the yard the rear of the Bath Tavern, Belgrave-road, Mitcham, and with stealing therefrom a lurcher bitch and dog collar on Jan. 17th, valued at £1, the property of Joseph Gilbert, the landlord.

—Prosecutor said defendant had been a customer of his. The dog was loose in his garden on the 17th. and gone the next morning. The value of the bitch was £1. He knew it originally belonged to defendant. Joseph Omigold said on the night of the 17th he met defendant, who said prosecutor had his dog in his yard, and he meant to get it. He then deliberately pulled down the gate, and went in the yard and fetched the dog out

Defendant: The dog of no value; it is big and good for nothing, like the landlord.

—P-.c. 476 W said he apprehended defendant his home on Friday evening. He said I had known I would not have sent the old woman round with the dog this morning.”

—Defendant was remanded for a week so that some arrangement might be made with the prosecutor to the repair of the gate.

Source: Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 26 January 1889 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

6th May 1899 Mitcham School Board

MITCHAM SCHOOL BOARD

The usual monthly meeting of the School Board for Mitcham was held at the Board-room (Vestry Hall) on Monday evening. The Rev. D.F. Wilson presided, and the other members present were Messrs. F. Tomlin, W. Mears, James Clarke, Jasper Knight, B. Green, J. Brown, and Kemshead.

THE EXAMINATIONS.

From Her Majesty’s Inspector’s report on the recent examination of the Lower Mitcham School it appeared that the boys had passed a very successful examination and that the first standard had passed without single failure. The second was good, and the upper standards just got through. The girls had passed good examination. The arithmetic was less successful, but the grammar, geography, needlework, singing, and musical drill were good, and the tone of the school all that it should be. The infants had also passed a very successful examination. The average attendance at the boys’ school was 197, and the grant earned was £l70 14s. 8d. ; at the girls’ school the average attendance was 57, and the grant earned £59 5s. 6d. ; and at the infants’ school the average attendance was 98, and the grant earned £73 10s.— making total grant of £303 10s. 2d.

In answer to the Chairman the Clerk said the amount of the grant earned at the Lower Mitcham Schools last year was £277 7s. 5d.

The Chairman—Then the examination this year has been very satisfactory.

AN APPLICATION.

Mr. Harber, one of the head-masters, applied for an increase salary. He said his present salary was £145, and considered that his income should be proportionate to the size the school. The letter was referred committee for consideration.

Mr. Hossack, assistant-master at Lower Mitcham Schools, also applied for an increase of salary, and his application was similarly treated.

THE TREASURER’S BALANCE.

The Chairman stated that the balance in the hands of the treasurer was £257 10s. 5d.
The Finance Committee recommended the payment of current accounts amounting £517 Mr. Knight proposed, and Mr. Mears seconded, that the report should adopted.
The Chairman pointed out that they were drawing cheques for £500 and they had only £250 in hand.
The Clerk said the overseers would pay in £250 on Wednesday morning, and that before the week was out the grant on account of the Lower Mitcham Schools would be received.
It was decided to pass the report of the Finance Committee, but to hold over the cheques until there is sufficient cash in the hank to meet them.

ANOTHER LAWYER’S BILL

The Clerk said he had received letter from Messrs. Ward, Mills, and Co., solicitors, enclosing a bill of costs for £37 I3s. 7d. for acting for the trustees on the proposed transfer of the infants’ school at Lower Mitcham. They stated that they were told by Messrs. Gedge to send the bill to the Board. They asked for cheque soon as possible, as the bill had been running for four years. A second letter had been received asking when they might expect the cheque.

The Chairman said it might simplify matters if he stated that Ward, Mills, and Co. were the solicitors to the late Mr. William Simpson, who was the sole surviving trustee of the schools.

Mr. Tomlin said Ward, Mills, and Co. in their letter stated that Messrs. Gedge and Co. informed them that they should charge their account to the School Board. Could the chairman give any information to that and to who instructed Ward, Mills, and Co. to act for the Board. The simple fact of the matter appeared to be that there was nothing on the minutes authorising Ward, Mills, and Co. to act, and whatever the Board had to with Ward, Mills, and Co. had been through Messrs. Gedge. The whole of the negotiations appeared be conspicuous by the failures. The trustees did not know that the school had not been transferred, and it was not an unfair question to ask who had acted all through the piece? So far as he could understand Mr. Gedge and Mr. Wilson, their chairman, were the only two who had had anything to with it, and under those circumstances thought he was right in asking why Mr. Gedge had been allowed not only to act as trustee and solicitor, but also to give instructions as to the payment of the bill of costs of another solicitor. At the last meeting Mr. Legg told the Board that he was not a trustee, and that was simply appointed a trustee pro forma in order to facilitate the transfer of the schools. But the transfer had never taken place, and no sooner had Gedge’s bill been paid than put the other people on the track of the Board. What business had Gedge to refer Ward, Mills, and Co. to the Board, and to state that the Board were responsible? The whole matter required the serious consideration of the Board, and the bill should most decidedly be repudiated. If the schools had been transferred he could understand the account being paid, but the schools had not been transferred, and the Board had never instructed Ward, Mills, and Co. to act for them. If Messrs. Gedge and Co. had done so they should pay the bill. (Hear, hear.)

Mr. Brown said he would like to see the whole of the correspondence produced in connection with this affair from the earliest part, and they should also obtain from Gedge & Co, such information as they could get from them in the shape of correspondence. He wanted to know more about the matter. (Hear, hear.)

Mr. Tomlin said he really thought that after all the trouble the Board had had over Gedge’s account the trustees should take the initiative and something in this matter. That the trustees should have allowed one gentleman take the entire management of the whole thing showed a very bad state of affairs. The Chairman he said was not a trustee of the schools. Mr. Wm. Simpson was the sole surviving trustee, and the former Board instructed Messrs, Gedge & Co, to obtain a transfer of the infant school at Lower Mitcham from Mr. Wm Simpson to the Board. He had been looking through the correspondence, which was quite open for the Board to see, and he found one letter in which Mr. Simpson said would decline to transfer the schools except the advice Messrs. Ward, Mills & Co., his solicitors. He (the chairman) was simply a trustee with the other six gentlemen in order take possession the school and transfer it to the Board. He knew no more about the matter than the other gentlemen. He had the misfortune to be both member of the Board and a trustee, but he really had no information to give, and if he had would not withhold it for single moment. He had privately spoken to the trustees, and their opinion was that the Board wished the school transferred the initiative should come from the Board by proposing some terms. As to the account before them, he thought they should call upon Gedge & Co. to produce the whole of the correspondence.

Mr. Tomlin — We should also ask Gedge & Co. upon what authority they informed Ward, Mills Co. that we are liable. Mr. Clarke said he thought they should discuss the matter then. No business had been done, and yet two accounts had been sent in and one paid. He would like know what the present account was for. The schools had not been transferred, and when they were transferred the Board would called upon to pay similar set costs. Mr. Brows promised that the matter should be adjourned, and that in the meantime the Clerk should obtain from Gedge & Co. full particulars about the account.
Mr. Clarke — We should take no notice of the bill. What is the bill for?
Mr. Brown — We should write a letter ignoring our liability, but ask for further information without prejudice.
Mr. Clarke — Will someone kindly tell me what the account is for.
The Chairman — That is just the information we are anxious obtain. The motion was then carried.

Source: Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 11 May 1889 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

1889 Storm

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 20 July 1889

MITCHAM.
Wednesday’s Storm.

—About 2 p.m. on Wednesday afternoon, during a heavy thunder storm, the electric fluid struck a chimney at the shop of Mr. Hannington, baker, Lower Mitcham, and did considerable damage, destroying an air pipe and igniting the gas. Mr. Hannington was, fortunately, at home, and succeeded in extinguishing it, otherwise more serious damage would have had to be recorded. As it was, mischief was wrought to the extent of nearly £10. A chimney was also slightly struck at a house Golden-terrace, Beddington Corner, in the occupation of Mr. G. Harris, during the same storm, hut the damage in this case was not very serious.