Tag Archives: Bidder

1889 : A New Cemetery

From the Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 18 May 1889 via the British Newspaper Archive.

A NEW CEMETERY AT
MITCHAM.
REMARKABLE UNANIMITY.

A special meeting of the Croydon Union Raral Sanitary Authority was held the Vestry Hall, Mitcham, Saturday last, for the purpose considering the report of the Clerk (Mr. Harry List) and the Surveyor (Mr. H. Chart), on the subject of inquiry recently held the Home Office to the proposed laying-out a cemetery in Tamworth-lane, Mitcham. Mr. W. J. Lamb presided, and the other members present were Messrs. O. W. Berry, Holloway, Keigwin, F. Tomlin, Webster, Brough Maltby, Rev. K, A. Boyle, and Mr. G. P. Bidder, Q.C. (ex-officio).

Messrs. List and Chart reported as follows: —In accordance with your instructions we attended on Saturday last the inquiry held here by Dr. Hoffman, the Medical Officer of the Burials Acts Department of the Home Office, with reference to the proposal establish a proprietary cemetery at Tamworth-iane, Mitcham Common, and we beg to report to you as follows :— ” That Mr. Ough, C.E., of Austin Friars, London, attended the inquiry and stated that he represented the promoters of a cemetery company, who proposed, if the consent of the Home Office were given, to establish at land now in the occupation of Mr. Bremerkamp, situate at Tamworth-lane, Mitcham, a proprietary cemetery in extent about 80 acres, with the view of meeting the burial requirements of South London and the districts around it. It was proposed to lay-out the grounds in an ornamental manner, with entrances from Greyhound-lane, near Streatham Common, and from Tamworth-lane, near Mitcham Common, the former being probably the principal or more used. The soil was described a loamy clay, and it is proposed drain the surface water into the watercourse passing through the property, and which, after traversing the East Fields and Figg’s Marsh, Mitcham, discharges into the River Graveney at Tooting Bridge, and from there to the Wandle; and it was promised to drain the graves into deep drains discharging into a tank to constructed for the purpose, from whence it would be pumped through a filter either into the sewers of the Sanitary Authority, with their permission, or, if such permission is withheld, on to an irrigation of about three acres prepared for the purpose, from whence it would gravitate into the watercourse before mentioned. Of these alternative proposals for dealing with the deeper drainage the former would be preferred, in which case the promoters would be prepared to compensate the Authority either the payment a lump sura or way of rental for the use of the sewers and fur dealing with the sewage. Mr. Ough laid before the Inspector a plan of the land and proposed works for dealing with the sewage, and at the same time produced and read a report made by M. Mausergh, the eminent sanitary engineer of Westminster, on a proposal to deal with the drainage of a cemetery in the manner now suggested. We then pressed upon the Inspector the fact that as no information with regard to the proposal was yet in possession of the Authority, they were unable to form an opinion as to whether or not it would be desirable in the interests of the district to oppose the proposal, and suggested that the inquiry should be adjourned to give you the opportunity of considering the proposal. Dr. Hoffman consented this suggestion, promising that if the Authority, or the parish of Mitcham, desired to oppose he would continue the inquiry on hearing to that effect, and if the Authority desired to propose any conditions with the view of ensuring the proper use of the works for purifying the subsoil water, such conditions should receive his mast careful consideration, and if reasonable, he would recommend—in the event of the site being sanctioned —that such stipulations should made should ensure the fulfilment of the requirements the Authority. We then asked that copies of the plans of M. Mausergh’s report, which had been produced, might be furnished us for the information of the Authority.”

A long discussion ensued on the consideration of the report, Mr. Bidder taking a prominent part.

It seemed to the general feeling that cemetery would an improvement to that particular part of Mitcham, and that it would open up the roads and stimulate building operations in the vicinity.

It was also mentioned that the objections which were urged against the site were not necessary in this cose, because the Morden site was below the flood level. In this site there would be no difficulty draining into the Authority’s sewers, as the promoters did not anticipate that the drainage would amount to more than 8,000 gallons a day, and the Authority’s sewers could take that additional amount without any difficulty. It was also stated that Messrs. Watney and all the adjoining owners were in favour of the scheme, or at any rate had no idea of opposing it, and there was not the slightest opposition at the inquiry.

After some further discussion, The Chairman moved that the Authority are not disposed to oppose the establishment of the proposed cemetery at Tamworth-lane, Mitcham, provided that in the event of the Home Office sanctioning the site for the purpose of a cemetery, the Home Office be requested to place all the sanitary arrangements of the proposed cemetery under the control of the Rural Sanitary Authority; and that failing an arrangement being come to to drain into the Authority’s sewers, it be required that a filtration area of not less than six acres provided.

Mr. Bidder seconded the motion, which was carried unanimously.

It was also decided that the Clerk should send a copy of the resolution to Dr. Hoffman, and that his attention should be called to the fact that in the Golden Green scheme, referred to by the promoters, a filtration area of three acres was considered necessary for cemetery of 30 acres in extent.

In 1927 a Saxon relic was sent to Mitcham Australia

From Norwood News – Saturday 18th June 1927, via the British Newspaper Archives.

MITCHAM, AUSTRALIA.
SCHOOLMISTRESS TO CONVEY GREETINGS.

The Mitcham school managers met on Monday night under the chairmanship of Ald. A. Mizen. It was reported that Miss A. D. Milne, mistress at Gorringe Park School, was visiting Australia, and the managers decided to ask her to convey a signed letter from them of cordial greetings from Mitcham, England, to Mitcham, Australia. The letter recalled that a flag was sent from Mitcham, Australia, to Mitcham, England, some years ago, and that more recently Mrs. Howard visited them in England, and conveyed fraternal greetings from Mitcham, Australia.

The chairman mentioned that Colonel Harold Bidder was sending to Mitcham, Australia, a relic from the Saxon burial grounds of Mitcham, England.

1889 : Mr Bidder and Surrey County Council

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 05 January 1889

MR. BIDDER AT MITCHAM

On Friday evening in last week a meeting ocnvened by the Colliers Wood, Singlegate, and District Ratepayers’ Association was held at the Singlegate Board School, Merton-lane. when Mr. G. P. Bidder, Q.C., delivered an address on the new County Council. Mr. Gibson was voted to the chair, and there were also present the platform Mr. G. P. Bidder, Mr. C. Dungate, and Mr. F. D. Sandell.

Among those present in the body the room were Messrs. C. Doughty, W. Clark. K. Fleming. S. Leonard, C. Elliott, C. Combes, W. H. Talbot, T. Allen, and G. PedwelL.

The Chairman having briefly opened the meeting, Mr. Sandell read letters of regret stating inability to attend from Messrs. W. P. Brown, F. S. Lcgg, Billing, and Thomson.

Mr. Bidder, on rising, said he felt great satisfaction in the invitation from the Ratepayers’ Association to attend a meeting of the electors who resided in that part the parish. and should not have come forward as a candidate it had not been for that invitation and request from several others whom he looked upon his best supporters. It had been said that was busy man and would not have time to attend the duties of county councillor, but that point was fully discussed at the Vestry Hall in week. He said if elected as councillor would do his best in that position. Referring to the Act, Mr. Bidder said there was no doubt it was the commencement new era, which it was difficult overrate ; in short, it was to transfer all the administrative and financial business of the county hitherto done by the justices at Quarter Sessions to the County Council. One the most important features in the new Bill was the representative principle wherein those who paid the county rates would in future have voice in the election the representatives. It was nothing whatever with politics. One thing necessary for a councillor was that he should have a certain knowledge of the neighbourhood represented. There was such a thing as having too local government, and he pointed out the fact that vestries were not the best kind of local government. With regard Mitcham, he did not think they had been fairly treated, for they ought have had two representatives, and he had tried for it, but was too late. Whoever was elected on the Council ought to make it his business to get that altered. It would be the duly of the councillors to be always on the lookout and keep their district in touch with the governing body. There were many authorities which now overlapped each other, for instance Boards of Guardians, Rural Sanitary Authorities, &c., and all these would be reorganised, so to speak, and subordinate to the County Council. Singlegate was a little on one side of Mitcham, and he did not know whether any of the justices knew the wants of that particular locality. There was no doubt it had suffered a great deal through inattention. Lunatic asylums, industrial schools, reformatories, county buildings, roads, bridges, &c., would come under the Council, also the granting of music and dancing licenses, and the administration of the Contagious Diseases (Animals) Act. The police would be under a joint committee of the Council and County Justices, and the appointment of medical officers would be done by the Council. Where the local authorities did not exercise their proper functions the Council would report them to the Local Government Board. The local authorities in many small places were not strong enough to overcome individual interests, and it was essential that they should have a body who could do so. The Rivers Pollution Act had been almost a dead letter, and nobody knew what had been put in the Wandle at different times, but this the Council would have power to deal with. Bills were often brought into Parliament which interfered with the public rights and were prejudicial to the county, and the Council would have power to oppose them. People had said that he did not take any interest in local affairs. He would just remind them that seven or eight years ago the London, Brighton, and Coast Railway Company wanted to straighten their line at Mitcham Junction, and for which they would lave required some 20 or 30 acres of the Common, when he with other gentlemen opposed the Bill, and it was thrown out. Several efforts had been made to take away water from the Wandle and the South-West Spring Water Compony wanted to take it to Lambeth. Then there was Croydon, with whom they had had three or four fights, and fortunately succeeded in them; and, lastly, Sutton, and they had also stopped them. Some other duties of the Council would be to arrange the electoral divisions and levy county and police rates. The County Councils altogether would receive a grant of £3,000,000 for the local taxation, which was very important, as Mitcham were about 7s. 9d. to 8s. in the £ for the year. They would have the issuing of Stock, which would materially decrease the rate of interest for their loans by something considerable, seeing that the county debt of Surrey was at present about £300,000. In conclusion, Mr, Bidder said he had not asked for a single vote, but if they thought he was the best man for the post they should elect him, and if not they should elect someone else.

Mr. John Bull, who said spoke on behalf of the working class, then put the following questions :

1. Was Mr. Bidder in favour of the parish lamps being kept alight all night, and also foggy nights?

2. The taking over of roads which ore partly occupied, and are not in sanitary condition, for instance Palestine-road?

3. That the River Wandle be protected where it was very dangerous, both for foot passengers and vehicles?

4. The appropriation of public places for public meetings.

5. That gas and water companies be under the control of the local authorities?

6. The establishment of a free library in Mitcham, where papers and books of all sections should be allowed free circulation?

7. That public meetings be held in open spaces provided they do not interfere with business traffic?

Mr. Bidder said he entirely agreed with all these suggestions, subject to each question being taken in a broad and comprehensive view.

Mr. F. D. Sandell then moved That Mr. G. P. Bidder is a fit and proper person to represent the parish of Mitcham on the Surrey County Council.”

Mr. W. H. Talbot seconded the motion.

Mr. Dungate supported, and said with all due respect to Mr. Harwood, who was the waywarden, there were some roads which were disgraceful. The lighting question he had often called attention to (cries of “Shame”)—but they had not yet got the lamps alight every night, and as to the stinking ditch in the Merton-road the Inspector to the Local Government Board had said it was necessary that it should be covered in. He (Mr. Dungate) had 60 feet frontage to that ditch, which he did not think was a great deal.

Mr. T. Allen, who said he had been a ratepayer for 42 years, said they were complaining of the high rates, and yet they wanted all these improvements. The ditch in question would cost £2,000 to cover in.

Mr. Dungate said it was quite true that an offer was made by the local authorities some time ago to pay half the expense of covering the ditch, but when they estimated it at twice the price for which it could be done for one should not fall in with their views.

Mr. Clark said Mr. Allen had assured him that it could be done for 15s. per foot. The resolution was then put and carried nem. con., and a vote thanks having been accorded to the chairman and Mr. Bidder the meeting closed.

Harold Francis Bidder D.S.O.

Lt. Col. Harold Francis Bidder, D.S.O. (1917), M.A., F.S.A.

Second son of George P. Bidder, Q.C., of Ravensbury Park, Mitcham.
Born 1875; educated St. Paul’s and Trinity College Cambridge.
Married in 1918 to Vivian, eldest daughter of late H. M. Rush, of
Edinburgh; 2 sons, 1 daughter.

Barrister at Lincoln’s Inn 1899.

Joined 9th Battalion, Royal Sussex regiment in 1899, and served in South African War 1899-1902 and in Great War 1914-19 in France.
Lt. Col. Machine Gun corps 1917

Associate member of Chartered Surveyors’ Institute,
J.P. (1926) Surrey.

1 Brick court, Temple, E.C.4 (Central 1687) ;
The Malt House, Nettlebed, Henley-on-Thames, Oxon (Nettlebed 260).

Source: Kelly’s Handbook to the Titled, Landed & Official Classes, 1952 from Find My Past (subscription required)

According to Eric Montague in his book Mitcham Histories : 10 Ravensbury, pages 42-3, among his interests was archaeology, and he started the excavation of the Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Ravensbury in 1891. He continued with this after WW1 and finished it in 1922.

He became the first president of the Merton and Morden Historical Society when it was formed in 1951, a position he held for 20 years until his death at the age of 92.

Coats of Arms

This is list of people who either came from Mitcham or had some connection to it, and had their own coat of arms.

Descriptions are from the Surrey History Centre, Surrey Coat of Arms.

BIDDER
BRERETON
CAESAR
CRANMER
ELLINGWORTH
FARRANT
FENTON
FITZWILLIAM
GREENE
HARRINGTON
HEATH
HELLARD
HUNTINGTON
HYGHLORD
ILLINGWORTH
MALLABY-DEELEY
OAKES
PONTIFEX
ROBINSON
ROTLAND
RUTLAND [ROUTHLAND]
RUTLAND
SHERMAN
SIMPSON
SMITH
STANLEY
STAPLES
THOMSON
THOROLD
WATNEY
WORSFOLD


BIDDER

George Parker Bidder, JP, QC, MA (Cantab), of Ravensbury Park, Mitcham, bencher and barrister-at-law, Lincoln’s Inn, (1836-96), was father of Lieutenant-Colonel Harold Francis Bidder, DSO, JP, MA (Cantab), FSA, of Ravensbury Manor, Mitcham, (b.1875), who had issue George Parker Bidder, (b.1920), and Alan Mortimer McClean Bidder, (b.1921).

Arms: Chequy Argent and Azure on a chief Sable a four-winged thunderbolt Or between two horseshoes of the first.

Crest: A sinister arm embowed vested Azure cuffed and charged on the sleeve with a saltire Argent the hand holding a scroll Proper.

Motto: Ne tentes aut perfice. (FD7)


BRERETON

of Mitcham.
Arms: Argent two bars Sable, a crescent for difference.
Crest: A bear head erased Sable muzzled Or, charged with a crescent for difference.
As borne (SV1623) by Theophilus Brereton, (d.Dec 5, 1638), of Mitcham, son of Richard Brereton, 2nd son of Thomas Brereton of Henley-in-Arden, Warwickshire, 2nd son of Sir Randall Brereton of Malpas, Cheshire.


CAESAR

Sir Julius Caesar, Master of the Rolls, (1558-1636), acquired property at Mitcham by marriage, 1582, to Dorcas, widow of Richard Lusher, and daughter of Sir Richard Martin, Alderman of London and Master of the Mint, and entertained Queen Elizabeth I there 1598.
(DNB, VCHS iv 229)
Arms: Gules three roses Argent on a chief of the second as many roses of the first.
Crest: A dolphin embowed Proper in the sea Vert. (BGA)


CRANMER

Robert Cranmer, (d.1665), bought Mitcham Canons 1656. It descended in the family until the death, spm. 1801, of James
Cranmer; his daughter Esther Maria married Captain Richard Dixon, 85th Regiment, who assumed the name and arms of Cranmer.
Arms: Argent on a chevron Purpure between three pelicans Azure as many cinquefoils Or. (VCHS iv 231)
See also SIMPSON.


ELLINGWORTH

of Mitcham.
Arms: Argent a fess flory counterflory between three escallops Sable. (BGA)


FARRANT

of Mitcham.
Arms: Argent on a chief Gules two crosses patonce Vair, a crescent for difference.
Crest: A cubit arm erect vested Vair cuffed Argent, the hand Proper holding a battle-axe in bend sinister of the second, the sleeve
charged with a crescent for difference.
As borne (SV1623) by Richard Farrant of Mitcham, son of William Farrant, DCL


FENTON

Fairbairn records Ferrar Fenton, FRAS, FCAA of 8 King’s Road, Mitcham, as using for
Crest: Out of a ducal coronet an arm embowed in armour Or holding in the hand a sword Argent hilted of the first.
Motto: Mon hieur viendra. (FBC)


FITZWILLIAM

of Mitcham.

Arms: Lozengy Argent and Gules.
Crest: Out of a ducal coronet Or a triple plume of ostrich feathers Argent.
From the brass in Tooting Graveney Church to William FitzWilliam, (d.Jul 17, 1597), of Mitcham, and his wife, Elizabeth, (d.1582), daughter of .. Harrington. (SAC xxxiii 12)


GREENE

of Mitcham.

Baronet, Nov. 2, 1664. Extinct 1671.
Arms: Per pale Azure and Sable three bucks trippant Or.
Crest: A buck head couped Argent attired Or gorged with a coronet per pale Azure and Sable.
Granted by Bysshe, Clarenceux, to William Greene, Jan 6, 1663. (SAC iii 350)


HARRINGTON

The arms of Harrington are impaled by FitzWilliam, on a monument in Tooting Graveney Church; William FitzWilliam, of Mitcham, (d.1597), married Elizabeth, (d.1582), widow of William Dymoke, (d.1549), and daughter of Sir John Harrington * of Exton, Rutland, (d.1553).
Arms: Sable a fret Argent.
Crest: A lion’s head erased Or collared Gules buckled Gold.
* (VCHS iv 104) records [Sir] James Harrington, presumably Sir John’s son, as buying the manor of Tooting Graveney from Sir Edward Dymoke, 1593, and selling it, 1595, to Sir Henry Maynard.


HEATH

of Limpsfield.
Arms: Argent a cross raguly between twelve billets Gules.
As borne in 1623 by Robert Heath of Dartford, Kent, and Sir Robert Heath of Mitcham, grandsons of Robert Heath of Limpsfield, son of John Heath of Limpsfield. (MB ii 395) *
* Burke records the following for Heath of Brasted, Kent, and of Lyndsfield, (sic) and Tandridge.
Arms: Argent a cross engrailed between twelve billets Gules.
Crest: A wolf’s head erased per pale Sable and Or ducally gorged Argent holding in the mouth a broken spear of the second headed of the third. (BGA)


HELLARD

of Mitcham, also of Cornwall.
Arms: Sable a bend flory Argent. (BGA)


HUNTINGTON

David Charles Huntington of Oaktree Cottage, Wormley, (b.1938), elder son of Lieutenant-Colonel Arthur Charles Huntington, MVO, Grenadier Guards, (1908-44), and descended from James Huntington of Mitcham, (1801-81).
Arms: Or on a pale between two roses Gules barbed and seeded Proper a lion rampant between two water bougets of the field.
Crest: Upon a mount Vert a lion’s head Or gorged with a collar Vair between roses barbed seeded leaved and stalked Proper.
Motto: In veritate Victoria. (BLG18)


HYGHLORD

alias HELLARD of Mitcham, also of Devon.
Arms: Sable a bend flory Argent.
Crest: A ship in full sail in a sea all Proper. (BGA)


ILLINGWORTH

of Mitcham.
Arms: Argent a cross flory Gules between three escallops Sable.
From brasses in Mitcham Church to Richard Illingworth, (d.1511), and to Ralph Illingworth, (d.1572). (SAC xxx 94)

But at (SV1530), William Illingworth of Mitcham, is recorded, possibly in error, as bearing Argent a fess flory and counterflory Gules between three escallops Sable.

Crest. Burke gives for Illingworth, of Surrey: Within a crescent Argent a cock crowing Sable. (BGA)


MALLABY-DEELEY

Sir Harry Mallaby Mallaby-Deeley, 1st Bart., JP, MA, LL.M (Cantab), of Mitcham Court, (1863-1937), was created Baronet 1922. The title expired on the death, 1962, of his grandson Sir Anthony Meyrick Mallaby-Deeley, 3rd Bart., of Slater’s Oak, Effingham.

Arms: Quarterly, 1 and 4, Sable a chevron engrailed Ermine between in chief two fleurs-de-lys and in base a crescent Or (Deeley); 2 and 3, Or a bunch of nettles Proper and a chief Sable (Mallaby).

Crests: 1, A sinister cubit arm in armour gauntleted holding in the hand a dagger point downwards Proper pommel and hilt Or between two spurs Gold (Deeley); 2, Issuant from clouds Proper a demi Pegasus Argent winged and charged on the shoulder with a fleur-de-lys Azure.

Motto: Quod Deus vult. (BP99)


OAKES

of Mitcham Hall, Bart.,

Arms: Argent on a chevron engrailed Sable between three sprigs of oak fructed Proper a cross of eight points of the field on a canton Gules a mullet of as many points within an increscent of the first.

Crest: Out of a mural crown Gules a buck’s head erased Proper gorged with a collar embattled counter-embattled Or.

Motto: Persevere. (BGA)


PONTIFEX

William Pontifex of Grove Lodge, Mitcham, later of Cheshunt, Hertfordshire, and of London, merchant, (1766-1851), had issue, a 2nd son William Pontifex of Chichester, {Sussex} and London, (1793-1870), who was father of, amongst others, William Pontifex of Denbighs, Haslemere, and of Chilworth Manor. Arms: Azure in base barry of four Argent and of the first a bridge of three arches embattled Proper and a chief of the second thereon two pallets between as many mullets of the field.

Crest: A tower Proper charged with a cross moline Azure surmounted by a rainbow also Proper.

Motto: In hoc signo vinces. (BFR; FD7)


ROBINSON

Major-General Sir Charles Walker Robinson, KCB, the Rifle Brigade, (1836-1924), 4th son of Sir John Beverley Robinson, 1 st Bart., of Beverley House, Toronto, (1791-1863), was at one time of Beverley House, Mitcham Common. The family formerly bore: Arms: Per chevron Vert and Azure on a chevron nebulé between three stags trippant Or an unicorn’s head couped between two cinquefoils of the first. Crest: A stag trippant Or semé of lozenges Azure and resting the dexter forefoot on a millrind Sable. Motto: Properè et providè. (BP58; FBC) The family now bears: Arms: Or on a chevron between three stags trippant Vert as many cinquefoils of the field. Crest: A stag trippant Vert bezanté. Motto: As above. {Properè et providè} (BP105; FD7)


ROTLAND

of Surrey.

Arms: Or on a fess between three boars’ heads erect and erased Gules as many spearheads of the first. Crest: A nag’s head Or erased per fess Gules maned of the last. (BGA) Burke also gives this crest for Rutland, or Roushland, of Mitcham, qv, as does Fairbairn. (FBC)


RUTLAND [ROUTHLAND]

of Mitcham.

Arms: Gules and inescutcheon Or all within a bordure of the second. Crest: A horse head Or, erased and maned Gules. * As borne by Nicholas Rutland, son of Nicholas Rutland, son of Francis Rutland, son of Nicholas Rutland of Mitcham, (d.1582), Clerk of the Catry, son of Francis Rutland, son of William Rutland of Canterbury, Kent, son of .. Rutland, alias Routhland of Essex. (Harl. Ms 1561, fo 54b) * Burke gives for Rutland, or Roushland, of Mitcham: Arms: Gules an orle engrailed on the inner side Or a bordure also engrailed of the last. Crest: A nag’s head Or erased per fess Gules maned of the last. (BGA)


RUTLAND

Frederick William Rutland, of Mitcham. Arms: Or an orle engrailed on the inner side Gules between eight estoiles in orle Azure. Crest: A horse’s head erased Sable semé of annulets Or in the mouth a branch of fern Proper. Motto: Post proelia proemia. (BGA)


SHERMAN

of Mitcham.

Arms: Or a lion rampant Sable between three holly leaves Vert a mullet for difference. Crest: A demi-lion rampant couped Sable holding in his dexter paw a sprig of holly Vert. From the monument in Mitcham Church to Bazaleel Sherman, (d.Aug 25, 1670), merchant of London. (MB ii 503)


SIMPSON

The Simpson family acquired Mitcham Canons by the marriage of William Simpson, of Lichfield, {Staffordshire}, to Emily, daughter of Captain Richard Dixon, post Cranmer, qv; William F J Simpson was Lord of the Manor in 1912. Arms: Per bend sinister Or and Sable a lion rampant counterchanged holding between the paws a gauntlet Azure. Crest: An ounce’s head Proper erased and ducally crowned Gules charged on the neck with a gauntlet Or. (VCHS iv 231; BGA)


SMITH

of Mitcham.

Arms: Argent on a chevron engrailed Azure between three greyhound heads erased Sable collared Gules as many estoiles Or. Crest: A stag head couped Gules attired Argent. * As borne (SV1623) by George and Thomas Smith, both of Mitcham, sons of Thomas Smith of Mitcham. * Burke gives this as: Arms: Argent on a chevron engrailed Azure between three greyhounds’ heads erased Sable collared Or ringed Gules as many estoiles (another mullets) of the fourth. Crest: A stag’s head erased Gules attired Argent. (BGA)


STANLEY

Earl of Derby. Sir Thomas Stanley, KG, Lord Stanley, (c.1405-59), acquired a share in the manor of Dorking by marriage to Joan, daughter and coheir of Sir Robert Goushill of Hoveringham, Nottinghamshire, by his wife Elizabeth, (d.1425), widow of Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, (d.1399), and daughter of Richard FitzAlan, Earl of Arundel, (executed 1397). His son Thomas, 1st Earl of Derby, (c 1435-1504), acquired half the manor of Reigate, which was sold in 1600 after the death, spm, 1594, of Ferdinando, 5th Earl of Derby. In 1759, Sir Edward Stanley, 5th Bart., 11th Earl of Derby, (1689-1776), acquired the lease of Lambert’s Oaks, Mitcham, which his grandson Edward, 12th Earl of Derby, (1752-1834), bought in 1788. * The 17th Earl of Derby was one of the principal landowners in Thursley in 1920. (VCHS iii 59, 144-6, 235-6, iv 247) Arms: Argent on a bend Azure three stags’ heads cabossed Or. Crest: On a chapeau Gules turned up Ermine an eagle wings extended Or preying on an infant in its cradle Proper swaddled Gules the cradle laced Gold. Supporters: Dexter, A griffin wings elevated; Sinister, A stag; both Or and each ducally collared with line reflexed over the back Azure. Motto: Sans changer. (BP105) * “He used the house as a hunting and racing box, and the famous sweepstakes whence the Derby and the Oaks originated were founded there”. (VCHS)


STAPLES

Roger Staples of The Close, Salisbury, {Wiltshire},(1694-1745), had issue, amongst others, an eldest son Roger Staples, JP, of Mitcham Hall, a London banker, (dsp. 1778), and a 2nd son Charles Staples of London, (b.1728), who was father of, amongst others, Moses William Staples, of Norwood, banker and alderman of London, (1762-1802). His son, Moses William Staples of Norwood, and of Broughton Gifford, Wiltshire, (1786-1864), married, 1811, Anne, daughter of the Rev. William Frederick Browne of Launton, Oxfordshire, and coheir of her brother Captain William Frederick Browne, of Launton and North Berwick. Their eldest son Richard Thomas Staples-Browne of Launton, (1814-55), assumed the additional name and arms of Browne on succeeding to Launton, 1842. Arms: Quarterly, 1 and 4, Ermine on a bend Azure between two fleurs-de-lys Gules three leopards’ heads jessant-de-lys Or (Staples); 2 and 3, Sable a bend engrailed Ermine on a chief Argent an escallop Gules between two torteaux (Browne). Crests: 1, Out of a crown vallary Argent a lion’s head affronté Gules semé-de-lys and ducally crowned Or (Staples); 2, An eagle displayed sable wings fretty resting each claw on a mullet Or (Browne). Motto: Sans Dieu rien. (BLG5)


THOMSON

Fairbairn records W W Thomson of Hill Farm, Mitcham, as using for Crest: On a chapeaux Proper a sword in pale point upwards between two wings. (FBC)


THOROLD

Lieutenant-Colonel Hayford Douglas Thorold, CBE, West Riding Regiment, of East Clandon, (1861-1934), was son of Major-General Reginald Gother Thorold, RE, (1837-1928), and descended from Sir John Thorold, 9th Bart., (1734-1815), who was ancestor also of the Rev. John Robert Hayford Thorold, MA (Cantab), Vicar of Mitcham, (b.1916), elder son of the Rev. Ernest Hayford Thorold, CB, CBE, MA, DD (Oxon), (1879-1940), Chaplain of the Tower of London, 1931-38. Arms: Sable three goats salient Argent. Crest: A roebuck passant Argent attired Or. Motto: Cervus non servus. (BP105; FD7)


WATNEY

Daniel Watney of Wimbledon, (1705-80), was grandfather of Daniel Watney of Mitcham, (1771-1831), Master of the Mercers Company, 1816, who married, 1792, Mary, (d.1830), eldest daughter of James Galpin of Galpins, Mitcham, and sister and coheir of Captain James Galpin, 54th Regiment. Many of his descendants were Masters of the Mercers’ Company, including his eldest son Daniel Watney, (1799-1874); his 2nd son James Watney of Haling Park and Beddington, (1800-84), father of James Watney of Beddington, (1832-86), Master, 1879; and his 3rd son John Watney of Mitcham, (1804-75), father of Sir John Watney, JP, FSA, of Shermanbury House, Reigate, (1834-1923), Clerk of the Mercers’ Company, 1875-1906, whose 2nd son Stephen Cecil Watney of Chaldon Mead, Merstham, (1868-1954), was Master, 1920, and whose 3rd son Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Frank Dormay Watney, KCVO, CBE, TD, DL, of The Little Boltons and of Copleys, Reigate, (b.1870), was Clerk to the Company, 1919-40. Of the same family, Dendy Watney of Rothesay, Gower Road, Weybridge, (b.1865), was younger son of Daniel Watney of Ventnor, Isle of Wight, (b.1835). Arms: Quarterly, 1 and 4, Azure a cross engrailed Ermine in the first and fourth quarters a dove Argent and in the second and third a garb Or (Watney); 2 and 3, Quarterly Argent and Or a cross fleuretté Gules in the first and fourth quarters a lion rampant of the last charged with three bars of the second (Galpin). Crest: On a mount Vert in front of a garb erect Or a greyhound courant Sable gorged with a collar therefrom pendent a bugle-horn Gold. Mottoes: Virtute et industria. (BLG18) Vive ut vivas. (FBC)


WORSFOLD

Sir Thomas Cato Worsfold, 1st and last Bart., DL, JP, MA, LL.D (TCD), of The Hall Place, Mitcham, solicitor, (d.1936), son of William Worsfold of The Hall Place, was MP for Mitcham, 1918-23, and was created Baronet, 1924. Arms: Argent on a mount Vert a beacon fired between three lambs Proper. Crest: Within a crown palisado Or a shepherd’s hound Proper. Motto: I watch the fold. (DPB1936)

Unveiling of the Mitcham War Memorial

From the Mitcham and Tooting Mercury, 26th November, 1920

UNVEILING OF MITCHAM’S WAR MEMORIAL.

The war shrine, situated on the Lower Green, Mitcham, was unveiled last Sunday by Major-General Sir H. E. Watts, K.C.B., C.M.G. (formerly commanding the 7th Division and 19th Corps, B.E.F.). The weather, although very cold, was fine, and about 5,000 people were present at the unveiling.

Alderman R. M. Chart (Chairman of the War Memorial Committee) said that this shrine was to commemorate the self-sacrifice of those who made the supreme sacrifice, and show our undying sorrow felt by those who have lost dear ones in the late war. Two years ago the war terminated, and in February, 1919, a committee was formed for the purpose of raising funds for the war shrine. There was some difficulty as to the most prominent place for the shrine, and on Peace Day, when the temporary memorial was put behind the Vestry Hall, it was proposed that that should be the site for the permanent one. It is also proposed now that a fencing should be placed round the shrine, but with facilities for the public to place flowers on it, which he (Mr. R. M. Chart) was sure they would do from time to time. He also said that every effort had been made to obtain the names of men who had been killed in action or died of wounds, and, at present, there were 557 names inscribed on the shrine, and since then more had come to hand, and would be inscribed in due course. The speaker then said it was his duty and pleasure to introduce Major-General Sir H. E. Watts, K.C.B., C.M.G., who had well served his country in the late war. He was commanding in the first and third Battle of Ypres.

Major-General Sir H. E. Watts, K.C.B., C.M.G., said, after what Mr. Chart had said, there was not much more to say, but there was one incident that he would like to remind them of, and that was the late Earl Kitchener’s appeal of “Your King and Country need you,” at the beginning of the war, in which all men flocked to enlist. “Why !” because they knew that they were going to fight for freedom and endure the hardships of war, which was a fine example of self-sacrifice and unselfishness. All honour was due to them who came forward at the country’s call. The men, women and children were also a great help, for, while we soldiers were fighting, those at home endured many hardships, but without murmuring. He then unveiled the memorial, and the “Last Post” was played by buglers of the East Surrey Regiment.

The hymn, “Nearer my God to Thee,” was sung, and then the invocation and prayers were said by Rev. C. A. Finch, the Vicar of Mitcham, after which Rev. J. F. Cowley, the the Zion Congregational Church, said a few words.

Rev. J. F. Cowley said that, in doing honour to those who laid down their lives for us, there should be no mistake, for if they had not done so, no English home would be intact and safe to-day, but the unspeakable happenings in Belgium would have happened in England, and, perhaps, have been even worse, because it was against England that the Germans were so bitter and revengeful. He said we should thank God and our fallen heroes for such a merciful deliverance, and also think God for such sons, fathers, brothers and sweethearts who so cheerfully laid down their lives to save us from shame and dishonour. They must not forget to honour and thank the mothers who gave the best, they had got; and in the future, when one was in despair, they should just go to the shrine and remember what, Englishmen could and did do for their country, because they thought that, if it was worth living for, it was worth dying for. Those present then proceeded to place their floral tributes on the shrine, during which Mr. Rudyard Kipling’s “Recessional” was sung.

The Jubilee Lodge, R.A.O.B., sent a wreath in memory of fallen “Buffs.” Other lodges also sent wreaths.

The special constables were present under the command of Inspectors Webb and Freeman. Colonel Bidder, D.S.O., was present, and a detachment of ex-Service men lined up round the inside of the ropes. The music for the hymns was played by the Mitcham and Wimbledon Military Band, conducted by Mr. H. Salter.

Ravensbury Manor

News Articles

BAPTISM IN GARAGE

In a tiny chapel constructed in corner of the garage at Ravensbury Manor, Mitcham, the residence of Colonel H. F. Bidder, Rosemary Vivian, the youngest child of Colonel and Mrs. Bidder, was baptised on Saturday afternoon. The service was conducted by the Rev. A. J. Culwick, Rector of Morden. A silver-mounted bowl presented to the six-weeks old baby by members of the Essay Club, Society of Antiquaries, of which Colonel Bidder is member, was used as a temporary font.

The chapel, which seats about a dozen people, is used for Sunday evening services by the Bidder family, and by number of residents near the manor, to save the long walk to Mitcham or Modern Churches. Colonel Bidder occasionally takes the services himself.

Source: Shepton Mallet Journal – Friday 15 March 1929 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)