Tag Archives: 1888

Other Windsor Berry

In 1881, he was a surgeon and medical practitioner. In 1888 he was a divisional surgeon of police at Wimbledon.

In the 1891 and 1896 directories, his father, also called Other Windsor Berry, was listed as living at 7, Glebe Villas, Whitford Lane. His father was still at this address when he died in 1901, as shown in his will. His father left him and his brother £1,352 13s. When Other Windsor Berry died in 1908, he left £5,652 17s. 6d. (£700,000 in 2020 values).

He gave evidence in the murder trial of George Henry Lamson at the Old Bailey, 27th February 1882, who was accused of murdering Percy Malcolm John, a pupil at Blenheim House School at Wimbledon. He said:

I am a surgeon and registered medical practitioner, practising at Wimbledon

— I knew the deceased Percy Malcolm John, and had known him about a year and a half; I had frequently seen him before the 3rd of December — I had attended him for one slight illness in March, 1881, while he was at the school—it was a little skin eruption—in June, 1881, I vaccinated him—those were the only occasions—with the exception of the paralysis of his lower limbs his health I believe was generally good

Source : Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 25 November 2020), February 1882, trial of GEORGE HENRY LAMSON (29) (t18820227-367).


In 1888, he gave evidence in a trial at the Old Bailey on 2nd July 1888, against Charles Savage, 21, and Elizabeth Thatcher, 18, for robbery with violence on George Northcroft (Policeman V 265), and stealing 1s. 5d. and a silver watch and chain.

he said:

I am divisional surgeon of police at Wimbledon.

— I saw the prosecutor at the station about 1 on this morning — his face was bruised and swollen; the left eye actually closed from a blow — there was a wound from a quarter to half an inch long over his left eye, and abrasions on the cheek and upper lip from scratches—the throat was swollen, with marks of pressure on it — he is still off duty, and has been under my care since that time.

Source : Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 25 November 2020), July 1888, trial of CHARLES SAVAGE(21) ELIZABETH THATCHER(18) (t18880702-707).

Extracts from the Old Bailey Proceedings project, courtesy of Tim Hitchcock, Robert Shoemaker, Clive Emsley, Sharon Howard and Jamie McLaughlin, et al., The Old Bailey Proceedings Online, 1674-1913 (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 7.0, 24 March 2012).

Mortuary Chapel in parish churchyard

In 1882, the parish church’s burial ground was enlarged and a mortuary chapel was built by Crockett at a cost of £1,761, as referred to in an advertised tender in the Surrey Mirror. (Adjusted for inflation, this was the equivalent of around £200,000 today.)

An entrance from Church Road was made, opposite the post office (later 71 Church Road). A path from this entrance led to a circular path in front the chapel.

The new burial ground was consecrated on 15th January 1883 by the Bishop of Rochester.

zoomed in clip from 1947 aerial image on Britain from Above website

This 1910 Ordnance Survey map shows the entrance to the chapel as being opposite the letter box on the west side of Church Road. Another building is shown north east of the chapel, along the wall with Miles Road. The entrance that is there today is not shown and it is not known whether this building was related to the mortuary chapel.

1910 OS map


When Mitcham became part of the London Borough of Merton in 1965, the Coroner decided that autopsies and inquests would be performed at Battersea for both Merton and Wandsworth. This decision was recorded in the minutes of the Parks, Cemeteries and Allotments Committee dated 26th May 1965:

612. Mitcham and Wimbledon Mortuaries

The Director of Parks reported

(i) that following the reorganisation of the London boroughs, H.M. Coroner had decided that as from the 1st April, 1965, he will hold all inquests for both the London boroughs of Merton and Wandsworth at the Battersea Coroner’s Court and that consequently all autopsies on bodies will be carried out at the Battersea Mortuary; and

(ii) that no request has been made to use the Wimbledon and Mitcham mortuaries which had been kept in readiness since the 1st April in case local funeral directors wish to use them as Chapels of Rest, and

(iii) that consequently there seemed to be no necessity to keep the mortuaries available particularly as some financial arrangements would have to be agreed with the London Borough of Wandsworth for bodies admitted to the Battersea Mortuary from this borough.

Source: Minutes of proceedings of the council and committees, London Borough of Merton Council Minutes, 1965-66, volume 2, part 1.

On page 68 of Mitcham Histories: 12 Church Street and Whitford Lane, by the late Eric Montague, is a photograph of the building he took around 1990. The colour version of this photo can be seen on the Merton Historical Society’s website, although it says that it was taken in the 1970s.

Today, nothing is left of the chapel building, although the circular path remains. It is currently not known when it was demolished.

Photo taken 26th April 2017 of plot where mortuary chapel once stood.

Measurements made using the online map show the length of 45 feet along its east-west side, and its depth of 30 feet along its north-south side.

Inquests were held at the Mortuary Chapel. Here are links to some newspaper articles that reported them.

1895 Death from pleurisy
1910 Miss Ellen Peerless, of the Ship Laundry


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.


Minutes of meetings held by the London Borough of Merton are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.