Tag Archives: Bucks Head

1827 auction of Patent Steam Laundry at Phipps Bridge

clip from Merton Memories reference Mit_Work_Industry_2-3

From the Sun (London) – Wednesday 08 August 1827, via the British Newspaper Archive

The Patent Steam Washing Company’s Valuable and Extensive Premises, at Phipps-bridge, Mitcham, Surrey, with Two Steam Engines, and all the Capital Machinery.

TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION,
By WINSTANLEY and SONS,

At the Mart, on TUESDAY, AUGUST 14, at Twelve, in One Lot, by Order of the Assignees, and with consent of the Mortgagees.

THE Valuable and Extensive PREMISES, comprising a newly-erected Building about two hundred and fourteen feet long and sixty-one feet wide, situate adjoining that well-known and fine stream the River Wandle. Together with Two Steam Engines, one of ten-horse and the other six-horse power ; seven large washing wheels, an Hydraulic Press of immense power, with ironing and calendering apparatus, and all other suitable fittings and machinery for the various departments, and forming one of the most complete establishments of the kind in the Kingdom, and the whole is easily applicable for a Brewery, Calico Printing, and many other descriptions of manufacture.

Also, very extensive Stabling, Coach or Waggon-houses, Yards, &c. The above Premises are holden by Lease for Ninety-nine Years, at £31 10s. per annum.

Likewise a New Brick Erection fitted up as a Dyehouse, containing several large Coppers, with Leaden Cisterns and other apparatus of the most approved constructions, and upon a very excellent scale, held for thirty years, at £9 per annum.

And a Field of Meadow Land, about Fifteen Acres, well calculated for a Drying or Bleaching Ground, with a Timber Building about 110 feet long and 21 wide, fitted up as a canteen, and supplied with suitable cooking apparatus and appendages.

To be viewed by Tickets only, which with particulars l may be had of Mr. de Mole, solicitor, at Merchant Tailors’ , Hall ; of Messrs.. Rankin and Rickards, solicitors, Basinghall-street ;of Messrs. Gregson and Fonnergau, Angel Court, Throgmorton-street ; and of Winstanley and Sons, Paternoster-row ; particulars may also be had at the Buck’s Head, Mitcham ; Greyhound, and King’s Arms, Croydon ; the King’s Arms, Carshalton ; Spread Eagle, Epsom ; Griffin, and Castle, Kingston ; of Thomas Winstanley and Son, at Liverpool and at Manchester ; and at the Inns at Glasgow.

From the Sun (London) – Wednesday 08 August 1827, via the British Newspaper Archive.

The ‘Field of Meadow Land, about 15 acres’, is likely to be the area shown on this 1894 OS map on the west side of the river Wandle with the horizontal lines. Using the National Library of Scotland’s area measurement tool, this area is 0.06 square kilometres, or 14 acres. Currently this area is the site of Wimbledon Studios on Windsor Avenue.

1893 OS map

1976 : Mr Sparrowhawk out-drinks horse in Bucks Head

From the Sunday People, 31st October, 1976, via the British Newspaper Archive.

Mr Sparrowhawk out-drinks Boozy Toby

It looked like a cert for Toby the pony when he met Ron Sparrowhawk in a challenge beer drinking contest.

Observers of form in the public bar at the Bucks Head, Mitcham, Surrey, pointed to the size of his mouth, the length of his his tongue and his great capacity for liquid.

Challenger Ron Sparrowhawk, they argued, though known to be a fast man with a pint, was taking on more than his weight. The smart money was going on Toby, a proven sprinter over anything from one to six pints.

The public bar was tense when timekeeper Mike Green, landlord at the Bucks Head, put up Toby’s pint.

It was a smooth three-lap performance – three laps of that long tongue and the pint was gone in a snappy six seconds.

Then it was the turn of Ron Sparrowhawk.

He looked confident as he took his stance opposite his pint, nicely placed at the edge of the bar.

He raised the glass with a nice easy action, placed it to his lips.

Then, as the crowd fell silent, Ron downed the pint in an amazing three seconds.

Over

The contest was over. The dark horse had won.

What the punters didn’t know is that Ron Sparrowhawk, of Bond Road, Mitcham, is an expert on the drinking capacity of animals.

“I’ve always been a drinking man,” he said later, “so naturally I’ve been curious about what other animals can sink.

“I wanted to put my theories to the test with Toby, hence the challenge.

“I just open my mouth and pour. It’s like tipping it down a drain.

“Toby has a long tongue, I grant you. But I’ve got the technique. And a long longue is no match for technique.

“Watch the drinkers in any local. How many long tongues do you see?

“Mind you, that Toby can hold more than I can. But he hasn’t got the speed.”

Ron, who owns a shellfish stall, was full of praise for his beaten rival.

“He’s a plucky contestant that Toby and I’m planning a rematch.”

Landlord Mike Green said that Toby started drinking beer six months ago.

“He has three pints in the morning and three at night.”

1932 Death of Mrs Poluski

From the Norwood News – Friday 29 January 1932, from the British Newspaper Archive, which requires a subscription.

A FAMOUS VARIETY STAR

Death of Mrs. Will Poluski

HER KINDNESS TO ALL

Mitcham has lost a famous resident by the death of Mrs. Harriet Poluski, widow of the late Mr. Will Poluski, one of the famous Poluski Brothers, comedians. Mrs. Poluski lived with her son, Mr. Sam Poluski, manager of the Three Kings Hotel, Mitcham Common, Mrs. Poluski being the licensee.

She had been ill for some time, and on Monday week went into Wilson Hospital for an operation. This was supposed to have been successful, and Mrs. Poluski was expected to get well again. It came as a great shock to her relatives when she suddenly collapsed and died on Friday morning. Her age was 72. — While living at Mitcham Mrs. Poluski had endeared herself to a large circle of friends. She was a very affable lady, and, in the words of a friend, was a “dear old soul.” Everybody who knew her spoke highly of her wonderful traits of sympathy, generosity and optimism. Her death will be mourned generally, and particularly by her local acquaintances, to many of whom she was a fairy godmother.

STAR OF FORMER DAYS.

As Nettie Waite, comedienne, Mrs. Poluski was well known on the variety stage more than thirty years ago — a star of former days.

She and her husband had been married nearly fifty years when Mr. Poluski died, about eight years ago. This was two years after the death of his partner-brother, Sam, had brought to a close a famous musical hall partnership lasting nearly half-a-century.

Mrs. Poluski leaves one son, Mr. Sam Poluski, of the Three Kings, and two daughters. Her other son, Mr. Will Poluski, jun., who was Miss Rosie Lloyd’s husband, died about two years ago while on a stage tour in South Africa. His death, following closely on that of his father, was a big blow to the mother.

The two daughters, who are well known in the stage world, are Miss Winifred Ward, the comedienne, and Mrs. Lottie McNaughton, wife of Mr. Gus McNaughton, the talented comedian.

Mrs. Poluski’a grand-daughter — Miss Winifred Ward’s daughter — is Miss Polly Ward, who for a time was one of the “Trix Sisters,” and who also appeared with the Co-optimists.

THE FUNERAL.

The funeral of Mrs. Poluski took place on Tuesday at Lambeth Cemetery, Tooting, her remains being laid to rest in the same grave as that of her husband.

The Rev. W. K. Roberts, Vicar of St Mark’s, Mitcham, conducted the services both at the Three Kings and the graveside.

Handsome wreaths were sent by the following: Sam, Winnie and Lottie (son and daughters); Jack, Bino, and Lottie (grandchildren); Gus, Ted and Bob (sons-in-law); Rosie Lloyd (daughter-in-law)l Sam F. Poluski (nephew); Gertie (niece); Mrs George Le Clerq, Brother George and family. Sister Emmie and Niece Em???y. Misses Rose and Peggy Hamilton, Mollie Melvin. A.F. Page, Mr and Mrs Peat, Mr and Mrs Townsend and family; Croydon District Licensed Victuallers’ Association. Bee Low, E.J. Eidman and family, The Plough (Sutton). Mrs Brown (Beehive). Mr and Mrs Percy Goodyer, Mr and Mrs Tyler and family. Mr and Mrs Harry Lovatt, Mr and Mrs Singfield Mitcham Conservative Club; Arthur and Mabel Le Clerq.

A few friends, Cecil, Jack, and E Rubber. Mr and Mrs Jones (King’s Arms, Mitcham). Mrs Godfrey and family (Nags Head). Mr and Mrs J.W. Moore and Lorna. Mrs James, W. Payne, Binnie and Leo Boys of the Brighton Cruising Club. Major and Mrs Poole (Buck’s Head, Mitcham). Brothers of the Order of Druids; Fred Griffiths and family; Staff of the Three Kings; Mr Keith B. Harris, Lloyd family, Mrs S. Hartley and Doris; boys of the Three Kings public bar; Miss Clare Romaine. H.E. and S.F. Fowkes. Mr and Mrs W. Laing. Mrs and Mrs Donn. Ruby (Three Kings). Mr and Mrs Brown (florist). Mr and Percy Mayhew; Hengler family. Kathleen Blunden. Mr and Mrs T. Witherden. Mr and Mrs Batchelor; Mitcham Athletic Club. Mrs J. Boxall, Bob and Jennie Leonard, etc.

Messrs W.P. Mellhuish and Sons, Mitcham and Tooting, were the undertakers.

1924 Fracas at the Bucks Head

“SABINI BOYS” AGAIN.
ROWDY SCENE AT MITCHAM.

Arising out of fracas at The Buck’s Head, Mitcham, on the previous day, Ernest Charles Straney, thirty-four, of Lollard-Street Kennington; Edward Wiggins, twenty-six, of Brixton; and George Wiggins, twenty-five, of Lyndhurst-road, Chadwell Heath, were charged before the Croydon County Bench with having been disorderly and assaulting Major Poole, M.C., licensee of the house, Mr. S. G. Leney, manager, Police-sergeant Constable, and Police-constable Siviour. Blows with fists, kicking, and biting were alleged.

Mr. Stanley Smith, prosecuting, said that six men arrived in a taxi, and appeared be such a rough lot that the licensee asked a constable to stand by. Straney left the saloon bar and went into the dining-room, and began strumming the piano. As soon as he was asked to return to the bar, where the men had ordered drinks and smokes, the row started. Major Poole was injured on his right arm, which would have to be X-rayed.

Major Poole, in his evidence, said one of the men boasted of being a pugilist. Leney was struck violently on the face while carrying a pile of plates.

Police-constable Siviour and two other police witnesses said they drew their truncheons and used them, owing to the violence of the prisoners. Whilst struggling on the ground Siviour said he felt himself being overpowered and struck George Wiggins on the back of the head, which for a time made him unconscious. At the police station, where they were taken in a lorry, George Wiggins threatened to kill the witness, and added, “We are some of the Sabini Boys.”

Police Inspector Perkins, in asking for a remand, said that the men no doubt had come to Mitcham for a purpose, and the matter might turn out to be much more serious than appeared at the moment.

The Bench granted the application, and allowed bail to the prisoners in their own recognisances, with two sureties each of £20.

Source: Illustrated Police News – Thursday 22 May 1924 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

See also Peaky Blinders Fandom wiki web page.

1973 Three publicans to be replaced by managers

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 18th May, 1973, page 1.

Storm brewing over pubs plan

Regulars at two Mitcham pubs are ready to put their backs to the bar and fight a bid by the brewers to evict their licensees.

At the Bucks Head in the Fair-green, Mrs Ivy Garner has been told to quit after 20 years.

At the Fountain in Western Road, Mr John Brown, whose family have run the pub for 42 years, has been told he must be out by September or sooner if possible.

The changes are part of a general trend towards managers. A spokesman for the brewers, Bass Charrington, said: “When we spend large sums of money on a pub it would put up the rent beyond the means of the average tenant and so we have to go in for managers.”

He added that a manager would be going into the Fountain, which was included in a council redevelopment plan and big changes will be made at the Bucks Head which could well mean a manager there as well.

Negotiating

A third tenant will also be moving. Charringtons say Mr Alf Pays of the Beehive in Commonside-east has asked to be released from his tenancy agreement but Mr Pays, who is 74, will neither admit or deny this. All he is prepared to say is that he is having negotiations with the brewers.

Signatures are being collected for three separate petitions and Fountain regular Mr Peter Wiseman warned that if the worst comes the worst he will park his mechanical shovel outside the door to stop John Brown being turned out.

He said John is the greatest publican in Mitcham. He’s lived in this pub all his life and he is getting a raw deal. I aim to top my petition with he names of all the landlords in Mitcham.

Mr Brown said he’s not moving until he has a new home. “I’m negotiating with the brewers for compensation but they haven’t offered me enough and at the same time I am looking for somewhere else to live but until both of these are settled I’m not budging and while I’m here it will be business as usual.”

Mrs Garmer thought it would be fairer if Bass Charrington adopted Courage Barclay’s policy. She said: “Courage are putting in managers as well but they wait until the tenants retires. I’m 59 so they wouldn’t have long to wait.”

One of the regulars who is signing the petition is Mr Charlie Harvey, manager of a nearby engineering equipment shop. “I know just what happens when a manager goes in because of my local in Richmond the tenant has just been made a manager and the place is not the same anymore. Once it used to be home, now it’s a business.”

If Alf Pays moves from the Beehive, Mitcham will not only lose its best known publican – he’s been there for 43 years and his father had the pub before him but it would also lose a charitable institution.

He helps to raise money for children, nurses and old folk.

Chairman of the Pollards Oak Fishing Club, who use the club room at the pub, Mr Bill Haynes, is organising the petition there. He said they can’t get rid of Alf, he’s part of the establishment.”

1822 Bucks Head referred to in auction

Building Materials, Chaise Cart, Household Furniture, &c. Upper Tooting, Surrey.——By FLAMSTON and ELLIS, on the Premises, adjoining the Bell, in Upper Tooling, on TUESDAY, June 25, at Twelve, in Lots, THE useful Materials of Four brick and timber-built Cottages, comprising brickwork, plain and pantiles, rafters, sound oak beams, girders, framed sashes, pannelled doors, floor boards, staircases, partitions, sundry useful materials, a light chaise cart, two feather beds, and a few lots of furniture, &c. To be viewed on Monday and morning of sale. Catalogues had on the Premises at the Bell Inn, Tooting; at the Buck’s Head, Mitcham; at the Elephant and Castle, Newington; and of the Auctioneers, 76 and 143, Minories.

Source: Morning Advertiser – Saturday 22 June 1822 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

1940 Tallest landlord has taller successor

From national press
10th March 1940

Tallest landlord (6ft. 3in.) has taller successor
For nineteen years the landlord of the Buck’s Head, Mitcham, has been Major W. H. Poole, who, standing 6ft. 3ins. tall, was the tallest licensee in the district.

Yesterday the license was transferred to Mr. W. Langham, of Battersea, who is 6ft. 4 1/2 in., a former amateur boxer and film actor.

Both men are retired policemen.