Tag Archives: John R Chart

1879 Rock Terrace Coffee and Club Room

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 12 April 1879

Rock-Terrace Coffee and Club Room.

— A successful entertainment was given in the Mission Room connected with the above on Friday evening, April 4th, by the Band of Hope branch of the Church of England Temperance Society. A. Maclaclan, Esq., took the chair. The choir sang several pieces during the evening.

The recitations were excellent, and the following are deserving of special notice :

“They didn’t think;” by Alfred Bale;
“A dinner and a kiss,” Alice Boxall;
“The blind men and the elephant,” William Goodge;
“The twins’ mishaps,” George Bale;
“Christmas in the bush,” Louisa Singleton;
“Cruel play,” Alfred Gardiner;
“Billy’s rose” (from the Dagonet ballads), Ruth Smith;
“The little boy’s speech,” Frank Boxall;
“My first doll,” Rose Greenaway;
“Paddy and the jug,” Emily Boxall;
“The newsboy’s debt,” Lillian Service.

A hearty vote of thanks was given at the close to Mr. W. Service and Mr. J. R. Chart, the secretaries, also to Miss Glanister, who presided at the harmonium, and all who had taken part.

1890 15th Annual Treat for Bath Road Mission Hall Sunday School

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 09 August 1890

School Treat.

— The fifteenth annual treat in connection with the Bath-road Mission Room Sunday School took place on Wednesday, the grounds Mr. Nobes being, as usual, kindly placed their disposal for the purpose. It may be mentioned that this Mission is mainly supported by Captain Blakeney, R.N., who formerly resided in the district and who continues to take kindly interest in the welfare of his old friends. Mr. Champion, the superintendent of the school, ably carried out the arrangements. About 100 scholars and friends sat down to excellent tea, after which Mr. J. R. Chart obtained some capital group photos. Cricket, swings, &c., amused the youngsters until dusk. The beautiful weather contributed to the general enjoyment.

Notes:
1. Jerman Nobes lived at Wandle House in 1891

Tom Francis

Mitcham News and Mercury 28th August 1953

Mr. THOMAS FRANCIS, head of a family of four generations, died at his daughter’s home at
Warlingham on Saturday.

He was 81.

Born over his father’s shop in London-road, Mr. Francis lived in Mitcham for nearly 80 years, until he retired in April, 1951. Mitcham past and present was his lifelong interest. He was a member of the old Parish Council, a former chairman of Mitcham Civic Society and a former president of the Chamber of Commerce. He was a vice-president of the Civic Society.

Mr. Francis left his own memorial — an extensive collection of historical Mitcham slides, which he presented to Mitcham Borough Libraries. The Francis collection were largely taken from his own negatives, which dated from about 1890. Of the slides, many were taken by the wet-plate process, about 1865-70 by a professional photographer named Drummond and a number made by John R. Chart. A few were gals to him by old friends and some were given by photographers.

FIRST CAMERA

The first camera Mr. Francis’ used for his hobby was of the mahogany box type with a rackwork lens —the type once in common use by beach photographers. In the old days he played regularly in the Upper Mitcham v. Lower Mitcham cricket matches, and when the Wednesday XI was revived in 1925, there were few matches he missed. Between the wars he and his son Tom both used to play.

During the last war he was injured when his house was bombed and later, as a result, he had to have an eye removed.

“He was Mitcham. He lived for Mitcham.” said Mr. Stephen Taylor, on employee of his for many’ years.

Mr. Francis was on the Committee of Wilson Hospital from its foundation and until the hospital was taken over by the State.

He received part of his education at the Mitcham Lodge College, next to London-road Schools, Dr. Smith was the principal. Later he went to the Quaker School at Saffron Walden in which he was also a member of the Society of Friends.

His memory was a treasury of local recollections, both of characters of Mitcham village days and of incidents of village life.

From his childhood he could recall being taken for drives in broughams and wagonettes. One of these ended with the vehicle being stuck in a pond in Morden-road. On other occasions a drive took him through water about a foot deep at Hackbridge.

Other memories were of Quaker meetings at the Mitcham Manor House, cycling expeditions with Alfred and Ernest Mizen, and of Mitcham Fair, when performing bears were on show.

In his youth the “Old Squirt,” the village fire engine was kept in a cage on Lower Green, where the Town Hall now stands.

The business in London-road which bears the name Francis, was started by a Mr. Fitt in 1830 and was taken over by Mr. Francis’s parents in 1870. He began in the business in 1886.

His Quaker funeral at the Cricket Green Methodist Church on Tuesday was attended by the Mayor of Mitcham (Coun. E. E. Mount), Ald. and Mrs. T. L. Ruff, Mr. S. Chart (former Town Clerk), Dr. A. H. Shelswell, Mr. C. J. Farrell (Div. Education Officer), Mr. H. J. Dorrett (Rotary Club), Mr. Dick Gifford (chairman of the Civic Society), Messrs. R. Culmer, J. Pillinger and F. Cole (Mitcham Cricket Club). Mr. S. Taylor (Horticultural Society), Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Bailey, Mr. W. Dalton and representatives of the Society of Friends School at Saffron Walden.

55 Upper Green East

clip from Merton Memories photo, reference Mit_Work_Industry_52-1, copyright London Borough of Merton

Grade II Listed Building on Historic England which says:

House, originally detached. Late C18. Weatherboarded. Slate hipped roof to eaves. 2 storeys, 2 bays. C19 shopfront to ground floor, plate glass. Square headed windows to upper floor, late C20 casements.

Deeds dated 22nd December, 1949, mention Robert Chart as part owner with A.C. Jenner and Albert Crisp as lessee. On 2nd August 1956, Alfred Crisp bought the freehold.

From Merton Memories:
Originally John R. Chart’s shop for the sale of corn and seed. It dates from early 1800. One of the few part weather boarded buildings left it was acquired by Alfred Crisp & Son in 1932 for their boot and shoe repairs business. They remained until 1990 it was then converted to a private home in 1991.

Photo taken 2016

1953 OS map

1953 OS map

A planning application in 1991 was approved for it to be converted from a shop to residential. See 91/P0065.

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.