Tag Archives: swimming baths

1961 Baths Superintendent retires

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 24th February, 1961

For the past 28 years Mr Charles Paterson Walker has been keeping 126,000 gallons of water clean and at the right temperature.

Next May he won’t have to bother any more. He is retiring from the post of Mitcham Baths Superintendent.

But 65-year-old Mr Walker will not be forgotten when he leaves. By the end of the month he hopes to finish his “diary of events,” telling the story of the Baths.

At his Epsom home he told me this week: “There have been so many events there over the years I thought I would keep a record.”

Mr Walker himself has led an interesting life. Before he took over the Baths in 1929 he was a marine engineer on a luxury shipping line. He left because of the big slump at the time.

During the last war his main task was keeping about 150,000 officers and men and 500 Wrens warm. He was in charge of the heating at a Fleet Air Arm training base in Lancashire.

Any plans for his retirement?
“I am just going to take things easy,” he said.

1933 : Second boxing exhibition

Mitcham News & Mercury, 10th February, 1933, page 2.

MORE BOXING AT MITCHAM

Large Attendance at the Baths

EVENING OF GOOD SPORT

…. (preamble omitted) …

The opening contest of the evening was between Boy BINKS, of Streatham, and Sammy SMITH, of Mitcham, over six rounds. It was a hard-hitting match, with both men swinging wildly at each other. The first three mrounds went in favour of Binks, who was more aggressive than Smith. However, the tide turned in favour of Smith during the remaining rounds; he had his man down for a count of eight from a stinging right when the bell stopped the fifth round. The sixth round found Smith attacking most. The referee’s decision was a draw.

Scheduled for eight rounds, the next bout lasted for two. Danny GARDINER, of westbourne Park, outboxed his opponent, Jack DAY, of Kingston. Day went to the boards for a count in the first round, but he fought back strongly, to send his man down for a count, the bell saving him.

In the second round Day was knocked off his feet on two occasions, and the referee intervened in favour of Gardiner, Day sustaining a cut eye.

The next bout was a comic event, Albert LLOYD, of Mitcham, drew with Bill HUNTLEY, of Tooting, over six rounds. Both men evoked much laughter from the spectators by their funny tactics, and when they started a fight of their own between the rounds cheers greeted their efforts. Each man in turn went down for a count, and it seemed quite possible that the fight would end with both men on the boards, but it actually finished with both men still wanting to fight on.

A GOOD MATCH

The big event of the evening was between Kid SOCKS, of Bethnal Green, and Sandy McEWAN, of Glasgow. The fight lasted for the full fifteen rounds, and Socks gave an almost perfect exhibition of how to use the left hand. McEwan, on the other hand, was a hard-punching, two-handed fighter.

For the majority of the bout the fighters were well-matched, McEwan striving hard to batter the elusive Socks. In the end it was a case of those pitiless left leads leaving their mark, and the fourteenth round found McEwan weakening, the last two rounds going definitely in Socks’ favour.

The referee awarded the match to Socks on points, but it was a very close fight.

Harry TAYLOR, of Tooting, was unlucky to be knocked out by Bill LEE, of St. James’s, in the second round of their six-round bout, for with his hard swinging rights and lefts he had his man groggy in the first round. His carelessness in the second led to his undoing, for, leavung himself unguarded while he sought to put his man out, he himself caught a right on the jaw, which finished the bout.

The last fight of the evening, over six rounds, between Jack ROBERTS, of wimbledon, and Tom RADFORD, of Tooting, was a battle royal of hectic youth, Both boys flung discretion to the winds and fought in an alarmingly wild manner. Radford was down for a count of eight in the second round, and the bell saved him from the full count at the end of the third round, when a rather low swing from Roberts caused him considerable distress. In the fifth round Radford took the full count and Roberts was awarded the fight.

The evening was ably conducted by Mr. Harry Brevett, late M.C. at the N.S.C., Albert Hall and Olympia, while Johnny Curley as the referee acquitted himself in a praiseworthy manner. The timekeeper was Mr. Hunter, and seconds Arthur Goodwin and Archie Watson.