Tag Archives: 1867

St Peter & St Paul Roman Catholic Primary School

School whose address is Cricket Green, Mitcham, CR4 4LA. Its entrance from that road is between the Mary Tate Almshouses and number 40.

1954 OS map

The road had previously been called Lower Green East until 1944, when it was renamed Cricket Green.

According to 1 The Cricket Green, page 113 :

The Roman Catholic primary school St Peter and St Paul was rebuilt in 1974, replacing the original chapel school building erected in 1861 on land given by William Simpson Jr.

This OS map from 1910 shows the outline of the school building, its entrance being between the Almshouses and the Britannia pub shown as P.H.

1910 OS map

Kelly and Post Office directories from the late 19th and early 20th centuries state that the school was probably built around 1867, for 80 children. It’s worth noting that the Catholic church was built later than the school, in 1889. The directory of 1912 said that the school was enlarged in 1897, for 148 children, and had an average attendance of 123. The 1912 directory said that the school was enlarged again in 1908 for 180 children. Also in that directory was a list of the six school managers, and their clerk:

James Douglas DREWETT, Ravensbury, Upper Green, Mitcham
Bernard HAYWARD, Post office, London Road, Mitcham
Rev. Bernard W. KELLY, St. Anthony’s Hospital, London Road, North Cheam
Berrill Henry MAGUIRE, The Beeches, London Road, Lower Mitcham
Rev. Joshua POOLEY, The Presbytery, Cranmer Road, Mitcham
William F. J. SIMPSON, Park place, Commonside West, Mitcham

Clerk to Managers, William James DICKISSON, Trent House, 87 Melrose Avenue, Mitcham

The directories also gave the head mistress in charge of the school, as shown in this table, where the years are the directory entries.

YEARS Name
1874 and 1878 Miss Mary A. PARKS
1880 Miss Mary CONWAY
1891 Miss Mary Ann RIGBY
1896 Miss Elizabeth BRYCE
1898, 1901 and 1902 Miss DAWSON
1911, 1912, 1913 and 1915 Miss Annie DERHAM
1918 Miss Elizabeth DAVEY

Miss Davey started teaching in 1887, according to this news article from 1933 which reported on her retiring from head mistress.

A WORTHY TEACHER

Miss Davey, the esteemed head mistress of Mitcham Catholic Day School, is retiring to well-merited leisure after 46 years of teaching. She has put the best years and the best efforts of her life into this school, and she has the consolation of knowing that she has not spent herself in vain. When she leaves at the end of February she will take with her the united good wishes of the priest, the parents, and the children for her devoted service.

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 6th January, 1933, page 1.


The name of the school in the directories was either the Lower Mitcham Catholic School, or the Mitcham Catholic Day School as in the 1933 news item.

Listed in the 1971 phone book as S.S. Peter & Paul R.C. Primary, Cricket Green, telephone 01-648 1459.


Merton Memories Photos

Catholic chapel that was demolished when school was rebuilt in 1974
1970 school playground
undated colour photo of school from Cricket Green

Eric Montague Slides
A 1966 photo of the Sheila Shaw horse riding school, at number 40 next door to the Catholic school, shows part of the entrance and its notice board, that is headed ‘Ss Peter & Paul’s Catholic School’.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Flat Tops

Cottages that were near Tramway Terrace, on the west side of the Carshalton Road, south of Mitcham Junction station, as described by J.D. Drewett in his Memories of Mitcham, published in 1926:

Many old houses in Mitcham have disappeared — a row of old cottages stood behind the Goat Inn — only two remain. Of several old cottages on the farm lands of Messrs. Mizen, along Amoys Lane one remains. Rumbolds Farm — and many old cottages called the Flat Tops — also stood on this estate, and were demolished many years ago. The site of Tramway Terrace was an open garden with only one small cottage at the entrance to Amoys Lane. There was a small pond in front of the Flat Tops, and two wells in the gardens. The railway to Croydon crossed the road level, and had a small cottage for the gatekeeper’s use.

1867 OS map


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Rumbold Farm

1867 OS map

Farm house and land off west side of Carshalton Road, on part of what is now the Willow Lane industrial estate. Also known as Rumbold’s Farm or Rumbold Castle, it dated back to the 17th century.

As reported in the London Evening Standard – Saturday 16 February 1861, the Great Ormond Street Hospital, which had been established in 1852, used its Samaritan Fund to obtain for convalescing children

the renovating influence of sea and country air, and in a large measure the committee were indebted for the opportunity of doing this to the kindness of two friends of the charity, one of whom, at Brighton, undertakes the entire cost of the Home which she has established there, whilst Lady Harding receives the children at a moderate charge of Rumbold’s Farm, Mitcham, a home founded by and still under her management.

The archivists at Great Ormond Street Hospital said that from 1869, the Hospital for Sick Children had its own convalescent home at Cromwell house in Highgate, but prior to that, after opening in 1852, they used the Mitcham home run by Lady Harding and another private home in Brighton. From 1927-83 the hospital had a larger ‘Country Branch’ further out in Surrey at Tadworth Court, which continues to operate today as a charitable trust providing respite care services for children.

Morning Post – Monday 22 July 1861 via British Newspaper Archive

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 28 March 1885 – via British Newspaper Archive

Text of ad:

OLD RUMBOLD FARM, opposite Mitcham Junction Station. Mitcham Common.—For Sale, useful old Building Materials, 12,000 plain tiles, window sashes. six cucumber frames, large copper and furnace, large kitchener, 5-ft. wide, nearly new; also capital American cooking range. 4-ft. wide, nearly new, pump with lead pipe, taps attached, with apparatus for supplying bath or high service, quantity of firewood, &c.

Tom Francis took a photo of the farmhouse, which can be seen on Merton Memories.

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Glebe Path

Road that runs northwards off of the north side of Lower Green West.

The houses were probably built in 1929 or later by Isaac Wilson. The title deeds for one of the houses up for auction in February 2017 show that he bought the land on 10th November, 1928.

A Conveyance of the land in this title and other land dated 10 November 1928 made between (1) The Revd. Charles Aubrey Finch (the Incumbent) (2) The Governors of the Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of the Maintenance of the Poor Clergy (3) Cyril Forster Bishop of Southwark (4) The Revd. Alard Charles De Bourvel (5) Randall Thomas Archbishop of Canterbury and (6) Isaac Henry Wilson (Purchaser)

On this 1867 OS map a path is shown across ‘glebe’ fields to the Glebelands house. These fields had been bought in the 18th century using the Queen Anne’s Bounty, which was a scheme for providing an income to the local clergy.

1867 OS map

1867 OS map

This 1910 OS map shows a road called Glebe Path, the row of houses on the left in Lower Green West is Preshaw Crescent, and the separate houses on the right were called Glebe Villas.

1910 OS map

1910 OS map

The OS map for 1953 shows the houses in this road. On the western, left hand side, going north, is a detached house, then a pair of houses before the junction with Russell Road which runs westward. North of Russell Road is a terrace of eight houses. On the eastern, or right hand side, the map shows a terrace of seven houses north of the junction with Russell Road opposite. At the north end of Glebe Path, the road turns right into Queen Annes Gardens.

1953 OS Map

1953 OS Map

Aerial photos

west side

west side

west side after Russell Road

west side after Russell Road

east side

east side

After the old people’s housing of Glebe Square had been built, an attempt in 1960 to renumber all the properties in Glebe Path was made by Mitcham Council, but the homeowners in the road protested. See Seven Defy The Council.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Queen Anne’s Bounty

To help with the income of poor clergy, the Queen Anne’s Bounty was a sum of money used to buy land. This land was then rented out and this rental income was used to support the clergy.

In 1734, £200 of this Royal Bounty was used to buy an area of land from Charles Dubois in Mitcham, to support the vicar at the parish church.

Source: An Account of the Augmentation of Small Livings by “The Governors of the Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of the Maintenance of the poor Clergy” published in 1856, by Christoper Hodgson, M.A.

Source: An Account of the Augmentation of Small Livings by “The Governors of the Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of the Maintenance of the poor Clergy” published in 1856, by Christoper Hodgson, M.A.

Eric Montague, in his Mitcham Histories : 12 Church Street and Whitford Lane, page 107, said that more land was bought in 1762 from Mary Gellibrand.

This OS map of 1867 shows areas marked as ‘Glebe’. Note that the London Road was, as shown on this map, known as Whitford Lane.

1867 OS map

1867 OS map

Later, parts of this land was sold off to developers to build houses. Montague, page 108, ibid., said that in 1790 a substantial plot was sold to build a house which became Glebelands.

In the Land Registry title for a house in Preshaw Crescent for example, a conveyance was made in 1897:

A Conveyance of the land in this title and other land dated 2 September 1897 made between (1) The Reverend Frederick Wilson Clerk (the Incumbent) (2) The Governors of The Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of The Maintenance of The Poor Clergy (the Governors) (3) The Right Reverend Father in God Edward Stuart (the Ordinary) (4) Francis Charles Simpson (the Patron) (5) The Right Honourable and Most Reverend Frederick By Divine Providence Lord Archbishop of Canterbury (the Archbishop) and (6) Richard Arthur Bush (the Purchaser) contains covenants details of which are set out in the schedule of restrictive covenants hereto.

See also Queen Anne’s Bounty on wikipedia.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Grove Cottage 183 Commonside East

House, also known as Grove Cottage, on Commonside East, west of the corner with Cedars Avenue. Now demolished. Site to corner has a block of flats.

According to the London Gazette (Publication date : 15 December 1931
Issue : 33780 Page : 8077 ), the land was registered in December 1931 with H.M. Land Registry by Ellen Dorothy Bird of 1, Camomile Road, Mitcham,

The 1867 private residents directory has a Misses Ewer living at Grove Cottage, Mitcham Common.

There are three photos of this cottage, taken in 1978, on the Collage website:

alt='Image courtesy of Collage - The London Picture Library - http://collage.cityoflondon.gov.uk'


1978 Image courtesy of Collage – The London Picture Library – http://collage.cityoflondon.gov.uk

alt='Image courtesy of Collage - The London Picture Library - http://collage.cityoflondon.gov.uk'

1978 Image courtesy of Collage – The London Picture Library – http://collage.cityoflondon.gov.uk

alt='Image courtesy of Collage - The London Picture Library - http://collage.cityoflondon.gov.uk'


1978 Image courtesy of Collage – The London Picture Library – http://collage.cityoflondon.gov.uk

183 and 185 Commonside East

183 and 185 Commonside East

Harvey and Knight Floorcloth Manufacturers

The manufacture of floorcloth was related to varnish, said Eric Montague in his Mitcham Histories: 8 Phipps Bridge, page 80:

… used considerable quantities of the ‘foots’ of matured varnish, together with condensed ‘gum fumes’ and ‘black oil’, vapours involved in the making of black Japan lacquer.

A photo from 1869 by Tom Francis of the factory buildings in Morden Road, is available on Merton Memories.


Related News Articles

30th July 1910

DEATH OF MRS. HARVEY.

—On Wednesday morning the remains of the late Mrs. Harvey, mother of Mr. R. M. Harvey, organist at the Parish Church, and Mr. T. P. Harvey, manager of Harland’s Varnish Works, were interred at the Norwood Cemetery. Mrs. Harvey’s husband was a partner in the firm Harvey & Wright, floor cloth manufacturers, who used to carry on business in Morden-lane. For the last few years she lived at Brixton and the funeral took place from her residence there.

Source: http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000945/19100730/096/0005 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)