Tag Archives: Drewett

Flat Tops

Cottages that were near Tramway Terrace, on the west side of the Carshalton Road, south of Mitcham Junction station, as described by J.D. Drewett in his Memories of Mitcham, published in 1926:

Many old houses in Mitcham have disappeared — a row of old cottages stood behind the Goat Inn — only two remain. Of several old cottages on the farm lands of Messrs. Mizen, along Amoys Lane one remains. Rumbolds Farm — and many old cottages called the Flat Tops — also stood on this estate, and were demolished many years ago. The site of Tramway Terrace was an open garden with only one small cottage at the entrance to Amoys Lane. There was a small pond in front of the Flat Tops, and two wells in the gardens. The railway to Croydon crossed the road level, and had a small cottage for the gatekeeper’s use.

1867 OS map


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

1930 : Reburial of bodies from Zion Chapel

From the Norwood News – Friday 11 April 1930, via the British Newspaper Archive.

80 BODIES BEING RE-BURIED.

The Closing of a Mitcham Cemetery.

SECOND COMMITTAL SERVICE.

A somewhat gruesome business has been started upon this week at the burial ground of Zion Congregational Chapel, Western-road, Mitcham.

Owing to the sale of the property, it became necessary to remove the human remains interred in the old burial ground. There are about 86 bodies buried in the graveyard, dating back to a hundred years ago, when the chapel was founded. A licence from the Secretary of State for the Home Department was required for the removal of the remains, and this having been obtained, the work of removing the human remains, monuments, and tombstones from the burial ground commenced on Monday.

HOW IT IS DONE.

Mr. Donald S. Drewett, undertaker, of Upper Green, Mitcham, was given the task, and with an efficient staff of workmen carried out the task very expeditiously and reverently.

Canvas awning is erected around the graves, and the operations of the diggers is hidden from the public gaze. The strictest privacy is maintained, and only the medical officer’s representative and the Mitcham Council’s chief sanitary inspector, along with the minister (Rev. T. King), are allowed in the grounds during the operations.

Liberty was afforded the relatives of any deceased person, whose remains it was proposed to remove, to undertake themselves the removal of such remains, and a few availed themselves of the privilege; but the removal and re-interment are being carried out by the same workmen.

A SECOND SERVICE.

Large shells, or coffins, six feet long, are being utilised for the removal of the remains, and these are being conveyed in the undertaker’s van and re-interred in the Council’s new burial ground, London-road, where the Rev. T. King has conducted a second committal service, the reburial being a very reverent and solemn affair.

A gravedigger told our representative : ” The work is proceeding without much ado, except that we are screened off from the public gaze. Now and again we have met with a spring of water, and this has somewhat interfered with our operations a little. Most of the coffins fall to dust soon after they are exposed to the air. We collect the bones and put them carefully into new shells or coffins. A plan of the burial ground shows the positions of the graves and the monuments, and the names of the buried persons, as far as they can be ascertained, are kept as a record. The monuments and tombstones are being pulled down, and will be re-erected in the new cemetery. Every care is being taken that the remains are reinterred and the monuments re-erected in a manner that will give no offence to anybody.”

Bryant Carton Co. Ltd.

320 – 360 Church Road
Merton, SW19

1952 OS map

According to the 1963 Borough of Mitcham List of Factories, it made cardboard boxes and was trading as The Metal Box Co. Ltd.

However a relative of one of the staff at the company in the post-WW2 period said they made printed metal trays and containers, see comment below.

This clip from Merton Memories photo of the newly built Phipps Bridge Estate in the mid 1960s shows the carton factory on the east side of Church Road.

clip from Merton Memories photo, reference Mit_​Buildings_​57-19, copyright London Borough of Merton.

News Articles

Norwood News – Friday 26 April 1929

LADDER TRAGEDY
CARPENTER FOUND AT BOTTOM.
SAD INQUEST STORY

An accidental fall at his work led to the death of Alfred Frederick Herbert Payn (41), carpenter, of Lyveden road, Tooting Junction. At the inquest on Tuesday at Mitcham, the widow, Mrs. Lilian Payn said her husband was subject to epileptic fits. He had them occasionally but invariably had a few days’ warning before hand, and stayed at home until he was better. He left home on Saturday, apparently in good health to go to his work at the Bryant Carton Works, Church-road, Mitcham.

WORKMATE’S STORY.

William Henry Drewett, of Seaton-road, Mitcham, said he was at the works on Saturday morning. He saw Payn going up a step-ladder to do a job. About three-quarters of an hour later witness heard some groaning, and found Payn lying on the floor at the bottom of the steps. He had evidently fallen down the ladder, and was holding a mallet and chisel in his hands.

Wm. Batty, the foreman, said they were building an extension to the factory. Payn was doing a bit of carpentry, and had to use a pair of steps for the purpose. Witness saw him start work that morning, and he appeared in good health. Drewett called witness’s attention to him lying un conscious at the bottom of the steps. Witness sent for the ambulance, and he was taken to Wilson Hospital.

LACERATED BRAIN.

Dr. Edith Bowie, of Streatham-road. Mitcham, said she was also on the staff of Wilson Hospital. She was there when Payn was admitted on Saturday morning. He had a bruise on the right side of the head and laceration of the brain, which had set up hemorrhage. Evidently the man had fallen on his head, for there was no other injury.

The Coroner : You could not tell whether he had a fit or not before? Dr. Bowie : No, not from what I saw.

The Coroner recorded a verdict of “Accidental death.”

Norwood News – Friday 13 August 1943

Brooker – Lord

A bride and bridegroom who first met while serving on a gun site in Scotland, with the A.T.S. and Royal Artillery respectively, were married on Saturday at Mitcham Parish Church, the Rev. G. S. Lubbock officiating.

They were Miss Eileen Joyce Lord, youngest daughter of Mrs. Lord and the late Mr. E. F. Lord, Church-road, Mitcham, and Bdr. Brian Cecil Brooker, R.A., eldest son of Mrs. Laross and the late Mr. Brooker, Chartram-road, South Norwood.

The bride was given away by Mr. T. Burnell, and looked charming in a gown of crepe, in a pastel shade of blue, with a navy hat and accessories. She carried a bouquet of pink and white carnations.

Her sister, Mrs. G. E. Button, acted as matron or honour, wearing a blue floral dress of crepe and a black hat. The bridegroom’s brother, Sgt. Victor Brooker, R.A., was best man.

A reception was held at the bride’s home. Before joining the A.T.S. she was a popular member of the staff of the Bryant Carton Manufacturing Company, where she had worked for seven years. Her late father was well known as a bus driver.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

1846 death of physic gardener William Newman

FATAL ACCIDENT AT MERTON

A painful sensation has been occasioned in the village of Mitcham, Tooting, and Merton, by the death of Mr William Newman, of Mitcham, the well-known medical herb-grower.

On Tuesday morning, about 8 o’clock, some men in the employ of Mr B. Drewett, of Lower Tooting, were at work in a field near the single gate, at Merton, when they heard the smothered report of a gun. About 11 o’clock, business calling them to the farther end of the field, they perceived the body of a respectably dressed man lying across a ditch, with a recently discharged fowling-piece lying by his side.

The roof of the right side of his skull was blown completely off just above the ear, and the brains lay in the ditch a few inches apart from his head.

The men immediately procured assistance, and conveyed the deceased, who was recognized as Mr Newman, to the Victory Inn, Merton-lane.

It appeared that the deceased had left home early in the morning to shoot over his fields, and from the position in which the body was found, there is no doubt that whilst he was in the act of leaping the ditch, which is six feet wide, his foot slipped, and as he fell the trigger caught the hedge, and in a moment the deceased was hurried into eternity.

The deceased was 62 years of age, and has left a numerous family well provided for.

An inquest was held yesterday upon the body by Mr Carter, and a verdict of ‘Accidental Death’ returned.

An inquest was held on 3rd December 1846: cause of death Accidental Death

Source: Morning Advertiser – Thursday 03 December 1846 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

Killick’s Road

Also known as Killick’s Lane, later named St Mark’s Road.

Plans noted at Croydon Local Studies Centre, Croydon Library:

4/4/1895:
– additions to Killick’s Lane Board School

17/10/1895:
– Mr JD Drewett to erect two cottages in Killick’s Road


From the minutes of the
Croydon Rural District Council
Roads and Buildings Committee
Volume VIII 1902 – 1903
21st June 1902
page 217

2. Deposited Plans. – The Buildings Sub-Committee reported that they had carefully examined al the plans of new streets and buildings deposited since the last meeting, and on their recommendation, it was Resolved:-
(a) That the undermentioned be approved:

No. 2148, Mizen F. & G., Stabling, Killick’s Road, Mitcham


Minutes of meetings held by the Croydon Rural District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

Meeting of the Surrey County Council reported in 1928 after his death.

THE LATE COUNCILLOR DREWETT

Referring to the death of Mr. J. Drewett, one of the members for Mitcham, the Chairman says he was sure they would all share his regret that a member of the Council who was present with them at their last meeting was not there that day. Mr. Drewett had been a member of the Council from 1916 to 1926. After a period of retirement, he came back in March last. He was a member of several committees, was exceedingly active in connection with local matters at Mitcham, and altogether did a tremendous amount of work.

A vote of condolence with the relatives was passed.

Source: Surrey Mirror – Friday 16 November 1928 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)