Tag Archives: London Road Cemetery

Pilot Officer Alfred Robert William Milne

Pilot Officer Alfred Robert William Milne, of the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
618 Squadron, died on 11th October 1944, aged 22, in a training flight over the North York Moors. He died along with Warrant Officer Eric Stubbs, who came from Guildford, Surrey.

Their remains were discovered on a farm near Chop Gate, North Yorkshire, in March 2020. A police investigation was launched to identify the remains, which were returned to their families. In August 2021 they were given a military funeral. This was reported in the national press and covered by ITV.

The Commonwealth War Grave Commission website states that a memorial to Pilot Officer Milne is in the London Road Cemetery, Mitcham, in plot 14, grave 8633.

Alfred Milne’s parents, Alfred Charles and Daisy Milne, lived at no. 96 Lammas Avenue according to the 1939 electoral register. The details of his will show that he and his wife were at the same address. They had married in July 1943.

MILNE, Alfred Robert William, of 96 Lammas-avenue, Mitcham, Surrey, died 11 October 1944, on war service.

Administration Llandudno
5 April 1945

to Gwendolen Margaret Milne widow.

Effects £86 19s. 1d.

From the UK, World War II Index to Allied Airmen Roll of Honour, 1939-1945 on Ancestry:

Flew into a hill near Bransdale, Yorks in low cloud during a transit flight from Warboys to Turnberry while carrying a highball bomb.

His death was reported on the front page of the 3rd November 1944 issue of the Mitcham News & Mercury, although they gave his rank as Warrant Officer.

KILLED IN A PLANE CRASH

After Completing Tour of “ Ops ”

ANOTHER old boy of Western-road School is this week reported to have been killed on service. He was Warrant Officer Alfred R. W. Milne (aged 22), eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. A. T. C. Milne, Lammas-avenue, Mitcham, who was killed in a plane crash in Yorkshire.

W.O. Milne, who married Miss Gwendoline Oliver, Lavender-avenue, Mitcham, a year ago last July, had just completed his tour of “ops.” Among his friends was Ken Pile, also an old boy of Western-road, who, as reported recently in the “News and Mercury” has just been awarded the D.F.M.

Before volunteering at the outbreak of war, W.O. Milne was a postman at the South-West London District Office. He spent eighteen months training in Canada, and returned to this country to serve with Coastal Command.

He was a member of the First Mitcham Group of Boy Scouts.

Ken Pile was also killed in a flying accident, in March 1945.

Framfield Road

Framfield Road is off the west side of Streatham Road opposite The Driftway. It leads into St James’s Road. The reason for the name is unknown, however next to it is Uckfield Grove, and the town of Uckfield in Sussex has a town of Framfield two miles to the east of it.

Possibly built around 1928 as in that year mortgages were provided by the Mitcham Urban District Council, under the Small Dwellings Acquisitions Act, for houses valued at £625 each.

As approached from the Streatham Road end, the houses on the left are arranged in blocks of six, numbered odd from 1 to 107. On the right side the houses are numbered even from 2 to 88. Extra houses were built on plots near the St James’s Road end that had garages. A number of houses have since been divided into flats.

The Royal Mail website says that there three postcodes in use in this road, namely CR4 2AL, 2AU and 2AW.


News Items

From the Manchester Evening News – Monday 11th January 1943, via the British Newspaper Archive

Home Guard Fell in River At Night

While two Home Guards were patrolling on the Thames quayside at Wandsworth, one of them, William Edward Field (41), of Framfield Road, Mitcham, fell into the river in the darkness and was drowned.

At the Battersea inquest to-day the Coroner (Mr. Hervey Wyatt) recorded a verdict of accidental death. He said that Field’s companion, Ernest William Horsman, who climbed down a wire and made two unsuccessful rescue attempts, had every reason to congratulate himself on his fine effort to help his friend.

According to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission entry for W.E. FIELD, he was in the 52nd County of London (Wandsworth Gas Co.) Battalion of the Home Guard. He was the son of Edward and Daisy Field, of Mitcham and husband of Elsie Catherine Field, of Mitcham. Although his grave is in the London Road Cemetery, it is not in the ‘War Graves’ section that has the graves of the local Home Guard that died in 1941. It is in plot 9, which is near the Victoria Road entrance.

Edward Pullen gets MBE in 1961 but missed DCM in 1916