Tag Archives: 1875

District Chapelry of Christ Church

The creation of the parish of Christ Church (later called Christchurch) as described in the London Gazette, 10th August 1875, pages 9 and 10

At the Court at Osborne House, Isle of Wight, the 5th day of August, 1875.

PRESENT,

The QUEEN’s Most Excellent Majesty in Council.

WHEREAS the Ecclesiastical Commissioners for England have, in pursuance of the Act of the fifty-ninth year of His Majesty King George the Third, chapter one hundred and thirty- four; of the Act of the second and third years of Her Majesty, chapter forty-nine; and of the Act of the nineteenth and twentieth years of Her Majesty, chapter fifty-five, duly prepared and laid before Her Majesty in Council a representation, bearing date the fifteenth day of July, in the year one thousand eight hundred and seventy-five, in the words and figures following ; that is to say,

” We, the Ecclesiastical Commissioners for England, in pursuance of the Act of the fifty-ninth year of His Majesty King George the Third, chapter one hundred and thirty-four; of the Act of the second and third years of your Majesty, chapter forty-nine; and of the Act of the nine- teenth and twentieth years of your Majesty, chapter fifty-five, have prepared, and now humbly lay before your Majesty in Council, the following representation as to the assignment of a district chapelry to the consecrated church called Christ Church situate within the limits of the parish of Mitcham in the county of Surrey and in the diocese of Winchester

“Whereas it appears to us to be expedient that a district chapelry should be assigned to the said church called Christ Church situate within the limits of the parish of Mitcham as aforesaid.

“Now, therefore, with the consent of the Right Reverend Edward Harold Bishop of the said diocese of Wincheter (testified by his having signed and sealed this representation), we, the said Ecclesiastical Commissioners, humbly represent, that it would, in our opinion, be expedient that all that part of the said parish of Mitcham which is described in the schedule hereunder written, all which part, together with the boundaries thereof, is delineated and set forth on the map or plan hereunto annexed, should be assigned as a district chapelry to the said church called Christ Church situate within the limits of such parish as aforesaid, and that the same should be named ‘ The District Chapelry of Christ Church Mitcham.’

” And, with the like consent of the said Edward Harold Bishop of the said diocese of Winchester (testified as aforesaid), we, the said Ecclesiastical Commissioners, further represent that it appears to us to-be expedient that banns of matrimony should be published, and that marriages, baptisms, churchings and burials should be solemnized or performed at such church, and that the fees to be received in respect of the publication of such banns and of the solemnization or performance of the said offices should be paid and belong to the minister of the same church for the time being: Provided always, that nothing herein contained shall be Construed as expressing .any intention on the part of us the said Commissioners to concur in or approve the taking of any fee for the per forraance of the said office of baptism or for the registration thereof,

“We, therefore, humbly pray that your Majesty will be graciously pleased to take, the premises into your Royal consideration, and to make such Order with respect thereto as to your Majesty, in your Royal wisdom, shall seem meet.

“The SCHEDULE to which the foregoing

Representation has reference.

“The District Chapelry of Christ Church, Mitcham, being ;—

“All that part of the parish of Mitcham in the county of Surrey and in the diocese of Winchester which is bounded on the east by the new parish of Emmanuel Streatham on the north partly by the parish of Streatham and partly by the parish of Saint Nicholas Tooting—otherwise called or known as Tooting Graveney—all in the said county of Surrey and in the diocese of Winchester aforesaid on the west partly by the district chapelry of the Holy Trinity South Wimbledon in the said county of Surrey and in the diocese of London and partly by the parish or parochial chapelry of Saint Mary Merton in the said county of Surrey and in the diocese of Winchester aforesaid and upon the remaining side that is to say on the south by an imaginary line commencing on the boundary which divides the said parish or parochial chapelry of Saint Mary Merton from the parish of Mitcham aforesaid at a point distant two hundred and twenty-seven yards or thereabouts due north of such point being in the centre of the bridge which carries the footway leading from a certain house into ‘Phipp’s Bridge-road’ over the stream or watercourse which flows along the north-western side of the said road into the River Wandle and extending thence eastward for a distance of twenty yards or to its junction with Phipps Bridge-road aforesaid and extending thence north-eastward for a distance of ten yards or thereabouts along the middle of the last-named road to a point opposite to a boundary stone inscribed ‘ M.Ch : Ch : D. C. 1875 No. 1’ and placed, on the eastern side of the said road over the culvert which carries the watercourse which forms the northern and eastern boundary of the buildings and premises called or known, in one part as Homefield and in the other part as Harland’s Varnish Manufactory and extending thence eastward to such boundary stone and continuing thence for a distance of nine and a half chains or thereabouts first eastward and then southward along the, middle of the last-described stream or watercourse to a point opposite to the middle of the western end of the roadway which leads past the northern side of the rows of houses called or known respectively as Hope Cottages and as Aberdeen-terrace, into Church-road and extending thence eastward along the middle of the said roadway to its junction with Church-road aforesaid and continuing thence still eastward across the last-named road to a boundary stone inscribed ‘M. Ch : Ch.: D. C. 1875, No. 2’ and placed on the eastern side of the same road immediately opposite to the-middle of the above-described roadway and continuing thence still eastward and in a direct line for a distance of nearly a quarter of a mile to a boundary stone inscribed ‘M. Ch : Ch : D.C. 1875, No. 3’ and placed on the south-western side of Merton-lane opposite to the middle of the south-western end of the cart or occupation road which leads through the farmyard attached to Manor House to the southern end of the common land called or known as Figges Marsh and extending thence, that is from the last-mentioned boundary stone north-eastward and in a direct line for a distance of forty-nine chains or thereabouts to the mile stone indicating a distance of seven and a half miles from Whitehall and of eight miles from the Royal Exchange and placed on the western side of the high road from London to Mitcham and extending thence first eastward to a point in the middle of the said high road and then southward for a distance of thirty-one chains or thereabouts along the middle of the same high road to the point at the southern end of Figges Marsh aforesaid where the same high road is joined by Streatham-lane and extending thence north-eastward for a distance of thirty-two chains or thereabouts along the middle of the last named lane to a point opposite to a boundary stone inscribed ‘ M. Ch : Ch : D. C. 1875, No. 4’ and placed on the south-eastern side of the same lane nearly opposite to the south-eastern end of the occupation roadway leading to the house called or known as Gorringe Park at the north-western end of the line of fences which divides the closes numbered respectively 181, 180, 217, 218, and the occupation road leading to the house called or known as Lonesome upon the map of the ordnance survey of the said parish of hereunto annexed from the closes numbered respectively 185, 214, 215, and 216 upon the same maps and extending thence south-eastward to such boundary stone and continuing thence generally in the same direction for a distance of twenty four chains or thereabouts along the said line of fences (crossing the line of the Peckham and Sutton Branch of the London Brighton and South Coast Railway) to a boundary stone inscribed ‘ M. Ch : Ch : D. C. 1875, No. : 5 ‘ and placed at a leads to the house called or known as Lonesome, as aforesaid, such point being at the south-eastern end of the same line of fences and being also upon the boundary which divides the said parish of Mitcham from the new parish of Emmanuel Streatham aforesaid and also all. that detached part’ of the said parish of Mitcham which is situate on the southern side, of the road leading from Merton-road to Lambeth Cemetery and-which is bounded on all sides by the parish of Saint Nicholas Tooting otherwise called or known as Tooting Graveney.”

And whereas the said representation has been approved by Her Majesty in Council; now, therefore, Her Majesty, by and with the advice of Her said Council, is pleased hereby to ratify the said representation, and to order and direct that the same and every part thereof shall be effectual in law immediately from and after the time when this Order shall have been duly published in the London Gazette, pursuant to the said Acts ; and Her Majesty, by and with the like advice, is pleased hereby to direct that this Order be forthwith registered by the Registrar of the said diocese of Winchester.

C. L. Peel

Hooper’s Telegraph Works

News Stories

Morning Advertiser – Wednesday 16 February 1870

HOOPER'S TELEGRAPH WORKS (Limited). 

Incorporated under the Companies Acts, 1862 and 1867. Capital, £250,000, in shares of £10 each, payable as follows:-

    £1 per Share on Application. 
    £2     "        Allotment.
    £2     "        1st April, 1870. 
    £2     "        1st June, 1870. 
    £1     "        1st August, 1870. 

              Directors. 

        John Dunlop. Esq. 
        Hon. L. Agar-Ellis, M.P. 
        C. Seymour Grenfell, Esq. 
        William Hooper, Esq., Managing Director. 
        Frederic Lubbock, Esq. 
        Admiral Sir Wm. Wiseman, Bart.  

             Bankers

        Messrs. Robarts, Lubbock, and Co. 
        Bank of Scotland (Edinburgh and Branches). 

             Solicitors. 

        Messrs. Ashurst, Morris, and Co. 

Temporary Offices:- No. 114, Gresham House, Old Broadstreet, E.C. 

This Company has been formed to takeover and the well-known works of Mr. William Hooper, for the manufacture of Indiarubber Core for Telegraphic purpose, and add thereto the business of Covering the Core for Submarine Cables, and sub-merging and maintaining the same, whereby the Company will enabled execute the largest contracts for the manufacture of Submarine and Land Telegraphs. 

The value Mr. Hooper's process for the manufacture of Core is now fully recognised. He has successfully carried on his present business, and with a comparatively small capital has made vary large profits, sufficient to ensure out of that branch of the alone a handsome return on the whole capital of the Company; and when the other branches have been added, it is but fair conclude that the profits this undertaking will favourably compare with those of the existing Companies. 

Mr. Hooper has already manufactured according to his process the Cores for the following Cables, all which are in  perfect working order, viz.: 

       Ceylon to the Mainland of India. 
       The Persian Gulf Cable, laid last year by the Indian Government.
       England to Denmark. 
       Danish-Russian Cable (one section). 
       Scotland to Norway 
       Sweden to Russia. 

Besides upwards of 500 miles laid in various parts of India, Brazil, Australia, &c. Mr Latimer Clark, while engaged as Engineer and  Electrician to the Indian Government, in a letter addressed to Mr. Hooper from Bombay, so recently as the 18th October, 1869, says, in  reference to a Cable submerged in the Persian Gulf: - 

   “We have been examining, and I am bringing home a specimen of the very first sample Core which you sent out in 1863 to the Persian Gulf, and which has had no special care taken of it; it is as perfect as when it first left England, and can in no way be distinguished from a new sample fresh out of the factory.” 

The Company, while possessed of the exclusive right use Mr. Hooper's process for the manufacture of Indiarubber Core, will be prepared to contract for Cables with Guttapercha Core. 

Mr. Hooper has contracted with the Great Northern Telegraph China and Japan Extension Company for the manufacture of their cables, 2,300 miles in length, for £896,000; and it is one of the terms of the agreement between Mr. Hooper and the Company that two-thirds of all profits from this contract shall belong to this Company, which will thus enter on actual and highly remunerative operations at once. Mr Hooper has already made considerable progress with this contract. Mr. Hooper’s works at Mitcham, which are capable of executing large contracts for Core, will be taken over for £65,000. Mr. Hooper’s consideration for Patents and Goodwill will be entirely contingent on the success of the Company, and consists of one-half the net profits of year, after 7 1/2 per cent per annum had  first been paid to the Shareholders. At the end of 10 years the whole the profits will accrue to the Company. 

Copies of the Articles of Association and of the Agreement with Mr. Hooper can be seen at the Offices of the Solicitors of the Company.

Applications for Shares, in the form annexed, accompanied by a deposit of £1 per Share, can be left with the Bankers of the Company.Deposits will be received at any of the Branches of the Bank of Scotland. If no Allotment is made the Deposit will be returned in full. 

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 21 June 1873

MITCHAM.
“The Hooper.”

—It may, perhaps, be interesting to our readers to know that the Hooper Telegraph Company (limited), whose extensive works are at Mitcham, have had a vessel built bearing the above name, the first ever constructed entirely for telegraph purposes, and embracing every improvement in the paying out machinery and appliances for picking up a damaged or lost cable, which experience up to the present time has suggested. She is 350 feet in length, 55 feet beam, 35 feet in depth, and of 5,000 tons register, with engines of 400 nominal horsepower, working up to 2,000, and realises a speed of 10.5 knots an hour. She has taken in 1,500 miles of cable from the Hooper Works, at Millwall, belonging to the Western Telegraph Company, which is about to lay 2,500 miles of cable along the east coast of South America, which left on Saturday. After coaling and taking in stores at Plymouth the Hooper will sail direct for Pernambuco.

This Cable Ship was later renamed the Silvertown, see History of the Atlantic Cable


Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 19 June 1875

MITCHAM.
Presentation to Mr. John P. Hooper.

—On Saturday, the 12th instant, pleasing ceremony took place at the offices of Hooper’s Telegraph Works Limited,” 31, Lombard-street, E.C., the occasion being the presentation of a handsome epergne and dessert stands to Mr. John Hooper in anticipation of his wedding, which announce in another portion of our journal as having taken place on Wednesday last. The epergne and stands, which were the work of Messrs. Elkington and Co., bore a suitable inscription, stating them to be the gift of the officers and workpeople of Hooper’s Telegraph Works, Limited, at Millwall, Mitcham, West Ham, Lombard-street, and of the cable steamship Hooper, with whom Mr. John Hooper now holds the chief position. The presentation was made on behalf of those assembled by Mr. A. Maclachlan, for many years connected with Hooper’s Telegraph Works, who in addressing Mr. John Hooper, said—

“I have been requested to undertake the pleasing duty of presenting to you on the occasion of your wedding this testimonial on behalf of those so long associated with you in connection with Hooper’s Telegraph Works, Limited, at Millwall, Mitcham, West Ham, and Lombard-street, and of the officers of the cable steamship ‘Hooper.’ This duty is the more pleasing because it gives me the opportunity of expressing in the name of those thus connected with you the high respect and esteem in which you are held by them. I know that ever since your first connection with our works you have always merited and possessed the cordial respect and affection of all who have the good fortune to be associated with you. In begging your acceptance of this testimonial, we heartily wish you every happiness in your married life, and that you may live long to enjoy the comforts of your own home.”

In reply to Mr. Maclachlan, Mr. John Hooper said —

“I am sure I thank you each and all for your kindness in presenting me with this handsome testimonial. I need scarcely that I shall always bear in mind the good feeling and good fellowship which must exist between us, as evinced by your present, and while such good fellowship does exist, I am certain that all our undertakings will prosper. I have doubt that if those connected with the three factories and with our ships, coupled with those working at Lombard-street, are prepared to pull together as heretofore, our present undertakings will be as successful as the past. I am sure it is most handsome on your part to present me with such a gift and I can only say again that I thank you each and all very much.”


Sussex Agricultural Express – Saturday 20 October 1888

MITCHAM, SURREY.

MESSRS. BLAKE. HADDOCK, & CARPENTER WILL SELL BY AUCTION, at the Mart, Tokenhouse-yard, City, E.C., on WEDNESDAY, 7th November, Two o’clock precisely, by direction of the trustees under the will of the late James Bridger, Esq., the valuable and important MANOR of BIGGIN and TAMWORTH, with the quit rents, fines, heriots, &c., extending over large area, and including the Fair Green. Also, nine acres of capital MARKET GARDEN GROUND. A compact property fronting the two greens. Also, four FREEHOLD GROUND RENTS, amounting to £29 5s. per annum, the important PROPERTY of HOOPER’S TELEGRAPH WORKS, occupying an area of four acres on Mitcham Common, and let at £225 per annum. Particulars and conditions of sale, with plan, may had of J. Penfold, Esq.. Solicitor, 21, John-street, Bedford-row, W.C, ; Mr R. M. Chart, Surveyor. Lower Mitcham; and at the At Auctioneers’ Offices, 45, High-Street, Croydon. Note.—At the same time will be sold other Property at Croydon and elsewhere.


Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 24 September 1898

MITCHAM.

Messrs. BLAKE & CARPENTER Will Sell by Auction, at the King’s Head, Mitcham, Monday. October 17th, at Six o’clock the evening, 1 FREEHOLD COTTAGE PROPERTY, known as Hooper’s Cottages, situate at Commonside East, Mitcham, the annual rental value of £49 10s. Particulars and conditions of sale may be had of the Solicitors, Messrs. Andrew and Cheale. Tunbridge Wells ; R. M. Chart, Esq., Mitcham ; and of the Auctioneers, 45, High Street, Croydon.

Lock’s Lane

Road that runs south-eastwards from junctions with Streatham Road and London Road, twoards Eastfields Road. It was named after Lock’s Farm, at the Figges Marsh end, according to J.D. Drewett, in his ‘Memories of Old Mitcham’.

In this OS map from 1893, the part now called Eastfields Road is shown as Tamworth Lane:

1893 OS map

The 1952 OS map shows the marzipan factory of John F. Renshaw & Co., Ltd.

1952 OS Map

References in Newspapers

West London Observer – Saturday 30 April 1887

WANTED, by a Respectable Young Man, regular employment of any kind ; not with horses.— Apply, W. B., 11, Lock’s Lane, Mitcham.

World War 1 Connections
Private William Henry Tricker

Rev D.F. Wilson

Mitcham Parish vicar from 19th July 1859 to ??????

Clip of Rev Wilson and his wife from Merton Memories photo 49808 17th July 1909. Copyright London Borough of Merton.

Clip of Rev Wilson and his wife from Merton Memories photo 49808 17th July 1909. Copyright London Borough of Merton.

CANON KEEPS GOLDEN WEDDING VICAR OF MITCHAM 55 YEARS.

The Rev. D. F. Wilson, for the past 55 years vicar of Mitcham. and Mrs. Wilson celebrated their golden wedding on Tuesday. Mr Wilson is in his 84th year and both he and Mrs. Wilson are in very good health. Mr. Wilson still conducts the chief services, and social activities of his large parish. He is the chairman of the school managers, and is seldom absent from the meetings.

Canon Wilson became vicar of Mitcham in 1859, and when in July, 1909 he celebrated his jubilee all Mitcham united to do him honour. He has held the living longer than any of his predecessors, 45 in number, though two of them held it 45 years. The church was founded in 1291.

Canon Wilson has seen the population grow from 4,000 to 31,000, and three new churches built. He has also baptised the grandchildren of men whom he baptised in the same church.

Source: Gloucestershire Echo – Wednesday 28 January 1914 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

Merton Memories photos

Collingsby Caricatures
Rev Wilson
c. 1875
1909 the 50th anniversary as parish vicar

Dr Thomas Hamilton

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 13 March 1875

Lamented Death.

—We regret to announce this week the death of T. W. Hamilton, Esq., M.D., which occurred at his residence at Mitcham, on Sunday last, at the age of 54 years, and after a short illness. The funeral took place on Wednesday last, at Mitcham churchyard, the deceased gentleman’s remains being conveyed to the grave members of the police force. The Oddfellows were represented in the churchyard, and a large number of parishioners were also present for the purpose of testifying their respect for the deceased. The service having been performed the Rev. D. F. Wilson, the vicar, the body was consigned to its last resting place, the grave. Dr. Hamilton was for many years the principal medical practitioner in Mitcham, and his death has occasioned universal regret amongst all classes. Perhaps his loss will be felt most keenly by the poor, to whom he was endeared by many acts of kindness and benevolence, and with whom his memory will be ever sacred.

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 28 October 1876

A second meeting of the promoters of the Hamilton Memorial Fund was held at Dr. Smith’s schoolroom, Upper Mitcham, on Thursday, the 19th inst, when communication from the vicar, Rev. D. F. Wilson, was read, suggesting that it should take the form of a stained window in the church, and an offer assisting liberally in raising additional subscriptions, but it was considered, after lengthened conversation, that the fund hitherto collected could not diverted from its purpose, namely to place a stone over the remains of the deceased doctor in the churchyard. A design in granite was then selected, at about the cost of and order given to Mr. R. Chart to erect it without delay.