Tag Archives: Harland

District Chapelry of Christ Church

The creation of the parish of Christ Church (later called Christchurch) as described in the London Gazette, 10th August 1875, pages 9 and 10

At the Court at Osborne House, Isle of Wight, the 5th day of August, 1875.

PRESENT,

The QUEEN’s Most Excellent Majesty in Council.

WHEREAS the Ecclesiastical Commissioners for England have, in pursuance of the Act of the fifty-ninth year of His Majesty King George the Third, chapter one hundred and thirty- four; of the Act of the second and third years of Her Majesty, chapter forty-nine; and of the Act of the nineteenth and twentieth years of Her Majesty, chapter fifty-five, duly prepared and laid before Her Majesty in Council a representation, bearing date the fifteenth day of July, in the year one thousand eight hundred and seventy-five, in the words and figures following ; that is to say,

” We, the Ecclesiastical Commissioners for England, in pursuance of the Act of the fifty-ninth year of His Majesty King George the Third, chapter one hundred and thirty-four; of the Act of the second and third years of your Majesty, chapter forty-nine; and of the Act of the nine- teenth and twentieth years of your Majesty, chapter fifty-five, have prepared, and now humbly lay before your Majesty in Council, the following representation as to the assignment of a district chapelry to the consecrated church called Christ Church situate within the limits of the parish of Mitcham in the county of Surrey and in the diocese of Winchester

“Whereas it appears to us to be expedient that a district chapelry should be assigned to the said church called Christ Church situate within the limits of the parish of Mitcham as aforesaid.

“Now, therefore, with the consent of the Right Reverend Edward Harold Bishop of the said diocese of Wincheter (testified by his having signed and sealed this representation), we, the said Ecclesiastical Commissioners, humbly represent, that it would, in our opinion, be expedient that all that part of the said parish of Mitcham which is described in the schedule hereunder written, all which part, together with the boundaries thereof, is delineated and set forth on the map or plan hereunto annexed, should be assigned as a district chapelry to the said church called Christ Church situate within the limits of such parish as aforesaid, and that the same should be named ‘ The District Chapelry of Christ Church Mitcham.’

” And, with the like consent of the said Edward Harold Bishop of the said diocese of Winchester (testified as aforesaid), we, the said Ecclesiastical Commissioners, further represent that it appears to us to-be expedient that banns of matrimony should be published, and that marriages, baptisms, churchings and burials should be solemnized or performed at such church, and that the fees to be received in respect of the publication of such banns and of the solemnization or performance of the said offices should be paid and belong to the minister of the same church for the time being: Provided always, that nothing herein contained shall be Construed as expressing .any intention on the part of us the said Commissioners to concur in or approve the taking of any fee for the per forraance of the said office of baptism or for the registration thereof,

“We, therefore, humbly pray that your Majesty will be graciously pleased to take, the premises into your Royal consideration, and to make such Order with respect thereto as to your Majesty, in your Royal wisdom, shall seem meet.

“The SCHEDULE to which the foregoing

Representation has reference.

“The District Chapelry of Christ Church, Mitcham, being ;—

“All that part of the parish of Mitcham in the county of Surrey and in the diocese of Winchester which is bounded on the east by the new parish of Emmanuel Streatham on the north partly by the parish of Streatham and partly by the parish of Saint Nicholas Tooting—otherwise called or known as Tooting Graveney—all in the said county of Surrey and in the diocese of Winchester aforesaid on the west partly by the district chapelry of the Holy Trinity South Wimbledon in the said county of Surrey and in the diocese of London and partly by the parish or parochial chapelry of Saint Mary Merton in the said county of Surrey and in the diocese of Winchester aforesaid and upon the remaining side that is to say on the south by an imaginary line commencing on the boundary which divides the said parish or parochial chapelry of Saint Mary Merton from the parish of Mitcham aforesaid at a point distant two hundred and twenty-seven yards or thereabouts due north of such point being in the centre of the bridge which carries the footway leading from a certain house into ‘Phipp’s Bridge-road’ over the stream or watercourse which flows along the north-western side of the said road into the River Wandle and extending thence eastward for a distance of twenty yards or to its junction with Phipps Bridge-road aforesaid and extending thence north-eastward for a distance of ten yards or thereabouts along the middle of the last-named road to a point opposite to a boundary stone inscribed ‘ M.Ch : Ch : D. C. 1875 No. 1’ and placed, on the eastern side of the said road over the culvert which carries the watercourse which forms the northern and eastern boundary of the buildings and premises called or known, in one part as Homefield and in the other part as Harland’s Varnish Manufactory and extending thence eastward to such boundary stone and continuing thence for a distance of nine and a half chains or thereabouts first eastward and then southward along the, middle of the last-described stream or watercourse to a point opposite to the middle of the western end of the roadway which leads past the northern side of the rows of houses called or known respectively as Hope Cottages and as Aberdeen-terrace, into Church-road and extending thence eastward along the middle of the said roadway to its junction with Church-road aforesaid and continuing thence still eastward across the last-named road to a boundary stone inscribed ‘M. Ch : Ch.: D. C. 1875, No. 2’ and placed on the eastern side of the same road immediately opposite to the-middle of the above-described roadway and continuing thence still eastward and in a direct line for a distance of nearly a quarter of a mile to a boundary stone inscribed ‘M. Ch : Ch : D.C. 1875, No. 3’ and placed on the south-western side of Merton-lane opposite to the middle of the south-western end of the cart or occupation road which leads through the farmyard attached to Manor House to the southern end of the common land called or known as Figges Marsh and extending thence, that is from the last-mentioned boundary stone north-eastward and in a direct line for a distance of forty-nine chains or thereabouts to the mile stone indicating a distance of seven and a half miles from Whitehall and of eight miles from the Royal Exchange and placed on the western side of the high road from London to Mitcham and extending thence first eastward to a point in the middle of the said high road and then southward for a distance of thirty-one chains or thereabouts along the middle of the same high road to the point at the southern end of Figges Marsh aforesaid where the same high road is joined by Streatham-lane and extending thence north-eastward for a distance of thirty-two chains or thereabouts along the middle of the last named lane to a point opposite to a boundary stone inscribed ‘ M. Ch : Ch : D. C. 1875, No. 4’ and placed on the south-eastern side of the same lane nearly opposite to the south-eastern end of the occupation roadway leading to the house called or known as Gorringe Park at the north-western end of the line of fences which divides the closes numbered respectively 181, 180, 217, 218, and the occupation road leading to the house called or known as Lonesome upon the map of the ordnance survey of the said parish of hereunto annexed from the closes numbered respectively 185, 214, 215, and 216 upon the same maps and extending thence south-eastward to such boundary stone and continuing thence generally in the same direction for a distance of twenty four chains or thereabouts along the said line of fences (crossing the line of the Peckham and Sutton Branch of the London Brighton and South Coast Railway) to a boundary stone inscribed ‘ M. Ch : Ch : D. C. 1875, No. : 5 ‘ and placed at a leads to the house called or known as Lonesome, as aforesaid, such point being at the south-eastern end of the same line of fences and being also upon the boundary which divides the said parish of Mitcham from the new parish of Emmanuel Streatham aforesaid and also all. that detached part’ of the said parish of Mitcham which is situate on the southern side, of the road leading from Merton-road to Lambeth Cemetery and-which is bounded on all sides by the parish of Saint Nicholas Tooting otherwise called or known as Tooting Graveney.”

And whereas the said representation has been approved by Her Majesty in Council; now, therefore, Her Majesty, by and with the advice of Her said Council, is pleased hereby to ratify the said representation, and to order and direct that the same and every part thereof shall be effectual in law immediately from and after the time when this Order shall have been duly published in the London Gazette, pursuant to the said Acts ; and Her Majesty, by and with the like advice, is pleased hereby to direct that this Order be forthwith registered by the Registrar of the said diocese of Winchester.

C. L. Peel

Harvey and Knight Floorcloth Manufacturers

The manufacture of floorcloth was related to varnish, said Eric Montague in his Mitcham Histories: 8 Phipps Bridge, page 80:

… used considerable quantities of the ‘foots’ of matured varnish, together with condensed ‘gum fumes’ and ‘black oil’, vapours involved in the making of black Japan lacquer.

A photo from 1869 by Tom Francis of the factory buildings in Morden Road, is available on Merton Memories.


Related News Articles

30th July 1910

DEATH OF MRS. HARVEY.

—On Wednesday morning the remains of the late Mrs. Harvey, mother of Mr. R. M. Harvey, organist at the Parish Church, and Mr. T. P. Harvey, manager of Harland’s Varnish Works, were interred at the Norwood Cemetery. Mrs. Harvey’s husband was a partner in the firm Harvey & Wright, floor cloth manufacturers, who used to carry on business in Morden-lane. For the last few years she lived at Brixton and the funeral took place from her residence there.

Source: http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000945/19100730/096/0005 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

1939 Harry Mount Remembers 1870s Mitcham

I REMEMBER EARLY DAYS IN MITCHAM (By Mr. Harry Mount, J.P.)

In the year 1870 about the same time that Maurice Maeterlinck was beginning to study water spiders in his grandfather’s garden, and my old friend Tom Francis was beginning to sit up and take notice in what was then the centre of Mitcham, I was doing likewise on the outskirts of the village in what is at present called the Phipps Bridge Ward.

To be correct, I slept about six feet within the Merton boundary on the bank of the brook that runs from the Wandle at Phipps Bridge till it joins the river again at Merton Abbey.

The stream at that time was clear running water which was used for drinking and cooking purposes by all people on each side of the brook.

On the Merton side there were old willow trees from which old Tom Sherman, the famous Surrey bowler, obtained many a splendid cricket bat. At certain periods the river gates would be opened and the brook flooded. When the water had abated, roach, gudgeon in great numbers and a certain quantity of trout could be easily caught. A twelve years old schoolgirl on one occasion waded into the stream and scooped up a fine trout in her pinafore, and one of the clerks at Harlands, the varnish makers, gave her half a crown for it. Mr. Robert Harland spent much of his leisure time near Phipps Bridge fly-fishing for trout.

THE RAT UNDER THE TABLE

My home was what would now be called a two-roomed wooden bungalow, but was then called for postal purposes, Rose Cottage. It was known locally as Rats Castle, and it did not belie its latter name, for many a night, while I was reading by candlelight I had one eye on the book and the other on a huge water rat under the table eating the crumbs.

I ought to say that there was only my father and me living in the cottage from the time I was nine years of age.

Mitcham in 1870 contained only seven thousand inhabitants, of whom it would be safe to say that five thousand of them were unable to read a book or newspaper. The Education Act was introduced that year, but had very little effect until some years after.

I first attended school at the National School opposite the cenotaph. The only thing I remember of that time is that we boys made wooden swords, and, dividing ourselves up, fought the Franco-German War in our playtime on the green.

One of us was lucky enough to have a tin sword in a scabbard, and he was made commander-in-chief, but of which Army I now forget. I was at that school only a few months, when the “powers that were” found out that I was Mertoner and sent me to the Lower Merton Schools, near Old Merton Church.

I stayed there till I was eleven years old, and then went as tearboy for my father, who was silk handkerchief printer at Littler’s factory, which is now owned by Liberty’s.

THE BOOK OF KNOWLEDGE

I do not remember learning anything at either school, as my father had been my teacher from a very early age. He had a “Book of Useful Knowledge,” with questions and answers, opening like this: “What is the World?” “The Earth we Live On.” “Who made It?” Our Great and Good God.” “Are there not many things in you would like know about?” Yes.” “ What is Bread?” and on, with hundreds of questions, which he would set me to learn a page at a time, and then put me through it with the book in his hand. I was also fairly good at arithmetic. Newspapers were very scarce in our neighbourhood in those days. Lloyd’s Weekly and the Police News were the standard of the reading public.

One number of the latter paper I shall never forget. The Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII) had been very ill with typhoid fever, early in January. 1872, he began to recover and that week the “Police News” came out with a full page picture of the Prince’s bedchamber with a lovely female figure floating over the Prince’s bed and Old King Death with his scythe running out of the door. Underneath was the inscription :

“The Angel of Mercy at Sandringham.”

As a boy of nine it made a lasting impression on me.

Phipps Bridge was at that time truly rural district, with the exception of about six factories. There was a wide expanse of mint, peas, beans, liquorice and hay fields from Tooting Junction to Old Merton Church and from Merton High-street to Mitcham Cricket Green.

The Messrs. Littler’s were three brothers — Billy, Jimmy and Teddy. They were our employers and also our landlords and when there was no work they didn’t trouble us for rent. Billy Littler was a keen sportsman with a gun and would spend much of his leisure time shooting snipe and other birds in the fields surrounding Merton Abbey. The first job I remember doing was supplying beer (good beer at fourpence a quart) in a tin pot to the thirsty haymakers. I spent a very happy time during the years I am writing about.

My work as tearboy was to spread colour evenly on a sieve for the block to pick up and transfer it to the handkerchief.

COLOURS FROM THE COW

Littler’s supplied the world with thousands of beautiful silk handkerchiefs and I have often wondered what the owners of these would have thought had they known that the beautiful colours were obtained through a solution of cow dung!

My next job was at Butler’s floorcloth factory, now enclosed with Messrs. Harland’s works, as a tearboy at six shillings a week.

Mitcham in the early seventies, with plenty of haymaking and other work in the fields during the Summer, was a lovely place, but in Winter when the factories were slack and there was scarcely anything to do in the field, life was very different. Had it not been for the soup kitchens in Mitcham and Merton, hundreds of children would have gone hungry very often. These kitchens were supported by charitable people who would dispense tickets with which a child taking a jug with a penny could get a quart of soup. With some bread it made a good dinner for a family. An unemployed man with family would have to walk to Croydon and break a bushel of granite stones and walk back with a four pound loaf under his arm and two tickets. One of the tickets would entitle him to a piece of meat from a butcher in High-street, Merton, and the other to some grocery in Lower Mitcham.

CHEAP RENTS

Rent was fairly cheap, a four room cottage being three and ninepence a week. One reason for the low rents was that many the houses were always empty and it did not cause a man much surprise to find that his next door neighbour had flitted to another part of the village during the night

After leaving Butler’s I went to Harvey and Knight’s floorcloth factory in Morden-lane, still as a tearboy at seven shillings a week, and as my father had gone to Lancashire, calico printing, and we had disposed of our home. I had to keep myself on that amount, paying two shillings lodging and washing, and feeding and clothing myself on the remainder.

I had no relations anywhere near me. While I was at Harvey and Knight’s the Russo-Turkish War started and the man I worked with, being unable to read, used to bring “Lloyd’s News” on Monday afternoons for me to read it to him. This continued week after week until the war ended. By that time I was quite familiar with “Plevna,” “The Shipka Pass.” “General Skobeloff and “Osman Digna.”

During that time I saw Mrs. Dempsey’s cow turned out of her field and a big floorcloth and linoleum factory built there by Daniel Hayward and Son of Newington Causeway, London. I started there as the first tearboy as soon it was ready and within a few weeks was linoleum printing, which was trade for eighteen years.

AN IRISHMAN’S TIME

While there I got to know an Irishman who was foreman of the trowellers and floorhands. He possessed a watch but could only tell the time twice a day just on the stroke of six o’clock he would shout “Time, boys—upright and down straight.”

On one occasion he went into a building and shouted to the men aloft: “ How many of you up there?” “Three” came the answer. “Half of you come down,” he said.

So in 1878, dear reader. I will part company with you for the present and add that my life and motto are well summed up in the following lines:

In this world I’ve gained my knowledge
And for it I’ve had to pay,
Though I’ve never been to college
Yet I’ve heard that poets say—
Life is like a mighty river
Flowing on from day to day.
Men are vessels cast upon it
Sometimes wrecked and helpless lay;
Then do your best for one another
Making life a pleasant dream.
Help a worn-out weary brother.
Pulling hard against the stream.

Source: Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Friday 04 August 1939 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

Aberdeen Road

Road that was off west side of Church Road, about 200 yards south of junction with Western Road. It no longer exists, and was where Hogarth Crescent and Brangwyn Crescent are now.

It was listed in directories as having received letters from Wimbledon, hence was in SW19 postal district.

Listed in the 1963 List of Roads.

Maps

1893 OS map

1893 OS map

1952 OS map

1952 OS map

Notes from Council minutes
June 4th 1914 Planning permission approved for W. Harland & Sons for an oil store.

1906 Nuisances : Samuel Newberry of 41 Aberdeen Road – pigs being kept against bye-laws. (Note different spelling of surname to that in the 1925 street directory below).

In the 1925 street directory, this road was listed as ‘no throughfare’ and with houses only on the south side:

1, Robert BREWIN
3, Fred HILLSLEY
5, William James WOODS
7, Mrs SIVIOUR
9, William THOMPSON
11, Edward POCKETT
13, Henry James THORNS
15, Frank COOK
17, Mrs PEPPER
19, Edward SIGNE
21, Arthur BUCK
23, William PAYNE
39, Mrs GOODMAN
41, Samuel NEWBURY
43, Mrs PANTING
45, James BAKER
47, James ATKINS (White’s cottage)
William Harland & Son, varnish manufacturers. (works)

World War 1 Connections

From the Surrey Recruitment Registers:

Thomas Edward GOODMAN of 39 Aberdeen Road, aged 19 Years 3 Months, Boxmaker. Joined on 23 April 1915 to the East Surrey Regiment.

Chas NEWBURY of 41 Aberdeen Road, Merton Surrey, aged 19 Years 1 Months, Labourer. Joined on 19 May 1915 to the Royal West Surrey Regiment.

S J SIVIOUR of 7 Aberdeen Road, Church Rd Merton, aged 34 Years 4 Months, Gardener. Conscripted on 23 October 1916 to the Labour Corps (depot).

R TROTT of 47 Aberdeen Road, Merton, aged 23 Years 6 Months, Labourer. Conscripted on 16 October 1916 to the Huntingdonshire Cyclists (2/1st Batn).

Marriages
12th April, 1914 – William Charles GOODMAN, aged 22, varnish labourer, of 39 Aberdeen Road, father James GOODMAN (deceased), ink maker; married Eva May BLOCK, aged 21, of 17 Queens Road, father Lewis James BLOCK, labourer at the Parish Church; witnesses James GOODMAN and Alice Emma BLOCK.


Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.