Tag Archives: 1877

1877 : Methodism in Mitcham

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 22 December 1877

METHODISM AT MITCHAM

The following particulars as to the history of Methodism generally, and particularly in regard to the parish of Mitcham may be interesting to our readers. They formed the basis of lecture given by Mr. John Wade a short time since.

The term Methodism was first applied about the year 1729 to four young men at Oxford, namely, John Wesley, Charles Wesley, and two others named Morgan and Kirkham, and a year or two afterwards to Messrs. Ingham, Broughton, Clayton, Hervey, and last, not least, George Whitfield, who met together at stated times for prayer, searching the Scriptures, and mutual edification, and also devoted themselves to the visiting of the prisoners in the gaol, the sick, and the poor. This course of conduct did not fail to attract the notice of their fellow collegians, and it is recorded that one of them, a young gentleman of Christ Church, exclaimed, Here is a new set of Methodists sprung up! alluding to some ancient physicians, who were so called about 30 or 40 B.C., and the name has been applied to them or their followers ever since. They were also derisively called “Sacramentarians,” and the “Holy Club.” Many of the influential masters and doctors of the University frowned upon them, but to no purpose. It was thought desirable by the family that John Wesley should succeed his father as incumbent at Epworth, but Wesley preferred remaining at Oxford as a tutor. About April, 1735, a new colony was formed in Georgia, North America, and Mr. Wesley consented to there as chaplain. Mr. Wesley’s High Church principles some time after brought him into collision with the authorities, and he left Georgia in October, 1737. February, 1738, he arrived in London, having been absent therefrom about two years and four months, and became acquainted with the Moravians, whom he afterwards joined. He subsequently visited the Moravian settlement at Hernhut, in Moravia, and on his return to England, as he was shut out of the churches, and Whitfield commenced preaching in the open air. In July, 1740, Mr. Wesley separated from the Moravians, and established a society which met a place called “The Foundry,” which had been used for casting cannon, in Moorfields, and from this date, until his death in 1791, in the year of his age, he pursued a successful career in spreading religion through the land. The first mention of Methodism as respects Mitcham is contained in vol. 4 of Mr. Wesley’s Journal, page 117, under the date of January 12, 1764 (113 years since), where there occur the words:—

”I preached at noon at Mitcham, and in the afternoon rode to Dorking, but the gentleman to whose house I was invited seemed to have no desire that I should preach, so that evening I had nothing to do; but on the next day (Friday, Jan. 13th) I went at noon into the street, and in broad place not far from the market-house proclaimed ’The Grace of our Lord Jesus Christ.’ At first two or three little children were the whole of my congregation, but it quickly increased, though the air was sharp, and the ground exceedingly wet, and all behaved well but three or four grumbling men, who stood so far off that they disturbed none but themselves, had purposed to preach there again in the morning, but a violent storm made it impracticable, after preaching at Mitcham on the way, I rode back to London.”

Nothing appears to have arisen from this first effort of Mr. Wesley to introduce Methodism into Mitcham, until about years after, namely, on March 13th, 1776, on which date an entry occurs in his journal the effect that he went to Mitcham and found a little company just started up. The house being too small, preached the front of house adjoining the high road, where the earnestness of the people made up for the keenness of the east wind. The place where Mr. Wesley preached on this occasion was opposite the King’s Head inn, Lower Green. The next notice under the date of Nov. 6th, 1787, and records the fact that Mr. Wesley again preached at Mitcham. Steps were then taken build chapel. A piece of ground was taken on the Causeway on lease for 71 years, and the chapel was opened in November, 1789 Mr. Wesley preached in the new chapel December 1st, 1789, and Mitcham continued part of the London circuit until the year 1811, the pulpit being mostly supplied from London. After this it formed what was called the Brentford circuit, still more recently the Hammersmith circuit, and since the year 1838 part of the Croydon circuit. The lease of the old chapel having expired, a fresh site was obtained on the opposite side of Mitcham Green, near the old chapel, for years, and on this site the present new chapel has been erected at cost of about £1,100.

Early morning cricket in 1877 : the Peep o’ Days v the Early Risers

From the Croydon Advertiser of Saturday 21st July 1877, from the British Newspaper Archives, which requires a subscription.

Cricket – “Peep o’ Days” v. Early Risers.

These clubs met again on Lower Green, Mitcham, on Tuesday and Thursday mornings last, between the hours of 4 and 7, to play the return match.

The “Peep o’ Days” played (with the exception of two) the same men as in the previous match, but as the Early Risers were defeated last time, they naturally thought it advisable to take a little stringer team. But the battle is not always to the strong.

Having won the toss, the “Peeps” went to the wickets, which at first fell rather quickly, but a little stand was afterwards made by A. Turner (41), and A. Gibbard (42). The “Peeps” were soon afterwards disposed of for a total of 88 runs. The “Earlys” were soon in, but were disposed of for 49 runs.

Play being resumed on Thursday, the “Peeps” played a comfortable innings of 104. Time did not permit the “Earlys” to complete their second innings. It is hardly necessary to add thgat the game was very exciting, especially as the “Peeps” have been successful in their determination to give the “Earlys” a “drubbing.”

The game was gained by the “Peeps” as the result of the good bowling of A. Gibbard and S. Hubbard.

1877 : West Kent Drainage scheme

WEST KENT DRAINAGE SCHEME.

The members of the West Kent Main Sewerage Board on Thursday invited the parochial authorities of Bromley, Beckenham, Bexley, Crayford, Chislehurst, Dartford, and the parishes in the valley of the Cray to an official inspection of the works now in progress at Halfway-street, Eltham. The parishes named have long suffered from want of effective drainage and the means of disposing of their sewerage.

The West Kent Main Drainage Scheme was designed by Sir Joseph Bazalgette, and consists of a sewer 9 miles in length from Beckenham to an outfall in Dartford Marshes, Long Reach, 7 miles below the northern and southern outfalls. It is proposed by Sir J. Bazalgette that the main sewer should be continued from Beckenham westward by Croydon, Mitcham, Merton and Kingston and it will form the out fall for all the towns in the Thames valley. The contract drawings were prepared by Mr Alfred Williams and entreated to Messes John Neave and Son, the contractors. The cost is estimated at £150,000, the time allowed for the completion of the work being two years and a half.

There were on Thursday 8 shafts at work, 4 others being in the course of sinking to the level of the sewer, which is from 40 to 50 feet deep. An important feature of the work is that the sewer is constructed in Portland cement concrete, consisting of ballast 5 parts, sand 1 part, and Portland cement 1, which is one third less cost than brickwork. Nine hundred feet of tunnelling is completed out of 28,100 feet. The length of the Cray Valley Branch Sewer is 34,736 and the total length of the Main Sewer is 58,528 feet. The sewer is egg-shaped, 6 feet by 4, and in one portion is a circular 6ft. sewer, and towards the outfall 5 feet 6. At the outfall the sewage can be discharged at all times. Five hundred men are employed on the work, which is progressing at the rate of 350 feet a week, the actual length under operation by the 12 shafts being 6500 feet.

The Board and visitors had a cold collation at the Black Horse, Sidcup, the gentlemen present being Col. Lennard, J.P., in the chair, R. B. Berens. Esq., J.P., Messrs Beggs, Couchman, and Janson, members of the West Kent Main Sewerage Board. The officers present were Sir Joseph Bazalgette, consulting engineer; Mr May, solicitor; Mr Mullen, clerk of the Board; and Mr Williams, C.E., resident engineer. The visitors present from Croydon Local Board of Health were Messrs Saunders, Coldwell, and Peerless; from Bromley Local Board, Dr Ilott; and the Beckenham Committee, Messrs Cobben, Carpmael, HolifieId, Lovelock and Molyor. Messrs Neave & Son and Mr Fry were also present.

Colonel Lennard said the scheme originated with the Public Health Act, which threw the work on the Bromley Board of Guardians. The Education Act had also been thrown on Boards of Guardians. The willing horse had too much thrown upon it, and sooner or later it would break down. The Bromley Board of Guardians did not wish to be accused of incapacity or idleness, and accepted the drainage work cheerfully. The Guardians had no means to recoup themselves unless the Bill became law, and a number of gentlemen agreed to a guarantee fund, to defray the costs in the event of the Bill not passing. These gentlemen commenced the work with a rope hanging about their necks, and trusted to those employed on the Bill to make their charges small in the event of non-success. They met with opposition at Bromley and Dartford; but it was withdrawn when it became evident that their interests were identical. They were willing that the Dartford, Bromley, and Croydon parishes should join in the scheme upon the same terms as themselves, the Board not wishing to make a profit out of them. Caution and care were necessary in the formation of the scheme, it being essential to avoid pettifogging on the one hand, and of frightening the ratepayers by going on too large a scale on the other hand. He believed the works were being carried on with the goodwill of all parties.

The works had begun at the outfall; but the roads being impassable, the Board proposed shortly to visit it by water, embarking at Erith.

Sir Jos. Bazalgette recommended parishes to combine for drainage purposes instead of going to work single-handed. They had a successful example that day of the result of combination.

The Metropolitan Main Sewage cost 4 millions, and was incapable of performing more work. It therefore became necessary to have a supplemental system. The West Kent scheme presented several novelties, such as aqueducts and a syphon. At the reservoir at Long Reach, the sewage would be filtered.

The health of Colonel Lennard was then proposed, after which the visitors proceeded to inspect the works. Amongst the geological curiosities there had been found 17 ft. strata of decomposed sea shells. and several members of the Board carried away some perfect specimens of oyster and other shells. The boring showed the strata to be what is known as the Woolwich and Reading beds. In one portion of the work, several of the visitors donned some rough clothing, and descended in a truck down a cutting 38 feet deep, where they walked along the sewer right and left. At the open cuttings they descended by a ladder, and walked about half a mile through the sewer, which was lighted up with candles. The visitors also inspected the manufacture of the concrete blocks, the washing of the ballast in the river Bourne, and other interesting points in connection with the works. In the evening some 50 or 60 of the workmen were regaled with a substantial supper.

Source: Bexley Heath and Bexley Observer – Saturday 23 June 1877 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

1877 : Proposed 100 acres of Mitcham Common for sewage

PROPOSED DRAINAGE OF MITCHAM, WALLINGTON, ETC.

Mr. Edridge said he wished make a remark respecting the Rural Sanitary Authority, although he did not wish to raise discussion. He was aware, that the members of the Authority bad recently experienced a great deal of trouble, still the subject involved in the question he was about to put was of such great importance to Croydon that he did not hesitate to put it. If the reply were in the affirmative he thought the fact was one which ought to come under the knowledge of the Board of Health, and they should take measures to further the interests of the district over which they had jurisdiction. He asked whether it was true that the Authority were in correspondence with the proper parties to whom it was necessary to apply in order to obtain a hundred acres of land at Mitcham Common for the purposes of sewage irrigation.

The Chairman said such thing had transpired, but there were 108 persons whose consent had to be asked before the Authority could obtain the land.

Mr. Randolph said it was true a resolution had been passed for the Authority to see on what terms they could purchase a hundred acres of Mitcham Common, but there were some difficulties in the way.

Mr. Edridge presumed that the Authority would not have taken such step except after a proper amount of consideration, and with the expectation that their action would lead to some result. He was therefore sure they would forgive him for having asked the question he had; and he thanked them for having given him the information he required.

Mr. Lindsey said the Authority had not given to the subject so much consideration it required ; but the thing had arisen because the Rural Board were driven up into a corner to find some mode of draining their district. It was therefore suggested at the last meeting that they might apply for a hundred acres of Mitcham Common. There had previously been some idea of making use of thirty acres of land, to carry out the intermittent filtration process; but it was thought it would not answer their purpose and expectations ; consequently they wanted to carry put the sewage irrigation system, and thought facilities for doing so would be gained if they could obtain a piece of land on Mitcham Common. It was true that they had applied, but they hardly expected to obtain the quantity of land they required, as it was necessary that the commoners must satisfied and agree before there could be any hope of obtaining the land.

Mr. Allen said the subject was one to be discussed by the Rural Sanitary Board, and not by the Board Guardians. Mr. Edridge, if he wished to speak upon the matter, ought to have come fully charged at the last meeting of the Authority; but, as the subject had been broached, he might well mention that Croydon applied for some land on the same common a few years ago, but the application was rejected. This was the only reason that could see for opposing the present application of the Rural Authority. But what could it matter to the people of Croydon, who had their parks and open spaces. The nuisance of 60,000 inhabitants was sent to Beddington, but instead being injurious to the health of the population, it was actually beneficial. He could not, therefore, understand why Mr. Edridge should come there to oppose the Authority. No doubt he came with the best intentions, but he had come at the wrong time. If he could wait till next week that would the proper time to bring the subject forward. Although there were 108 land owners to consult as to Mitcham Common, yet at present no benefit was derived from that land, but rather the reverse, as Gipsies caused a great nuisance there, and brought all sorts of diseases into the neighbourhood, at well a lot of donkeys and horses that ran all over the place. People like the Gipsies made extra work for the magistrates; yet when the Authority applied for a hundred acres of land for the drainage of the rural district they met with all sorts of obstacles from persons who ought to help instead of hindering them. There were 500 or 600 acres there suitable for irrigation, and of no use to the Inhabitants their present state. He therefore thought that Croydon ought not to offer opposition, although it might very well connect itself with Mr. Bazalgette’s scheme for taking sewage to the sea. Under all circumstances he thought it was most untimely to bring forward the subject, the Board of Guardians had nothing to do with it.

Mr, Edridge said his object was to ask question which interested Croydon generally, and to which he knew they would give him answer: but he should not have ventured to ask that question except a meeting of the Guardians, because, although had the honour of being an ex-officio member of the Board, was not member of the Rural Sanitary Authority, and was much obliged for the information that had been afforded. Mr. Allen said the Rural Sanitary Authority would glad to see Mr. Edridge at the right time if he had anything to say upon the matter referred to. This terminated the public business of the meeting.

Source: Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 17 February 1877 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

1877 Police Gathering

MITCHAM.

Police Gathering.

– On Friday the members of the police force stationed at Mitcham were, thanks to the energies of the Vicar and Mrs. Wilson, entertained at tea in the school room, Killick-lane. The policemen were accompanied by their wives and friends, and the gathering, which we understand is to be made an annual one, passed off to the satisfaction of all present.

The postmen, we are told, are to be similarly treated shortly.

Source: Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 10 February 1877
from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

1877 Distressing Case of Suicide

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 17 February 1877

The Distressing Case of Suicide.
—Press on our space prevented our giving in our last particulars of the melancholy suicide of Mr. Charles Alvericks Tradgell. We, therefore, now give a brief outline.

On Wednesday, the 7th inst., the wife of the unfortunate man heard the report of a pistol in the house, situate at Fair Green, Mitcham. She immediately gave alarm and man named Simpson and P.-c. Adams soon made their appearance, end discovered that the deceased had shot himself. A doctor was sent for but before he arrived life was extinct. It was found that the man had shot himself with a six barrelled revolver, the bullet entering brain through the ear.

From information given at the inquest held on Thursday last, at the Nag’s Head, it appears that the deceased had just returned from China, and unpleasant rumours with regard to family matters had since prayed an his mind, and that to such an extent that he committed the rash act we have mentioned.

A great deal of excitement has prevailed in Mitcham with regard to the affair, and manifestations have, we hear, been made against the wife of the deceased and another person. This was shown especially at the funeral, which took place Monday. A large crowd of persons followed the coffin to Mitcham Old Church, end assembled in the churchyard, the police not thinking it desirable that they should be allowed to enter the church in their excited state, as a disturbance might very probably have taken place. After the funeral was over the police were obliged to conduct the wife of deceased home, and then to watch the home, as many of the inhabitants had openly expressed their determination to duck her in the pond, and all kinds unpleasant rumours were circulated with regard to Mrs. Tradgell’s conduct.

1877 : The School Board Election

10th February 1877

The School Board Election.
Stormy Public Meeting.

– On Thursday a public meeting of the ratepayers of the parish, convened by Mr. T. Allen, was held Lower Mitcham schools. The room was filled in every part, and the proceedings were of the most uproarious character. It is simply impossible to give any adequate idea of the stormy nature of the meeting, but all that determined interruption, personal and insulting remarks, loud laughter, groaning, and shouting, could do towards making it a “good old” election meeting was persistently carried out.

The election is to take place on Thursday next, and there have been ten gentlemen nominated for the seven seats, viz., Messrs. Allen, Wade, Harwood, Wilson, Nobes, Coles, Hooper, Bridger, Legg, and Nicholls, Mr. Czarnikow being the only member of the present Board who declined to stand. About half-past eight Mr. Henry Wood was voted to the chair.

– The first candidate who addressed the meeting was Mr. Allen, who commenced by stating that he was a labouring man, and proceeded to object to a distinction being made between such men as himself and those described as “gentlemen” in the nomination papers. He entered into a tirade against the expenditure of the School Board, and stated his detestation of what he described as the “ iniquitous system” that was being carried out. He attacked the Board on many points as to harshness until one might have thought that the School Board for Mitcham was a veritable modern “ Court of Inquisition.” Mr. Allen also directed the flashes of his eloquence against the Act of Parliament itself.

– After a time Mr. Nobes rose and asked whether the speaker was right in going away from his subject as he had. This was the signal for uproar, roaring and shouting becoming the order, or rather the disorder, of the day. Ultimately, the chairman ruling that Mr. Allen was in order, certain of the meeting addressed themselves to Mr. Nobes and shouted “Turn him out.” Mr. Allen continued his speech and expressed his belief that nothing further should be imparted to the children than reading, writing, and arithmetic up to compound addition. The patience of the audience becoming somewhat exhausted, he was greeted with cries of “time,” when he coolly informed his hearers that he would only detain them “ten minutes longer.” The remainder of his observations were not listened to so attentively as the rest, various interruptions taking place. One individual especially devoted himself to personalites, amid cries of “order,” “turn him out,” &c. This gentleman having been silenced — for a time — the other end of the room was the scene of some disturbance, something having occurred to tickle the fancy of this part of the gathering. Upon Mr. Allen resuming his seat, he was greeted with cheers and demonstrations of an opposite nature.

– Mr. Wade followed, and rendered an account of his stewardship during the past three years. He said the Board had endeavoured to carry out the Act of Parliament with flrmness but gentleness. He touched upon the word “gentleman,” so complainingly alluded to by Mr. Allen, and advised the meeting to take no notice of the term. He explained the action of the School Management Committee, challenging anyone to say that they had treated persons coming before them with anything but courtesy. The individual previously referred to here caused some amusement by remarking that the Queen’s Speech ought to have been read. A gentleman in the audience appealed to the Chairman to silence this obnoxious person, whereupon the latter proceeded to the spot where the gentleman was seated, and, so it is said, requested him to fight. Of course the gentleman again appealed to the Chairman. A scene of confusion ensued, a number of the candidates and some of the audience remarking that if the Chairman could not keep order they would leave the meeting. The difficulty was in some degree surmounted by the disturber spoken being accommodated with a seat on the platform, where — for a time — he behaved himself much better. Mr. Wade, upon continuing, referred to the fallacy of the statement that the children were in danger of being over educated, and quoted figures in support of his remarks. Mr. Allen then rose and asked several questions amid some laughter and disturbance. and having obtained replies, went on to address the meeting again.

– Mr. John Harwood, the next candidate, waived his right to speak, and the Rev. D. F. Wilson next occupied the platform, and was received with cheers. He gave particulars as to the vast increase in the number of children receiving instruction during the last few years, and expressed bis helief that the work of the School Board had been a success. (Cheers, applause, and hisses.)

– Mr. Nobes, the next speaker, was received with cheers. He referred to the term ” gentleman ” harped on so much throughout the evening, and expressed his conviction that it was very ungentlemanly on the part of Mr. Allen to bring forward the subject so prominently as he had done. (Hear, hear.) With regard to the charge of harshness he would give £20 to any local charity if any ratepayer could say that he had used a harsh word to them in connection with the duties of the Board. (Mr. Allen – l did not mean you). As to the charge of extravagance, this was also unjust, as although the Board might have made some mistakes, they had never spent money carelessly. (Hear, hear.) He also announced that he had written to Mr. Blake to withdraw his name from the list of nominees. This statement was received with regret by the audience, and Mr. Allen expressed his conviction that Mr. Nobes was a gentleman, a voice from the audience confirming this statement in treble notes, amidst some laughter. Mr. Allen again attempted to speak, but the audience by this time not being in a temper to submit to any further infliction, met him with hisses and cries of “Chair,” ” We don’t want to hear you all night,” &c., until Mr. Allen, after remaining on his legs some time, was obliged to resume his seat, but eventually rose again and made other remarks.

– Mr. Coles, who was received with deafening cheers, commenced by making a further reference to the word “gentleman.” He also spoke of the necessity that had existed for the establishment of a School Board. He told the meeting he wanted to play a solo while on that platform, although he had noticed that while other speakers had been there, Mr. Allen had been indulging in a kind of double bass behind. (Laughter.) Proceeding humorously and effectively to combat some of the arguments of Mr. Allen, he alluded to circumstance to which the latter had referred, when he (the speaker) had told him he was showing his ignorance. In the course of his remarks he expressed his belief that Mr. Allen, on the occasion in question, was like a “maniac. ”

– Mr. Alien rose, and, in excited manner, demanded to know whether this was gentlemanly conduct, but Mr. Coles having apologised, rather spoiled his victory, by designating that gentleman as a “madman.” (Load laughter.) When the speaker concluded Mr. Allen rose once more, but was met with cries of “Question,” Sit down,” “Chair,” &c. Ultimately he sat down again, and Mr. Coles also resumed his seat amidst applause.

– Mr. J. P. Hooper also addressed the meeting, defending the action of the School Board. He did not think also that Mr. Allen could produce any proofs of extravagance.

– Mr. Allen once again assumed an upright position and asked a question, which was answered, and Mr. Hooper also explained at what standard children could be exempted from attendance at schools.

– Mr. Allen rose and yet again put further questions, and two or three times more endeavoured to address the meeting.

– Mr. J. Bridger was not able to be present.

– The Rev. F.S. Legg, in the course of his remarks, stated that he came forward as a candidate for the district of Singlegate. He referred to his practical experience of schools, expressing his sympathy with the children, parents, and teachers. He was listened to attentively and applauded.

– Mr. Nicholls shortly addressed the meeting, promising that if elected he would do his best for the ratepayers.

– Upon his resuming his seat, person in the room wished to ask question of Mr. Allan, and upon receiving permission, came forward and, with true sarcasm, enquired of that gentleman whether, if were elected, would work with the Board would have a Board of his own? (Loud laughter.) Shortly afterwards the meeting concluded, having lasted till close upon eleven.

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 10 February 1877 from the British Newspaper Archives (subscription required)

The Mitcham School Board Election. The polling took place Thursday. For some weeks past there has been a considerable amount excite ment prevalent the parish. The supporters of the various candidates have been animated in the discussion of their particular friends’ good qualities, and the advantages that were likely to accrue to the parish should they be elected. But very little ill-feeling, however, seems to have been engendered. Printer’€™s ink does not appear to have been very much used, the candidates’ addresses and one or two other manifestoes being the only outward and visible evidences the contest which was going on. The uproarious meeting of Thursday week certainly contributed in large degree to give the parishioners interest in the election, in fact the gathering has been one of the most lively subjects of conversation during the week. The shop windows of the town were the principal – almost the only – means of displaying the addresses of the various candidates, and it was a noticeable fact that in most places the utmost impartiality was observed, most of the shopkeepers exhibiting the addresses of all, without respect to party. On the day the election a stranger would not have been struck with any particular stir in the parish, in fact nothing but the aforesaid bills was observable to lead to the conclusion that so important an event as a School Board election was transpiring. The voting took place at three stations, situate at the Lower Mitcham Board Schools, the School Chapel, Upper green, and the Board schools, Merton-lane, and every arrangement was made the returning officer to ensure the proper carrying out of the privilege of voting. During the morning and afternoon the voters were comparatively few and far between, but in the evening, between the hours of six and eight, more animation was to be noticed, and close upon the hour for closing the poll there was some amount of rush.€ The utmost diversity of opinion existed with regard to the names of the three unfortunate candidates who would be at the bottom of the poll, and on enquiry of certain of the local celebrities different persons were mentioned as likely to be thus left out in the cold shade of defeat. One or two opinions, however, were generally prevalent. The Vicar was considered certain of election. Mr. Allen was confidently pointed to as being the candidate who would head the list, and Mr. Nobes was generally believed to be sure re-election. We heard it surmised that Messrs. Wade, Nichols, and Harwood would the defeated candidates, and others, again, would state their doubts as to the re-election of Mr. Hooper. The Singlegate people made considerable efforts secure the election the Rev. Mr. Legg and Mr. Nobes, calling upon the parishioners to give four votes to the former and three to the latter. The remaining candidates came in for their share public gossip. But few the gentlemen who had been nominated were noticed during the day, although most of them, should think, presented themselves at the polling books at different times to give their own votes. We heard of one the candidates, certainly the most energetic, riding about in a cart, from which at various spots delivered addressee to the electors, but this information cannot vouch for, although we think it a likely move on the part the individual referred to. The counting of the votes took place on Friday (yesterday), and the following were the numbers polled :-

Elected

Mr. Allen 1006
Mr. Legg 704
Mr. Wilson 589
Mr. Nobes 559
Mr. Nicholls 532
Mr. Wade 374
Mr. Hooper 362

Rejected

Mr. Coles 359
Mr. Harwood 213
Mr. Bridger 148

On looking at the above figures the first feature which particularly strikes one is fact that Mr. Allen has no less than 302 votes in excess of the gentleman whose name appears second. This result must be attributed to Mr. Allen’s personal popularity amongst a section of the parishioners, and perhaps in some degree to a feeling of dissatisfaction which exists amongst a portion the parish at the doings of the late Board, although it is—or ought to be well known that they are blamed for carrying out that which they could in no way avoid. The ratepayers, it would appear, expect great things of Mr. Allen. We earnestly hope they may not be disappointed.

Mr. Legg’s friends have certainly exerted themselves to place him in the position he occupies.

With regard to Mr. Wilson’s position other result was expected. Against this gentleman and Mr. Wade a dead set has been made by some of the inhabitants, and they were apparently censured for doing that which the very Act of Parliament lays down, and the entire Board has sanctioned. It is therefore matter for satisfaction that both gentlemen have been returned.

Mr. Nicholls we do not know, but apparently he is well known of the parishioners.

Mr. Hooper is the last elected candidate, and what is rather remarkable he has only received three votes above the next lowest, Mr. Coles, who with Mr. Harwood and Mr. Bridger are the rejected candidates.

By this election four members of the old Board will retain their seats, while new blood to the extent of three members will be imported. Two of the rejected candidates were members of the Board which has lately ceased to exist.

Source: Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 17 February 1877 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)