Tag Archives: 1929

Glendene, Love Lane

Possibly the earlier name for number 77 Love Lane CR4 3AW, in use before that road was renumbered.

In 1935 George Victor Dearn, of 77 Love Lane, registered the land that was to become Dearn Gardens. In 1929, planning application number 1515 was submitted by G.V. Dearn of “Glendene”, Love Lane, to build a WC and shed. The assumption then is that these two people are the same and that he didn’t move between 1929 and 1935.

Source: page 20, volume XV of Mitcham Urban District Council minutes, 1929-1930.

Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

1929 : Where to shop in Mitcham

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 4th January, 1929

advert in Mitcham News and Mercury from 1929

Where to Shop in Mitcham

USEFUL TELEPHONE NUMBERS
All Mitcham Exchange

FIRE BRIGADE : London-rd 0837
POLICE: “W” Division 0829
AMBULANCE: At Vestry Hall 0837
PUBLIC OFFICIALS:
Clerk to the Council 1543
Surveyor 1583
Public Health Officer 2907

BUILDERS MERCHANT –
J. C. SMITH Lower Green. Timber and building materials at lowest prices. ‘Phone: Mitcham 0823

PORK BUTCHER –
E. BIRCH and SONS. 274 London-road. Prime Southdown Mutton and Scotch Beef. Family orders a sepciality.

JEWELLER and Diamond Merchant.
J. B. ROMPEL London-road. Wedding rings sold by weight all shapes stocked or made up at short notice. the usual present with each wedding ring. Old gold and silver bought or taken in exchange. Dress and engagement rings of 18ct gold, platinum set with finest stones. Weekly payments taken.

STATIONERY & FANCY GOODS –
PERCY MAYHEW, 239 and 231 London-road, Mitcham. Large stock of Children’s Annuals and Reward Books. New Year Cards, Diaries, and Calendars. Splendid selection of Ladies’ Handbags, etc. Weekly payments taken. Mitcham 2478.

MEMORIALS –
A. J. STRINGER. Memorial Sculptor. 63 Church-road (opposite Mitcham Churchyard). Best work. Moderate price. ‘Phone: Mitcham 1532.

OPTICIAN –
J. B. ROMPEL. F.I.O. London-road. 40 years experience of sight testing and making of glasses of every description. Prescription work a speciality. All repairs quickly executed on the premises. Testing and advice on most up-to-date methods.

TAILOR –
H. LITTLECHILD. 276, London-road. High–class Tailor. Good quality, moderate prices. Trial order.

UNDERTAKER –
DONALD S. DREWETT, late John Chart. Upper Mitcham. Personal attention. ‘Phone: Mitcham 2905.

WATCHMAKER
J. B. ROMPEL London-road. 40 years experience. Repairs personally executed and guaranteed, completed and chronometer work a speciality. Watch glasses fitted while you wait. Fine selection gold and silver presentation watches; all leading lines of watches stocked.


Entries from the 1930 commercial directory

E. Birch & Sons, butchers, 36 & 38 Church rd. (T N 0817) & 274 London rd. T N 2454

Donald S. Drewett (nephew to the late J. R. Chart), undertaker, 45 Upper green east (Telephone, Mitcham 2905) & 118 London road

Horace Littlechild, tailor, 276 London Road

Percy Mayhew, confectioner. 231, & stationer. 239, London rd. T N 2478

John Baptiste Rompel, watch maker, 278 London Road.

John Smith, timber merchant, Lower Green West. T N 0823

A.J. Stringer junior (also Albert John Stringer, sexton, Mitcham parish church).

Plummer Lane

Road running north-westerly from Bond Road and Eveline Road.

Possibly built by H. Paulson in around 1926/7. A terrace of six houses on each side of the road, numbered odd on the west side, as 1 to 11 going north, and even on the east side 2 to 12. Royal Mail postcode lookup in 2017 shows 13 properties in CR4 3HR, with the addition of 2A.

1951 OS map

From the minutes of the Mitcham Urban District Council, Highways and Buildings Committee, on 7th November, 1929, page 469, the residents of Plummer Lane had written to the council asking for it to be renamed. The council said that:

the name was originally suggested to perpetuate the name of the Plummer family, who had left certain moneys for the benefit of the parish, which moneys are included in the sum administered by the Trustees of the Mitcham United Charities. … the residents were to be informed that the Committee saw no adequate reason for any change.

Thomas Plummer’s charity was created out of his will of 1641. Bread was to be handed out by the parish church, every Sunday, to the local poor. Source: Reports of the Commissioners Appointed in Pursuance of Acts of … concerning Charities and Education of The Poor, Volume 33.


News Articles

Dundee Evening Telegraph – Thursday 30 August 1928 (via the British Newspaper archive)

GIRL DRAGGED ALONG BY MOTOR CAR MUDGUARD.

As an ambulance was returning along London Road, Mitcham, with an accident case the driver, E. Hedger, heard a bump, and saw in his mirror a girl being carried along on the mudguard of a motor car that had just passed him. He stopped the ambulance, and picked up Hettie Sinclair, of Plummer Lane, Mitcham, who after stepping off a tramcar was caught by the motor car.

“It is my 14th birthday to-day,” she said as she was being taken to a doctor for treatment. She was taken home in the ambulance.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

1929 : Lonesome School teachers in car crash

MOTORING THRILL.

Mitcham Teachers in Fall Over Embankment.

Two young members of the teaching staff at Lonesome School, Mitcham, had an extraordinary adventure after leaving the school on Tuesday afternoon.

Shortly before five p.m. a Baby Austin saloon car in which they were riding crashed through the stout wooden fence on the eastern corner of the Bee Hive railway bridge and plunged down the very steep embankment on to the small plot of waste ground at the rear of the new houses in Spencer-road.

The car reached the bottom of the embankment, estimated to be seventeen feet in depth, right side up, fortunately.

The teachers were Miss Ivy Green, aged twenty-three, of 61, Elsted-street, Walworth, who was driving, and Miss Mary Runnacuss, aged twenty-one, of Defoe-road, Tooting. The car belonged to Miss Smythe, of 21, Tunney-road, East Dulwich, the well known and popular head mistress of Lonesome School, who was severely injured herself in a motor accident some time ago at Eastfields level crossing. She had lent her car to her two assistants for an hour while Miss Green was learning to drive. Miss Runnacuss was her instructress.
Neither of the girls was hurt in the least and scarcely suffered from shock. The only damage to the car was a smashed wind-screen.

Mr. George Mountain, of Smith’s Buildings, Commonside East, road foreman in the employ of the Urban Council, told the “Advertiser” that he saw the car crossing the bridge as a motor lorry was ascending from Grove-road. “The motorists,” he said, “evidently caught sight of the lorry as they turned into Grove-road, made a big swerve to avoid it and crashed through the fence doing so. If their car had struck the lamp-post inside the fence it must have turned turtle. I rushed to help the girls and thought they must certainly be seriously injured, but to my great astonishment both were calmly sitting in the car, and actually smiling! They displayed great nerve and coolness all through.”

Another witness said Miss Green remarked : ” I am glad the old ‘bus did not turn over at any rate.”

Half a dozen men, with Mr. Mountain, assisted the girls to get the car out of the “rough” into the narrow passage between the end house occupied-by Mr. and Mrs. Hayne, No. 1. Spencer-road, and the bottom of the embankment. The girls then drove it away. Miss Green gaily waving her hand to her helpers as she left!

A larger car could not have been got out of the well formed by the embankment and the houses, except with the aid of a crane.

Both teachers returned to duty at Lonesome School next morning, but the head mistress had to drive a motor cycle instead of her Austin seven.

Mitcham Advertiser, 17th October, 1929, page 6

1929 : Rock Terrace Character Dead

All Rock Terrace attended the funeral at Mitcham Cemetery on Tuesday afternoon of Mr Matthew Marney, aged sixty-three, a well-known Rock Terrace character.

There was a wonderful tribute of flowers. Mr Marney, like many of his relatives and friends at Mitcham and Tooting, was a flower hawker at one time.

There was a long procession of mourners who followed the remains from Queen’s Road and filled Parish Church. The Vicar of Mitcham conducted the service. The hearse was covered with wreaths and a coach carried the remainder.

Mitcham Advertiser, 4th April, 1929, page 1.

Ernest Charles Clay, Mitcham Borough Treasurer

5th December 1958. Clip from Merton Memories photo http://photoarchive.merton.gov.uk/collections/people/50478 (c) London Borough of Merton

5th December 1958. Clip from Merton Memories photo http://photoarchive.merton.gov.uk/collections/people/50478 (c) London Borough of Merton

Mitcham Borough Treasurer for twenty years, he died at his home in Sutton on Friday 31st January, 1964, aged 57. He had retired from the council in September 1963, and had been suffering from ill heath for a number of years. The funeral service was at Mitcham Parish Church on 5th February 1964 which was attended by the Mayor and Mayoress, Councillor and Mrs W.H. Sanderson; the Town Clerk, Mr R.H. White; and chief officers of Mitcham Council.

Mr Clay was one of the most prominent members in the community. Not only did he guide Mitcham Council on their methods of finance but also a large number of local organisations. He was a founder member of Mitcham Old People’s Housing Association; treasurer of the Old People’s Welfare Committee, the Citizens Advice Bureau, Mitcham Youth Committee and a founder member of the handicraft class for the disabled.

He was also a district head of the Forces Help Society and secretary of S.A.F.F.A. as well as being connected with many smaller organisations.

Mr Clay joined Mitcham Council in 1929 when it was an urban district. When Mitcham became a borough he was promoted to deputy borough treasurer and during the war he became the Borough Treasurer.

A keen photographer, he was to have been presented with the A.R.P.S. on Wednesday.

Mr Clay leaves a widow, son and daughter.

Source: Mitcham News & Mercury, 7th February, 1964, page 1.

In his will, he left his widow £5,516 which, when adjusted for inflation, is around £100,00 in 2017 values.

Ernest Charles CLAY of 86 Albion Road, Sutton, Surrey, died
31st January 1964.

Probate

London 18th March to Dorothy May Clay, widow. £5,516.

Source: Ancestry.com. England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966, 1973-1995.
Original data: Principal Probate Registry. Calendar of the Grants of Probate and Letters of Administration made in the Probate Registries of the High Court of Justice in England. London, England (c) Crown copyright.


Note about his forename: the newspaper article and Merton Memories photo refer to him as E.C. Clay. On Ancestry, a death index entry has an Ernest C. Clay, aged 57, first quarter of 1964, Surrey Mid Eastern (Vol 5G, page 294), which is assumed to be him. Also from Ancestry, the will for Ernest Charles Clay is a match on the date of death, residence in Sutton.