Tag Archives: Fair Green

Gaydons

Menswear shop, was at 11 Upper Green East, ‘facing the clock tower’ as stated in their ads

1972 ad

1972 ad

Text of ad:

GAYDONS
of
MITCHAM
(facing Fair Green Clock Tower)

for

MENSWEAR
YOUTHSWEAR
and NOW
BOYSWEAR

Telephone 648 2179

Also at:

130 Streatham Vale 764 2526
91 Streatham Hill 674 6479
3 Warwick Way, Victoria 834 4187

Ad from 1952:

1952 ad

1952 ad

Text of ad:

GAYDONS LTD.

MAN’S SHOPS

invite your inspection of their latest ranges

Sport Jackets = Smartly tailored in Single or Double Breasted styles.
Sports Trousers = Gaberdine or worsted in attractive new shades.
Suits = To suit all occasions. Expertly cut and tailored.
Raincoats = In cotton or wool Gaberdine.
Shirts & Ties = In modern and traditional styles.

For Men of Faultless Taste

Local Branch
11 UPPER GREEN – MITCHAM (Facing Clock Tower)

Also at
TOOTING
STREATHAM
VICTORIA
KINGSTON

McDonalds

First McDonalds restaurant opened in Mitcham in 1988 at 1 Majestic Way. It closed after 24 years on 8th September 2012. When questioned about the closure on their website, they replied:

Closing the Mitcham McDonald’s restaurant was not a decision we took lightly, but as we constantly review our estate, we decided not to renew it’s lease. There is another restaurant in Tooting which is only 1.7 miles away. With over 1,200 restaurants across the UK, it’s essential that we continue to have the right restaurants in the right places to ensure we stay relevant and convenient for our customers.

Clip from Merton Memories photo reference Mit_​5_​1-63 copyright London Borough of Merton

1973 Three publicans to be replaced by managers

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 18th May, 1973, page 1.

Storm brewing over pubs plan

Regulars at two Mitcham pubs are ready to put their backs to the bar and fight a bid by the brewers to evict their licensees.

At the Bucks Head in the Fair-green, Mrs Ivy Garner has been told to quit after 20 years.

At the Fountain in Western Road, Mr John Brown, whose family have run the pub for 42 years, has been told he must be out by September or sooner if possible.

The changes are part of a general trend towards managers. A spokesman for the brewers, Bass Charrington, said: “When we spend large sums of money on a pub it would put up the rent beyond the means of the average tenant and so we have to go in for managers.”

He added that a manager would be going into the Fountain, which was included in a council redevelopment plan and big changes will be made at the Bucks Head which could well mean a manager there as well.

Negotiating

A third tenant will also be moving. Charringtons say Mr Alf Pays of the Beehive in Commonside-east has asked to be released from his tenancy agreement but Mr Pays, who is 74, will neither admit or deny this. All he is prepared to say is that he is having negotiations with the brewers.

Signatures are being collected for three separate petitions and Fountain regular Mr Peter Wiseman warned that if the worst comes the worst he will park his mechanical shovel outside the door to stop John Brown being turned out.

He said John is the greatest publican in Mitcham. He’s lived in this pub all his life and he is getting a raw deal. I aim to top my petition with he names of all the landlords in Mitcham.

Mr Brown said he’s not moving until he has a new home. “I’m negotiating with the brewers for compensation but they haven’t offered me enough and at the same time I am looking for somewhere else to live but until both of these are settled I’m not budging and while I’m here it will be business as usual.”

Mrs Garmer thought it would be fairer if Bass Charrington adopted Courage Barclay’s policy. She said: “Courage are putting in managers as well but they wait until the tenants retires. I’m 59 so they wouldn’t have long to wait.”

One of the regulars who is signing the petition is Mr Charlie Harvey, manager of a nearby engineering equipment shop. “I know just what happens when a manager goes in because of my local in Richmond the tenant has just been made a manager and the place is not the same anymore. Once it used to be home, now it’s a business.”

If Alf Pays moves from the Beehive, Mitcham will not only lose its best known publican – he’s been there for 43 years and his father had the pub before him but it would also lose a charitable institution.

He helps to raise money for children, nurses and old folk.

Chairman of the Pollards Oak Fishing Club, who use the club room at the pub, Mr Bill Haynes, is organising the petition there. He said they can’t get rid of Alf, he’s part of the establishment.”

Barclays Bank, Fair Green

The Barclays Bank that opened at 6 Fair Green Parade was a sub-branch of the branch on the corner of 342 London Road and Lower Green West.

It possibly opened in 1958 as the telephone directory of that year lists the number as MITcham 7730. Fair Green Parade was built around 1953.

6 Fair Green Parade. Photo courtesy of Barclays Group Archives

6 Fair Green Parade. Photo courtesy of Barclays Group Archives

Interior of 6 Fair Green Parade. Courtesy of Barclays Group Archives.

Interior of 6 Fair Green Parade. Photo courtesy of Barclays Group Archives.

This branch moved in 1973 to a new building on the corner of Montrose Gardens, see newspaper article below.

29/31 Upper Green East. Photo courtesy of Barclays Group Archives

29/31 Upper Green East. Photo courtesy of Barclays Group Archives

39/41 Upper Green East. Photo courtesy of Barclays Group Archives

39/41 Upper Green East. Photo courtesy of Barclays Group Archives

BANK’S NEW OFFICES TO OPEN SOON

STAFF at Mitcham’s branch of Barclays Bank are soon to move into their new offices at Upper Green East.

And, promises manager Mr James Crocker, banking will be a lot pleasanter for both customers and staff than at the present cramped quarters in Fair Green-parade.

“We are hoping to move some time in mid-April and the new building on the other side of Fair Green will be much bigger, with six tills and a carpeted banking hall.” he said.

There will be an upstairs rest room and more toilet facilities for the staff.

The branch was a sub branch of the Barclays branch at Cricket Green when it opened several years ago.

“It was decided to make it a full branch as business has expanded a great deal in Mitcham,” said Mr Crocket. “Also we have to consider that a new supermarket is opening and probably more shops with the new central redevelopment.”

The staff of eleven at the present branch were working in very cramped conditions he added. “Now, with so much more room we will be having more staff.”

Source: Mitcham & Collier’s wood Gazette, 31st January 1973

York Place

Terrace of 7 shops, on the north side of the Fair Green, west of the London Road. It became part of St Marks Road, until demolished to make way for Majestic Way in the late 1980s.

york-place

early 1900s

1921

1921

1964

1964

From the Dentists Registry entries from 1879 to 1893, William James Jones was in practice as a dentist with the pharmacy at 1, York Place before 22nd July 1878.

From the 1891 street directory:

from High Street to Killick’s Lane

NORTH SIDE

1 W.J. Jones, chemist & stationer
2 Post Office
3 William Saynes, beer retailer
4 Joseph Shepherd, corn dealer
5 G.B. Bennett, tobacconist

7 William Shepherd, machine agent

In the 1915 street directory, these retain the numbers as above, but are part of St. Marks Road:

NORTH SIDE

1 John K. Harvey, chemist
2 Mrs L.C. Williams, dining rooms
3 George York, undertaker
4 H. Tedder, hair dresser
5 William Whittington, tobacconist
6 William Augustus Martin, butcher
7 S. & E. Rimmel, grocers

In the 1925 street directory, the shops have been renumbered odd:

1 John K. Harvey M.P.S., chemist
3 William Scratchley, dining rooms
5 George York, undertaker
7 H. Tedder, hair dresser
9 William Whittington, tobacconist
11 A. Bacon, hosier
13 S. & E. Rimmel, grocers

From the 1954 telephone directory:

1 J.K. Harvey, chemist & druggist, MIT 0892
3 Thorpes Radio, MIT 3964
5 George York, undertaker, MIT 2926
7
9
11
13

(Scratchley’s Dining Rooms is in the 1954 phone book at 310 High Street, Sutton VIG 4125)

The Parade

Parade of shops on east side of London Road, south of the Upper or Fair Green, consisting of 12 shops to Langdale Avenue, then a further 6 shops south of there. Historic England defines a ‘parade’ as

‘planned developments incorporating rows of shops (facing onto an outdoor space), with a strong degree of architectural uniformity…. (which) includes at least three shops’.

aerial view of The Parade

aerial view of The Parade

Built around 1905 according to Montague, in his Mitcham Histories : 12 Church Street and Whitford Lane, page 107.

Could the builder have been J. Harding? This planning application was approved at the same time as another for 12 houses in Langdale Avenue:
From the minutes of the Croydon Rural District Council
Volume IX 1903 – 1904
7th May 1903
page 72

No. 2505, Harding, J., 12 houses and shops, London Road, Mitcham

From a Tuck postcard dated 1950

From a Tuck postcard dated 1950

1913 map (1:2500 scale):

1913 OS Map courtesy of Merton Heritage Service

1913 OS Map courtesy of Merton Heritage Service.

This 1953 map shows it with the shops renumbered. (The map has been rotated.)


Occupants from Commercial Directories

1911

 

Number Occupier Trade
1 Milton IRELAND grocer
2 Wm. Geo. EVANS customs & excise officer
2 Mrs. Annie Brooking MARTIN ladies’ tailor
3 Mitcham Liberal Association
3 The World’s Stores Limited provision dealers
4 Alfred Thomas JENKINS confectioner
5 Leonard Thomas DAVEY auctioneer
6 B. H. CRAIG & Co photographers
6 Gordon WILLIAMS artificial teeth maker
7 National Telephone Co. Limited
7 James WHITE oil and color dealer
8 John DOOLEY stationer
9 Charles BREESE chemist
10 Jean Baptiste ROMPEL watch maker
11 Clement CARLTON greengrocer
11 Cyril MARRIOTT printer
12 Frederick George PEARCE baker
13 Wraight, Dumbriil & Co. Ltd dairymen
15 Jas. NELSON & Sons Ltd. butchers

The Parade – Brookman, baker, at number 12 on the corner, is listed in the 1915 directory, but not the 1911

No. 13 The Parade, occupied by Wraight Dumbrill Ltd. dairymen.

From the London Gazette : “Wraight & Dumbrill Ltd. was registered in 1899, changed name to Curtis Brothers & Dumbrill Ltd. in 1917, which went into voluntary liquidation in 1931.”

1915

Number Occupier Trade
1 Milton IRELAND grocer
2 George OAKES tailor
3 The Worlds Stores provision dealers
3 Mitcham Liberal Association political
5 Leonard Thomas DAVEY estate agent
6 Miss Ethel DIXON milliner
7 James WHITE oil & color dealer
9 Charles BREESE chemist
10 Gregory WILLIAM boot repairer
10 Harry HARDING builder
12 A.W. BROOKMAN & Co. bakers
13 Wraight Dumbrill & Co. Ltd. dairymen
14 Hawkins & Desmond laundry
14 Herbert SPENCER upholsterer
17 Cyril MARRIOTT printer

After renumbering
1 -> 225
2 -> 227
3 -> 229
4 -> 231
5 -> 233
6 -> 235
7 -> 237
8 -> 239
9 -> 241
10 -> 243/5
11 -> 247
12 -> 249

13 -> 251
14 -> 253
15 -> 255
16 -> 257
17 -> 259
18 -> 261
19 -> 263

From the 1930 commercial directory

Number Occupier Trade
225 James REYNOLDS grocer
227 George OAKES tailor
229 The Worlds Stores Ltd provision dealer
231 Percy MAYHEW confectioner
233 Pearks Dairies Ltd provision dealer
235 Walter HUNT greengrocer
237 James WHITE oil and colour dealer
239 Percy MAYHEW stationer
241 Edward WAVELL chemist
243 Harry HARDING builder
247 Russell and Son watch makers
249 Leonard T WELTEN confectioner
251 United Dairies dairy
253 Peckham Steam Laundry Ltd laundry
255 Stanley Philip BLOGG greengrocer
259 The Mitcham Printing Works printers engravers and account book makers
263 The Mitcham Garage motor engineers

Shops in 1989



Minutes of meetings held by the Croydon Rural District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

Durham House

Built c. 1722 and demolished 1971/2.

Eric Montague, in his book Mitcham Histories : 7 The Upper or Fair Green, Mitcham, chapter 7 says that the building was used by the Conservative Club from 1890 up to its demolition.

1970 Image courtesy of Collage – The London Picture Library - http://collage.cityoflondon.gov.uk

1970 Image courtesy of Collage – The London Picture Library – http://collage.cityoflondon.gov.uk

Two concrete block buildings were built on the site. Currently (2016) the Iceland supermarket occupies the site of the original Durham House next to Fair Green Court, and a second concrete block, next to Raleigh Gardens, is occupied by the Mitcham Conservative Club. In 2018, the bar and function room were refurbished as the General Giles Social Club.

2009 photo.

2009 photo.

undated photo of the Fair Green shows Durham House on the left

undated photo of the Fair Green shows Durham House on the left

1921 aerial photo shows Durham House bottom left

1921 aerial photo shows Durham House bottom left

An advertisement to let of 1872 describes the house as a:

capital FAMILY RESIDENCE, in substantial and good decorative repair … containing six bed-rooms, two dressing-rooms, dining and drawing rooms ; water and gas laid on; large garden, walled in, perfectly private

News Articles

1891 funeral of William Garraway tells of when his father bought Durham House.

MITCHAM.

Funeral of Mr. William Garraway.

— On Monday last the funeral of Mr. William Garraway, of Kennington, Surrey, who died, as announced in our obituary column of last week, on the 11th inst. from bronchitis, in his 80th year, took place at Mitcham. The deceased gentleman was interred in the old part of the churchyard between the grave of his brother, Mr. George Garraway, and that of his father and mother. The coffin was of polished oak with brass furniture, and the plate bore the following inscription in capitals : William Garraway, second son of Abel and Amelia Garraway, of Mitcham, Surrey, and grandson of Daniel and Elizabeth Garraway, of Croydon, Surrey. Born Reigate, August 6th, 1811 ; died at Kennington, March 11th, 1891.”

The burial service was read by the Vicar (the Rev. D. F. Wilson), and a muffled peal was rung both before and after the service. The mourners were Mr. R. Garraway Rice, F.B.A, barrister-at-law, Mr. John Forsey, Mr. John Rogers, end Mr. J. D. Bartlett. Mr. William Garraway in early life studied for the medical profession at St. Thomas’s Hospital, but relinquished it without qualifying.

His father, Mr. Abel Garraway, who was for many years resident owner of Durham-house, Upper Mitcham, now the Conservative Club House (which his father, Mr. Daniel Garraway, had purchased of Lieut.-General Giles Hibbert about the year 1808), will be well remembered by the older inhabitants as a gentleman of literary tastes, who took considerable interest in parochial matters. Mr. Abel Garraway was quite one of the old school, always wearing a frilled shirt front and dress coat, and he usually carried silver knobbed cane. He left Hackney to reside at Durham-house, Mitcham, in the year 1841, but died at Glebe Lands in the latter parish in his 79th year on the 11th of January, 1860, having removed there some few years previously.

Source: Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 21 March 1891 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

Note that Montague says the surname was Stibbart, not Hibbart.

Harriet Slater worked as a servant to Abel Garraway when he lived at Glebelands House.


Merton Memories
c. 1850 engraving
undated drawing

clip from Merton Memories photo 30928

clip from Merton Memories photo 30928 copyright London Borough of Merton

A stone with the inscription A.G. 1809 is now on display behind the bar at the General Giles Club. It had been in the Conservative Club office.

photo taken 8th October 2018

The initials are likely to be Abel Garraway, whose father Daniel bought the house from General Giles Hibbert in 1808, as referred to above in the news item on the 1891 funeral of Abel’s son William.