Tag Archives: Gorringe Park

Christ Church, Colliers Wood

sketch of the church from the May 1926 issue of their magazine

Church, on Christchurch Road, which was built in 1874.

Its address is 58 Christchurch Rd, Colliers Wood, London SW19 2NY

It was originally in the Mitcham parish and was built to cater for the increasing population in north Mitcham. The area covered by the church was described in the London Gazette, see District Chapelry of Christ Church.

From The Builder magazine, 4th July 1874:

Church-Building News
Mitcham.

The new church at Singleton has been consecrated by the Bishop of Winchester. The edifice, which containes 550 sittings, has been built from designs by Messrs. Francis, of London, the total cost being £4,283. The chief part of this sum has been the joint contribution of Mr and Mrs Harris, of Gorringe Park, Mitcham, who have also erected, at their sole cost, a parsonage and mission-room, on the adjoining ground. The amount of their gift is between £6,000 and £7,000. The site has been in part the gift of Emanuel College.

Note the spelling Singleton should have been Singlegate.

Eric Montague said, in his book Mitcham Histories 2 : North Mitcham, page 93, that in 1968, on his suggestion, the chapelry boundary stone that was in Streatham Road, opposite the east lodge of Gorringe Park House, be moved to the church for safe keeping.

In this OS map of 1895, the church was surrounded by fields, with watercress beds opposite.

1895 OS map

See also the history of Christ Church on the church’s website.


Photos taken 15th April, 2019


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Tyrell’s Poultry Farm

A poultry farm that was in Gorringe Park up to around 1913, when the St Barnabas church was built.

According to Eric Montague, writing about St Barnabas church in his Mitcham Histories : 2 North Mitcham, page, 109:

During preparation of the site for the new church what remained of Gorringe Park stables, then known as Tyrell’s Farm, was demolished.

He also said that a clock, removed from one of the old farm buildings, was installed in the church tower through the generosity of Joseph Wilson and his wife, who were living at Gorringe Park House at the same time as the church was built.

The 1904 street directory describes Gorringe Park Avenue as walked from the London Road:

…. here is Bruce Road
Charles FROST (Gorringe Park Lodge)

Christ Church Church Room

Christleib T. LIPSHYTZ (Gorringe Park House)

The Surrey & Sussex Poultry Farm Limited

Arnold & Arnold, veterinary surgeons (Gorringe Park)

The spelling of the surname differs in the 1910 electoral register, which shows William TYRRELL at Poultry farm, Gorringe park. Henry TYRELL is shown at 5 Thirsk Road.

The 1911 street directory, also described from west to east, now shows William Tyrell poultry farm:

…. here is Bruce Road
St Barnabas District Mission Church

St Barnabas’ Men’s Club (W.G. WOODWARD, hon. sec.)

Reverend Christleib T. LIPSHYTZ (Gorringe Park House)

William TYRELL poultry farm

Arnald & Arnald, veterinary surgeons (Gorringe Park)

This can be compared to the 1911 OS map:

1911 OS map

The assumption then is that field numbers 574 and/or 575 were the locations of the poultry farm, with 571 being the vets.

The path that is shown between Gorringe Park House and the poultry farm is followed today by the course of Edenvale Road, as shown on the georeferenced OS map on the NLS website:


During World War 1, three members of the Tyrell family were called up and went to the Military Service Tribunal to ask for exemption. Reports of the tribunals in local newspapers have been summarised by the Merton Historical Society

3rd March 1916

“My business, run under agreement, cannot be run without my supervision,” wrote Mr. Albert Tyrell, aged 31 years, keeping a poultry farm at Mitcham, and who is a pig breeder and butcher at Streatham.
Claim for exemption was disallowed.

Leonard Tyrell, 28, a poultry farm keeper and pig breeder, whose mother is dependent on him, claimed total exemption but was only given a month.

8th September 1916

John William Tyrell, 23, a pig and poultry dealer, was quite unable to get anyone to carry on his business if he went. This was his fourth Tribunal appearance. His father, aged 58, suffered from a strained heart, and had been medically certified as unfit for heavy manual labour. The Chairman thought there was no reason why he should not turn to and do what he could; we were all now doing things that once we had given up doing. One more month, to be final.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Gorringe Park House

Clip from Merton Memories photo, reference Mit_​Churches_​3-1, copyright London Borough of Merton

This photo shows the conservatory to the left, and the part of the curved drive leading to the entrance. Both of these features can be seen on this 1911 OS map:

1911 OS map

According to Eric Montague in his Mitcham Histories : 2 North Mitcham, page 91:

Built on the site of Biggin Farm, Gorringe Park House, was a substantial three-storied three-bay brick and slate roofed mansion in the modified version of the Italianate style which had become popular in the 1850s. The farmyard, complete with its piggeries, rickyard and barns, was retained, but the meadows and orchards in the immediate vicinity of the house were transformed to form gardens and parkland.

William John Harris, for whom the new house seems to have been built … in the 1871 census his occupation was listed as ‘Landed Proprietor’ and in the 1881 census stated his ‘Income From Land House Property’ … was related to the Moore family.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Mitcham Argyle Football Club

From a postcard dated 1907

News Articles

MITCHAM ARGYLE v. CLAPHAM R.

The Mitcham Argyle club opened their Balham and District League programme on Saturday, with a match against the Clapham United at Gorringe Park, and after a a very exciting time, the game ended in a draw of 5-5.

The Argyle, who were again. unfortunately, unable to have the services of their goalkeeper, won the toss, and play kicked off for the Rovers at 3.30, who immediately made tracks for goal, but were sent back by Prentice. Clapham kept up a persistent attack, and it was not very long before their efforts were rewarded by a mistake by the Argyles’ left back letting in Clay, who with a clear goal made no mistake with his shot. Shortly after the same player nearly added another goal with a fast shot at short range. which Mullins, who was playing goal in place of Hillier. just managed to put over the bar. After this the Argyle had a turn, and the United’s goal had some very narrow escapes, but eventually Ayling managed to obtain near goal and made the score even with a nice shot. From the kickoff the ball was sent well up towards the Argyles’ goal, and a race for the hall between Mullins and Clay ended in the latter securing and scoring in easy fashion. The Argyle were not long in drawing level, a line pass by Carey being neatly converted by Craib, and almost immediately after the whistle went for halftime.

On resuming the United attacked strongly and scored twice, both goals being by Waddam, the first was a good effort, but the second was an absolute present. Mullins letting the ball through his hands in a most unaccountable manner. Clapham’s large lead seemed to increase the efforts of the Argyle players. A nice run by Carey was finished with a lovely shot, which had the goalkeeper beaten all the way. Following this Ayling got clear away and sent to Craib who slammed the ball into the net and made the score level again. The game was now getting somewhat exciting, and the referee had to caution Clay, the United’s centre for ward for unfair tactics. The next goal fell to the Argyle, and was the best effort of the match. Craib obtained from the kickoff and travelled right through the United’s defence and ended with a shot which gave the goalkeeper no earthly chance. The Argyle made great efforts to keep their lead, but towards the end Noble obtained and shot from 20 yards and beat Mullins, who was handicapped by the centre-half getting in his line of sight. The score was again level, and both teams made determined efforts to obtain the lead, but nothing further was scored, and the game ended as above.

The Argyle showed improved form, and on Saturday, when they play their first home match on Figgs marsh, hope to have their best side out, and register their first win of this season.

Source: Croydon Guardian and Surrey County Gazette – Saturday 09 October 1909 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

MITCHAM ARGYLE v. WATERFALL

The Mitcham Argyle Football Club opened their fifth season on Saturday last, with a match against the Waterfall F.C. on the latter’s ground, and after a very good and even game, the Argyle were beaten by one goal to nil. This result can be reckoned satisfactory by the supporters of the Argyle, considering that several new men were included in the team, which naturally did not allow of smooth working and complete understanding at the first time of asking, but on the whole, the form displayed was distinctly encouraging. and after a week or two the Mitcham Argyle F.C. should develop into a very decent combination.

The match on Saturday was fought out in a very friendly spirit and the first half should have seen the Waterfall leading, several good attempts by their inside forward, being cleverly frustrated by the Argyle goalie, W. Hillier, and towards the finish of the first half, J. Relf, the Argyle capt., in attempting to clear from the Waterfall centre, headed through his own goal, but the referee’s whistle had just previously gone owing to an injury to Hillier. Half time arrived with neither side claiming any advantage.

The second half was fairly even, although both sides missed easy chances, and twenty minutes from the finish a penalty was given against the Argyle for an obviously unintentional infringement by the right back. The penalty was taken by the Waterfall centre, who shot hard and true, but Hillier was there and cleared well. Two minutes from the time the Argyle was subjected to a strong attack, and after a scrimmage in front of goal, Roots obtained and sent in a fine shot which cannoned off the goal post into the net. One minute later the final whistle went, and the Argyle retired beaten by a goal to nil, after a very fine game.

For the losers, Hillier gave a display in goal, and Prentice at left back was great. Relf also played well, and the same must be said of Kemp and Roots for the winners. On Saturday next the Argyle will be entertained by the Caithness Rangers.

Source: Croydon Guardian and Surrey County Gazette – Saturday 25 September 1909 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

St Barnabas church

Church between Gorringe Park Avenue and St Barnabas Road, built in 1913/4. Designed by Henry Philip Burke Downing (1865 – 1947).

Foundation stone was laid on Saturday, 17th May, 1913, according to article in the Church Times, 23rd May, 1913, page 23 :

City of London School Mission.

On Saturday last the Lord Mayor, accompanied by the Sheriffs, drove down in state to Mitcham in order to lay the foundation-stone of the new Church of St Barnabas, which will be used in connexion with the City of London; School Mission. The service was conducted by the Bishop of Southwark, the Rev. E. J. Baker, the Mission priest, reading the Lesson. The Mission, which is conducted largely by the old boys of the City of London School, has been in existence for six years, and has done excellent work in this rapidly growing artisan area.

The new church, which will occupy a site in Gorringe Park, will have seating accommodation for 830 persons. The cost will be about £10,000, and £3,000 are still wanted, towards which £7,000 have already been contributed by public grants, funds raised by the School Mission Committee, and by the South London Church Fund. The raising of the remaining £3,000 is a matter of some concern to the Building Committee, The Bishop of Southwark expressed thanks for the generous sympathy, encouragement, and support of all connected with the City of London School. The Lord Mayor said that when the school decided to have a mission of its own it chose Mitcham, recognising that so many of the workers in the City resided there. Dr. Chilton, head master of the school, expressed thanks to the Lord Mayor, who has consented to receive at the Mansion House further contributions to the fund. The school Cadet Corps formed a guard of honour during the proceedings.

1934 OS map

For more, see the church’s website.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Harry Frederick Winbow

Mr Harry Frederick Winbow, who knew Mitcham Common when cows grazed on it, died last week the age of 89.

Mr Winbow, Commonide East, Mitcham, is the father of Mr Henry Winbow, chairman of Mitcham Common Preservation Society.

He came to Mitcham in 1900 and bought a house in the Gorringe Park estate , then being developed. In those days the house was surrounded by corn fields

Most of his life he was a maintenance engineer at the Bachelors’ Club in the West End.

Before he retired at the age of 70, he ran the Dorset Inn at Withyham, Sussex, for five years. During the First World War he served in the Royal Flying Corps.

Mr Henry Winbow said this week: “Many people knew him in Mitcham, especially the traders at Fair Green. He used to do the shopping for us.”

He leaves a widow, Agnes Louise (aged 92), two sons, Henry and Arthur, and a daughter, Maud.

Source: Mitcham News and Mercury, 13th January, 1961.


Harry Frederick Winbow in the 1911 England Census
Name: Harry Frederick Winbow
Age in 1911: 39
Estimated birth year: abt 1872
Relation to Head: Head
Gender: Male
Birth Place: Westminster, London, England
Civil Parish: Mitcham
County/Island: Surrey
Country: England
Street address: Kendrick, Commonside East, Mitcham, Surrey
Marital Status: Married
Occupation: Electrical Engineer In Club
Registration district: Croydon
Registration District Number: 39
Sub-registration district: Mitcham
ED, institution, or vessel: 14
Household schedule number: 33
Piece: 3434

Household Members:
Name Age
Harry Frederick Winbow 39
Agnes Louise Winbow 41
Henry Francis George Winbow 16
Constance Elizabeth Winbow 15
Maud Mary Louise Winbow 13
Arthur Stanley Buckler Winbow 3
William Holmes 84
Dorothy Beatrice Holmes 19

Source Citation
Class: RG14; Piece: 3434; Schedule Number: 33
Source Information
Ancestry.com. 1911 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.
Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1911. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA), 1911.

Ascot Road

Road built on a former golf course, hence the name the Links Estate, in around 1907. Between Seely Road and Links Road.

1913 OS map

1913 OS map

From the minutes of the Croydon Rural District council
Volume XII 1906 to 1907
Highways and New Streets and Buildings
10th January 1907

Application number 4129 from Mac Callum Bros. to build 50 houses in Ascot Road.


Occupants rom the 1915 street directory

from Links Road:
WEST SIDE

1, Alfred John SEWELL
3, Charles Robert STEGGALL
7, John BACON
9, Henry ROCHE
11, Amos JEFF
13, William J White
15, Ernest CROOK
17, James Cameron PARHAM
19, William JOHNS
21, Bertie John SAUNDERS
23, Mrs M.A. WHITE
25, Joseph OLSTEAD
27, William BUNDOCK
29, Edward WALTERS
31, Miss DELPLANQUE
33, Charles Henry GODWIN
35, Augustus WRIGHT
37, George PARTRIDGE
39, George Campbell GRACE
Ascot Villa, William BALDRY

EAST SIDE

2, William COOK
4, Ercole RAFFONI
6, Henry John TESTER
8, Francis BLACKWELL
10, Edmund George NEALE
12, Lascoff HUMPHREYS
14, Edward James FERGUSON
16, Charles Frederick Durrie MULFORD
18, Mrs MANDER, nurse
20, Walter John ELLIS
22, Daniel Chant WILLIS
24, William John COX
26, Lewis ESCOTT
28, John SANTRY
30, William Joseph McCARTNEY
32, Walter Henry JORDAN
34, Thomas WEATHERSTON
36, James Arthur TILLOTT
38, Chalres James SCREECH
40, Mrs CLARK
42, Frederick Robert GREEN
44, Henry SPOONER
46, Arthur James REEVE
48, Herbert CROSSLAND
50, Mrs TAYLOR
52, Charles MORITZ
58, William WEXHAM
60, William Henry JULIAN

From a 1939 auction:

SALE TUESDAY EVENING NEXT.

LEONARD DAVEY & HART Have been instructed to offer by Auction, at the Greyhound Hotel. Croydon, on TUESDAY. 28th MARCH, at 6.30 p.m. The following properties:-

9, ASCOT ROAD, TOOTING JUNCTION.

— Attractive centrally situated Villa, producing £65 gross. Lease 67 years at £5.


Minutes of meetings held by the Croydon Rural District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.