Tag Archives: Preshaw Crescent

Bombardier Ivor Collin Victor Hawkins

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 1st September 1944, page 1.

BOMBARDIER HAWKINS WON’T CARE IF IT RAINS

News comes this week of Bombardier I.C.V. Hawkins, son of Mr and Mrs Hawkins, Preshaw-crescent, Lower Green West Mitcham, who for four years has been serving with the RA in the Middle East.

Bdr. Hawkins joined the Territorials in 1936, and was mobilized the day war broke out. Since then he has seen many new parts of the world, has fought in the Eritrean campaign, then in the Western Desert, and was in the Siege of Tobruk.

Later he was in Iraq, Persia, the Lebanon, Syria, Palestine, and Egypt. Bdr. Hawkins thinks he has seen quite enough of the world.

His one ambition is to get home. ”Four years overseas in the Army is four years too much,” he remarked to a Military Observer, ”particularly in an area like the Middle East. I should be glad to get home and stay home – even if it does rain all summer.”

From the Royal Artillery Attestations 1883-1942

Ivor Collin Victor HAWKINS
Service Number : 862125
Attestation year : 1936

From the British Army Casualty Lists 1939-1945

Gunner I C V Hawkins
144 Fd.Regt.
Wounded Eritrea 3rd February 1941

Percy Mayhew

Confectioners, newsagents and stationers, from early 20th century to possibly the late 1960s.

A number of postcards of scenes in Mitcham have his name on them, such as this undated one of London Road.

‘Mayhew’ in bottom left hand corner.

This photo of Preshaw Crescent has ‘Mayhew Mitcham’ on the left and ‘2721 Johns’ on the right, who might have been the photographer.

Preshaw Crescent

This photo of the Blue Houses has ‘Percy Mayhew’ on the left.

Ravensbury Arms and the Blue Houses

There is a collection on Merton Memories.


In the 1919 electoral register, Daisy Maud and Percy Mayhew are listed at number 8, The Parade. In the 1925 street directory, listed as a confectioner at number 4 The Parade, which was renumbered as 231.

Listed in the 1929 Where to shop in Mitcham advert as at 239 and 231 London Road.

This ad, possibly from 1935, shows 237 – 239 London Road:

This ad from 1947 has the Monarch Parade address and refers to the previous address of 237 – 239 London Road.

1947 ad

In the programme for the 1952 Sports and Shopping Week his shop is listed as having contributed a pen and pencil set, worth 13s. 11d., as a prize in the lucky programme number competition. The address of the shop then was 72 Monarch Parade. The shop can just be seen on the right of Davant Ltd (the furniture shop at number 73), in this 1950 Tuck postcard:

1950 Tuck postcard

Listed in the 1954 telephone directory as newsagent, tobacconist, 72 Monarch Parade, London Road, MIT 2478.

Listed in the 1967 edition of the Mitcham Chamber of Commerce Yearbook, but not in the 1969 edition.

Leonard Davey and Hart

Estate agents that were at 17/19 Upper Green East from around 1938 to 1990s?
The firm was listed in the 1971 telephone directory as 01-648 6101.

A planning application from 2001, number 01/2690, submitted by Ladbrokes Ltd show it had become a betting shop:

erection of ground floor rear extension, new shop front, disabled access, 2 air conditioning units, satellite dish and railings at rear of building.

In 1984, estate agency Dixon Hind & Company submitted a planning application, number MER1149/84, for an illuminated sign at 19 Upper Green East. On Merton Memories there is a photo dated c.1987 which shows that estate agent Dixon Hind was the occupant, whose sign said ‘in association with Leonard Davey & Hart’.

Clip from Merton Memories photo reference Mit_​11_​1-50, copyright London Borough of Merton.

ad from 1938

Text of ad:

Mitcham and District

Leonard
Davey & Hart

Herbert E. Hart, P.A.S.I
Leslie O. Hart, B.Sc., P.A.S.I, A.A.I.

Chartered Surveyors, Auctioneers
House, Land and Estate Agents

Rents collected. Mortgagaes
arranged.
Valuations for all purposes.

UPPER GREEN, MITCHAM
And at 781 London Rd., Thornton Heath
telephone : MITcham 0808 THOrnton Heath 1361

According to the 1938 Official Guide to Mitcham, the firms was established around 1903:

Messrs. Leonard Davey & Hart, Chartered Surveyors, Auctioneers, Estate Agents, of Upper Green, Mitcham, have been established for about thirty-five years. The firm was founded by Mr Leonard T. Davey and originally had its offices in the Parade, London Road, moving to its present address nearly twenty years ago.

During the years immediately following the war, when there was much building development in the district, Messrs Leonard Davey & Hart were appointed agents for several of the new estates then laid out. It is perhaps a matter of interest that they acted on behalf of the owners from whom the London County Council purchased the first section of land to the south of Mitcham, since developed as the St Helier Estate.

The business to-day is conducted by Mr H.E. Hart, P.A.S.I., and his son, Mr L.O. Hart, B.Sc., P.A.S.I, A.A.I., who joined him shortly after the retirement of Mr Davey in 1928. The firm’s premises at Upper Green, Mitcham, have recently been rebuilt at considerable expense, and form one of the most modern and well-equipped offices in the district.

Many Mitcham properties including the well-known Ravensbury Manor House, have passed through the hands of this firm and it is not surprising that they, as the oldest firm of Auctioneers in the district, should have an extensive register of properties for sale and to be let.

Apart from this, they have an increasing business in rent collection and Estate management, the properties under their control being situated not only throughout the Borough, but in many surrounding districts. Among those for whom they conduct surveys and valuations are certain Banks and Building Societies, besides private Clients; but the principals seek to give the same personal attention to all who consult them on the varied matters which come within their professional expertise.


News Articles

A COSY COTTAGE CLAIM.

James Henry Scurr, an ironmonger, of 170, Lambeth-walk, London, brought a claim against George Samuel McDo??ugh, of 17, Langdale-avenue, Mitcham, for £13 rent.

There was a counterclaim for £10 10s. for damages due to trespass.

Mr. W. Hood appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr. C .E. Graveley for defendant.

Plaintiff said that defendant was the tenant of Cosy Cottage, Whitford-gardens, Mitcham. He had it on a three years lease. Early this year the defendant said that he wished to be relieved of the tenancy. Witness did not object to this providing that defendant found a suitable tenant. He had never found a tenant, and still had the key. He borrowed the key and inspected the premises, after which he had the door varnished and a plate. “Cosy Cottage,” put on the house, in order to facilitate the letting.

Cross-examined defendant objected to the house being changed to “Cosy Cottage.” He preferred – Cosy Lodge. Witness got the key on May 28th. Mr. Davey did not point out to witness that he was not entitled to the premises. He did not know who removed the announcement pointing out that defendant had moved. Witness thought that he had a right to enter, as there was a clause in the agreement to that effect. Defendant had never had a copy of the tenancy agreement. By Mr. Hood—Mr. Davey was never witness’s agent. Witness bought the property when defendant was the existing tenant. He never touched any rubbish on the premises. Defendant said that he took the house in June, 1906, when it was quite new. He removed to Langdale-avenue in March, and when plaintiff suggested the change witness objected, and also sent a letter to that effect. Witness put up a notice that he was moving, as he had a lot of people calling on him. When he moved he gave the key to Mr. Davey, and asked bum to find a tenant. Later witness found that the notice was gone, and that the door had been varnished. He left some frames, vases, tools, and other articles in the house, and he found they were gone. Plaintiff said that he saw defendant about the door, and plaintiff said that he would release defendant of the un-expired time if he informed Mr. Davey to give up the key. Witness asked him to write him to this effect, but plaintiff did not do so.

Cross-examined he did not think he should pay the July quarter, as plaintiff had practically taken possession. He could have let the house.

Leonard Thomas Davey, an estate agent, said that plaintiff’s daughter called for the key on May 27th. No reason was given why the key was wanted. He had numerous enquiries respecting the house until defendant said that he was not responsible for the rent.

Harry Frank Joynes, who had done jobbing work for the plaintiff, deposed to varnishing the door for the plaintiff. He saw the notice in the window to the effect that defendant had moved.

Mr. Graveley submitted that damage had been done by the premises being thrown open, and the articles were thus lust, and the notice removed. His Honor gave judgment for plaintiff on the claim and counterclaim.

Source: Croydon Guardian and Surrey County Gazette – Saturday 15 August 1908 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

1926 auction of Mrs Lipshytz property at Mitcham Park.


A member of the Facebook Mitcham History Group remembers Mrs & Mrs Hart when he was a child in the 1960s. They lived next door, in Preshaw Crescent, and was also their landlord. He said:

They were a lovely couple of real gentlefolk of the old school. She was one of the Sunday School teachers in the parish rooms, across the green, and he owned and ran Hart’s estate agency, with the office at the Fair Green (next door to the Nat West Bank, or thereabouts). He always wore a trilby hat, and would doff it whenever he passed a lady.


ad from 1925

Glebe Path

Road that runs northwards off of the north side of Lower Green West.

The houses were probably built in 1929 or later by Isaac Wilson. The title deeds for one of the houses up for auction in February 2017 show that he bought the land on 10th November, 1928.

A Conveyance of the land in this title and other land dated 10 November 1928 made between (1) The Revd. Charles Aubrey Finch (the Incumbent) (2) The Governors of the Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of the Maintenance of the Poor Clergy (3) Cyril Forster Bishop of Southwark (4) The Revd. Alard Charles De Bourvel (5) Randall Thomas Archbishop of Canterbury and (6) Isaac Henry Wilson (Purchaser)

On this 1867 OS map a path is shown across ‘glebe’ fields to the Glebelands house. These fields had been bought in the 18th century using the Queen Anne’s Bounty, which was a scheme for providing an income to the local clergy.

1867 OS map

1867 OS map

This 1910 OS map shows a road called Glebe Path, the row of houses on the left in Lower Green West is Preshaw Crescent, and the separate houses on the right were called Glebe Villas.

1910 OS map

1910 OS map

The OS map for 1953 shows the houses in this road. On the western, left hand side, going north, is a detached house, then a pair of houses before the junction with Russell Road which runs westward. North of Russell Road is a terrace of eight houses. On the eastern, or right hand side, the map shows a terrace of seven houses north of the junction with Russell Road opposite. At the north end of Glebe Path, the road turns right into Queen Annes Gardens.

1953 OS Map

1953 OS Map

Aerial photos

west side

west side

west side after Russell Road

west side after Russell Road

east side

east side

After the old people’s housing of Glebe Square had been built, an attempt in 1960 to renumber all the properties in Glebe Path was made by Mitcham Council, but the homeowners in the road protested. See Seven Defy The Council.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Queen Anne’s Bounty

To help with the income of poor clergy, the Queen Anne’s Bounty was a sum of money used to buy land. This land was then rented out and this rental income was used to support the clergy.

In 1734, £200 of this Royal Bounty was used to buy an area of land from Charles Dubois in Mitcham, to support the vicar at the parish church.

Source: An Account of the Augmentation of Small Livings by “The Governors of the Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of the Maintenance of the poor Clergy” published in 1856, by Christoper Hodgson, M.A.

Source: An Account of the Augmentation of Small Livings by “The Governors of the Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of the Maintenance of the poor Clergy” published in 1856, by Christoper Hodgson, M.A.

Eric Montague, in his Mitcham Histories : 12 Church Street and Whitford Lane, page 107, said that more land was bought in 1762 from Mary Gellibrand.

This OS map of 1867 shows areas marked as ‘Glebe’. Note that the London Road was, as shown on this map, known as Whitford Lane.

1867 OS map

1867 OS map

Later, parts of this land was sold off to developers to build houses. Montague, page 108, ibid., said that in 1790 a substantial plot was sold to build a house which became Glebelands.

In the Land Registry title for a house in Preshaw Crescent for example, a conveyance was made in 1897:

A Conveyance of the land in this title and other land dated 2 September 1897 made between (1) The Reverend Frederick Wilson Clerk (the Incumbent) (2) The Governors of The Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of The Maintenance of The Poor Clergy (the Governors) (3) The Right Reverend Father in God Edward Stuart (the Ordinary) (4) Francis Charles Simpson (the Patron) (5) The Right Honourable and Most Reverend Frederick By Divine Providence Lord Archbishop of Canterbury (the Archbishop) and (6) Richard Arthur Bush (the Purchaser) contains covenants details of which are set out in the schedule of restrictive covenants hereto.

See also Queen Anne’s Bounty on wikipedia.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Preshaw Crescent

Photo taken 2nd January, 2017

Photo taken 2nd January, 2017

Photo possibly taken after the houses were built.

Photo possibly taken after the houses were built.

A row of four pairs of houses from the corner with Glebe Path running west, in parallel with, but set back from, the north side of Lower Green West. Built after 1897 on the site of a pond, which is shown in this 1866 map:

1866 OS map

1866 OS map

According to Eric Montague in his book Mitcham Histories: 5 Lower Green West, page 11, the pond measured 200 feet by 50 feet and had been called King’s Pond. The sub-soil here is sand and gravel and Montague suggested that this was originally a pit dug for the gravel, which would be used in building. With the water table high the pit would have filled in with water forming the pond.


The year of 1897 comes from the Land Registry title for number 6, which was auctioned in early 2016:

A Conveyance of the land in this title and other land dated 2 September 1897 made between (1) The Reverend Frederick Wilson Clerk (the Incumbent) (2) The Governors of The Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of The Maintenance of The Poor Clergy (the Governors) (3) The Right Reverend Father In God Edward Stuart (the Ordinary) (4) Francis Charles Simpson (the Patron) (5) The Right Honourable and Most Reverend Frederick By Divine Providence Lord Archbishop of Canterbury (the Archbishop) and (6) Richard Arthur Bush (the Purchaser) contains covenants details of which are set out in the schedule of restrictive covenants hereto.

The restrictive covenant contained in the conveyance of 2nd September 1897 stated that …

the purchaser would within 12 months of the date of abstracting presents erect not less than 4 detached houses or two pairs of semi detached houses on the premises.

That no buildings other than dwelling houses with their offices should be erected on the premises the prime cost of which for work and materials should not be less than £400 or in case of pairs of semi-detached dwellinghouses should not be less prime cost than £650 per pair.


This 1910 OS map shows the four pairs of houses:

1910 OS Map

1910 OS Map

Occupants

From the 1915 street directory:

Lower green west, from London Road
NORTH SIDE

… here is Glebe Path
PRESHAW CRESCENT:
1, Charles STUART
3, George Henry NELSON
4, Robert CHART
5, Arthur LANGRISH
7, Charles Clarke APLIN
8, John David CLARKE

From the 1925 street directory:

Lower green west, from London Road to Church Road
WEST SIDE

PRESHAW CRESCENT:
1, Charles STUART
2, Miss Bessie May MARTIN
3, George NELSON
4, John William ALLEN
5, Arthur LANGRISH
6, Charles R SINCLAIR
7, Mrs HOLLIS
8, Herbert E HART
9, George W.T. ORMOND

Note that number 9 is possibly the White Cottage.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

White Cottage (Lower Green)

Western end of Preshaw Crescent, Lower Green West.

1953 OS Map

From Mitcham and Tooting Advertiser
4th February 1954

Purchase plan rejected

A proposal that Mitcham Council should buy White Cottage, at Lower Green West has been rejected. The borough engineer (Mr Riley Schofield) reported that to convert the house into two flats would cost £1,150 and the borough treasurer (Mr E.C. Clay) has stated that the capital outlay would be in the region of £3,800. The estimated net annual loss would be £139, of the which the Government would pay £104.