Tag Archives: Seaton Road

Stoker Alfred George Smith

He was born 9th January 1910, and was baptised on 6th March at the Mitcham parish church. In the 1911 census he is shown as living with his parents William John and Martha Ann Smith, both aged 44, at 8 Belgrave Road.

He married 6th June 1931 to Alice Louisa Ferridge at the parish church in Church Road. He was 21, a bricklayer. She was also 21 years old. They both lived at 6 Seaton Road.

Marriage Banns

The 1939 Register shows them living at 20 Dalton Avenue.

He served as a stoker on the H.M.S. Tetcott from December 1941. This was a Type 2 frigate escort ship in Mediterranean. It was anchored outside Malta when Malta was badly bombed.

Sources:
Birth : Surrey History Centre; Woking, Surrey, England; Surrey Church of England Parish Registers
Marriage Banns : Surrey History Centre; Woking, Surrey, England; Reference Number: 3477/4
1939 Register : The National Archives; Kew, London, England; 1939 Register; Reference: RG 101/1373F

1923 : Seaton Road Feuds

From the Norwood News – Tuesday 5th June 1923, via the British Newspaper Archive

GIPSIES’ MELEE.
WHOLESALE SUMMONSES FOLLOW.
AMAZING COURT SCENE.

A feud among gipsy folk living at Seaton road, Mitcham, culminated on Saturday in quite a colony of them appearing at Croydon County Police Court.

They swarmed about the precincts of the Court to the extent that everybody was asking what was the matter.

The full details of the feud or vendetta did not come to light, and the public were disappointed, inasmuch as the story was not told for their benefit.

Evidently something serious happened in Seaton-road on May 19, and the outcome was 19 summonses and cross-summonses for assault. Leonard Dixie and his wife, Britannia Dixie, of Seaton-road, were summoned for assaulting William Smith and Alice May Hudson; Mercy Sparrowhawk, of Portland-road, Mitcham, charged with assaulting Amy Deakins, Britannia Dixie and Leonard Dixie; Phoebe Smith, William Smith, John Smith and William Smith, junior, all summoned for assaulting Leonard Dixie and Britannia Dixie and Thomas Edmund Stevens for assaulting Louisa Stevens, on the 20th.

Louisa Stevens did not appear to charge Thomas Edmund Stevens.

The charge sheet looked so formidable as to almost stagger the sitting magistrates.

Sir Arthur Spurgeon, chairman of the Bench, hit on a happy idea. He got all the parties ranged together on one side of the Court. There they stood in a row, with a crowd of onlookers greatly interested in them.

Mr. Clark, solicitor for some of the parties, said: I would suggest to your Worship that everybody be bound over.

The Chairman : We cannot do that at this stage.

SUMMONED TEN TIMES

Mr. Stanley Gibson said he represented the Dixies, who were summoned ten times and in turn were the prosecutors four times. His friend, Mr. Clark, was in six of the cases, and he must say they were both mystified how to settle the whole business.

The Chairman : How did the trouble originate?

Mr. Gibson : There was a general fight on May 19, and it is the outcome of that.

The Chairman : What led to the fight — a wedding?

Mr Gibson: I could not say.

The Chairman: Or perhaps a funeral?
(Laughter.)

Mr. Gibson : I don’t know.

The Chairman : You don’t know much about it then.

Mr. Gibson: My instructions are that a fight was going on when my clients, the Dixies arrived on the scene. How the original fight started we cannot say.

The Chairman : This is evidently a quarrel amongst families. I don’t know who is to blame, and I suppose if you heard all the cases we should not get to the bottom of it. The result, one pretty well knows, would be to find there were six to one and half-a-dozen to the other. All the lot are mixed up, summoning and cross-summoning one another, and what will be the advantage in the end to any particular party, I fail to see. My suggestion is that they should all shake hands and go home.
(Laughter.)

BYGONES:

The Clerk : That is the best thing, Sir Arthur, and let them bury the hatchet.

Both Mr. Clark and Mr. Gibson intimated they were agreeable to settle the dispute in that way. Meanwhile the parties looked on bewildered.

The Chairman : What do you say, Dixie?

Dixie : I don’t want to punish anybody.

The Chairman : Certainly not ; and you have no objection to shaking hands with these people and letting bygones be bygones?

Dixie (reluctantly): No.

The Chairman: And you, Smith, your are also agreeable to shake hands and let bygones be bygones?

Smith : Yes.

The Chairman : Come on, then, you two shake hands.

Smith approached Dixie and held out his hand. Dixie paused a moment, and then took the outstretched hand in his own.

Mrs. Dixie refused to shake hands with Smith, and indignantly brushed past him.

Alice May Hudson shouted out that she did not agree to a settlement in this way. She handed up to the Bench a doctor’s certificate as to the state of her health.

The Chairman : Of course, the usual bruises, and lost hair. (Laughter.)

Smith said he would take the responsibility for his married daughter, who objected, and withdrew proceedings on her behalf.

The Chairman : Very well, that is the best ending. All the cases are withdrawn.

The ending was so sudden and abrupt that all the parties looked at one another in amazement.

The Court was quickly cleared, but the parties remained about the corridors for a long while after, and there were heated conversations going on.

Lulworth Crescent

New road and housing built on site of the Standard Upholstery factory, 36 Lewis Road, in 1988/9. Planning permission 88/P1640 was approved for the :

redevelopment of site by the erection of 20 no. 3 bed houses 14 no. 1 bed flats and 9 no. 2 bed flats with associated parking and landscaping including construction of new link road between Lewis Road and Portland Road.

The new link road referred became an extension to Portland Road. After the Standard Upholstery company left, its factory buildings was known as the Standard Trading Estate.

Street map of Lulworth Crescent overlaid onto Standard Upholstery factory

Street map of Lulworth Crescent overlaid onto Standard Upholstery factory

Seaton Road

Road on western edge of the Mitcham Gas Works, and north of Fox’s Path.

On the 1952 OS map there are two rows of houses, numbered, from south to north, 1A to 18A on the west side and 1 to 16 on the east side.

On the 1910 OS map, there were two more houses on the east side, at the corner with Portland Road, numbers 17 and 18. These may have sustained bomb damage during World War 2, and were demolished. In 1995, planning permission was approved to build two new houses, numbered 17 and 18.

The road was built around 1902, as shown in the council minutes:

From the minutes of the
Croydon Rural District Council
Roads and Buildings Committee
Volume VIII 1902 – 1903
21st June 1902
page 217

2. Deposited Plans. – The Buildings Sub-Committee reported that they had carefully examined al the plans of new streets and buildings deposited since the last meeting, and on their recommendation, it was Resolved:-
(a) That the undermentioned be approved:
No. 2165, Jordan, T, 18 houses, Seaton Road, Mitcham

and on 20th November 1902
page 572:

No. 2313, Jordan, T, 20 houses, Seaton Road, Mitcham

Maps

1952 OS map

1952 OS map

1932 OS map

1932 OS map

1937 aerial view looking to east. At top of photo is the Mitcham Gas Works. On the right, the footpath is Field Gate Lane. On the bottom of the photo can be seen part of the factory roof of Standard Upholstery.

1937 aerial view looking to east. At top of photo is the Mitcham Gas Works. On the right, the footpath is Fox’s Path. On the bottom of the photo can be seen part of the factory roof of Standard Upholstery.

Occupants from Street Directories
1925

South Side
1, William John SMITH, junior
2, Amos SMITH
3, James ROBINSON
4, Alfred ALLEN
5, Thomas DREWETT
6, Mrs POWELL
7, William W BIRD
8, John CHALLIS
9, George CRESSWELL
10, Bertram YEATES
11, Charles John DOLBY
12, Arthur KING
13, Alfred DEACON
14, Frederick MATTHEWS
15, James WILLCOCK
16, Harry NEW
17, Augustus STANDING
18, A.M. TOLHURST & Sons (grocers)

North Side
1A, John TIBBLES
2A, Henry JAMES
3A, Alfred HUDSON
4A, Leonard DIXIE
5A, Bernard JEWELL
7A, George HATFIELD
8A, Samuel CHAMBERS
9A, Mrs Louisa CRESSWELL
10A, Reginald F. WILLIAMS
11A, Arthur RUSSELL
12A, George CAIN
13A, George Albert BENNETT
14A, Abraham BATES
15A, John COYLE
16A, David LUXSON
17A, Thomas POWELL
18A, Arthur DREW


A total of 30 men from this road joined up in World War 1, with 6 not returning.

Of the six that died, it’s possible that Frederick Matthews lied about his age. On the Surrey Recruitment Register his age is shown as 19 when volunteering on 30th October, 1915, but the Commonwealth War Graves Commission has his age as 20 when he died in March 1918. His elder brother had volunteered on the 3rd June 1915.

The names of the six fallen are on the Mitcham War Memorial.

World War 1 Connections
From the Commonwealth War Graves Commission:

Private H Bennett

Rifleman W E Cook

Private John Hopkins

Private Frederick Matthews

Ordinary Seaman William New

Private James Walsh

From the Surrey Recruitment Registers:

F A BEARD of 7a Seaton Road, aged 24 Years 2 Months, Labourer. Conscripted on 13 June 1917 to the 84th Training Reserve Batn.

G T BUCKFIELD of 5 Seaton Road, aged 21 Years 6 Months, Greengrocer. Joined on 8 March 1917 to the Royal Field Artillery.

S CHAMBERS of 8a Seaton Road, aged 25 Years 7 Months, Labourer. Conscripted on 7 August 1917 to the Labour Centre.

C F CHAPMAN of 6a Seaton Road, aged 30 Years, Carman. Volunteered on 21 April 1915 to the Army Service Corps.

T DEACON of 6a Seaton Road, aged 19 Years, Hawker. Volunteered on 1 November 1915 to the Royal Fusiliers.

J ENEVER of 11a Seaton Road, aged 33 Years 9 Months, Labourer. Volunteered on 6 July 1915 to the Royal West Surrey Regiment.

C H FLINT of 11a Seaton Road, aged 30 Years, Labourer. Conscripted on 25 June 1917 to the 301st Labour Coy (5th Batn).

J W GREEN of 4 Seaton Road, aged 19 Years, Carman. Conscripted on 28 February 1917 to the Royal West Surrey Regiment (labour Coy).

J H HICKS of 1 Seaton Road, aged 45 Years, Painter. Volunteered on 2 June 1915 to the Middlesex Regiment.

D. HOLDFORD of 5 Seaton Road, aged 25 Years 1 Months, Carman.
W. G. HOLDFORD of 5 Seaton Road, aged 23 Years 5 Months, Labourer. Both volunteered on 16 January 1915 to the Royal Field Artillery.

D E LUXON of 16a Seaton Road, aged 25 Years 4 Months, Fitter. Volunteered with the Derby Scheme on 10 December 1915 to the Royal West Kent Regiment (5th Batn).

H MATTHEWS of 14 Seaton Road, aged 26 Years 5 Months, Hawker. Volunteered on 3 June 1915 to the Royal Fusiliers.

F MATTHEWS of 14 Seaton Road, aged 19 Years, Hawker. Volunteered on 30 October 1915 to the Royal Fusiliers.

J PAGE of 15 Seaton Road, aged 27 Years 3 Months, Labourer. Volunteered with the Derby Scheme on 09 December 1915 to the East Kent Regiment (9th Batn).

P J REEVES of 3 Seaton Road, aged 29 Years 7 Months, Carman. Volunteered on 13 March 1915 to the Army Service Corps (ht).

D RILEY of 1a Seaton Road, aged 24 Years 11 Months, Labourer. Conscripted on 26 June 1917 to the 105th Training Reserve Batn.

W RILEY of 1a Seaton Road, aged 31 Years 2 Months, Labourer. Volunteered on 21 December 1915 to the East Surrey Regiment (4th Batn).

W S SELBY of 11 Seaton Road, aged 31 Years, Porter. Conscripted on 7 June 1916 to the Reserve Household Batn.

C SMITH of 3a Seaton Road, aged 20 Years 2 Months, Carman. Volunteered with the Derby Scheme on 1 March 1916 to the Royal Field Artillery.

W SMITH of 3a Seaton Road, aged 23 Years, Labourer. Conscripted on 1 March 1917 to the Royal West Surrey Regiment (labour Coy).

H SMITH of 2 Seaton Road, aged 18 Years 2 Months, Hawker. Conscripted on 2 February 1917 to the 24th Training Reserve Batn.

H SUMMERS of 4 Seaton Road, aged 29 Years 11 Months, Carman. Volunteered on 4 June 1915 to the Royal Field Artillery.

J TIBBLES of 1a Seaton Road, aged 41 Years, Carman. Volunteered on 14 July 1915 to the Army Veterinary Corps.

N F WILLIAMS of 10a Seaton Road, aged 25 Years, Handy Man. Volunteered with the Derby Scheme on 27 March 1916 to the Army Service Corps (mt).


From the Mitcham Urban District Council minutes,
Volume 3, page 120, Finance and General Purposes Committee meeting of 11th September, 1917, Mr Rabbetts reported contraventions under the Shop Act of Mrs H. Evens of 14A, Seaton Road, for serving a customer after closing time. Also Mr Carmino Tortolano of 18, Seaton Road, who at 7.15pm served a customer with pickles.

The 1911 Shops Act dictated the half-day closing of Wednesdays, in order to give staff time off.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.


Minutes of meetings held by the Croydon Rural District Council, and Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.