Tag Archives: Thorold

Rigid rules of the almshouses in old days

Clip from Merton Memories photo, reference Mit_​Almshouses_​1-2, copyright London Borough of Merton. This early drawing shows the original enclosing wall.

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 13th May, 1960, page 3.

TWELVE middle-aged women, protected from the cold winds by woollen capes that reached their ankles, wended their way to Mitcham Parish Church in 1829.

Parishioners who saw the women demurely stepping out each Sunday, knew by their dress that they lived at the newly-erected almshouses at the Cricket Green, Mitcham.

For in 1829 the Tate’s Almshouses were constructed to provide “a residence free from rent, taxes and outgoings for 12 poor women who shall be respectively widows or unmarried women … members of the Church of England and who have a legal settlement in the parish.”

TRUST FUND

For generations the Tate families had been benefactors in the parish and in this early part of the 19th century decided it was time to build houses for the poor and set up a trust fund.

The building, familiar to residents today, was built to designs by a Mr. Buckler on the site of a former house belonging to the Tates who lived nearby. When completed a board of trustees was set up to choose applicants for admission to the house and to organise the administrative side.

These well meaning gentlemen included the Rev. James Henry Mapleton, Vicar of Mitcham, who acted as clerk to the trustees; George Matthew Hoare, of Morden Lodge; Sir John William Lubbock, of Norfolk, and William Simpson, squire in Carshalton.

Each of these ebullient figures invested some money in the project as did the foundress, Mary Tate who gave £5,000.

EXPENSE

The almshouses, whose exterior has altered little, are built in the style prevalent in the latter part of the 16th century and were erected “ at considerable expense.”

For the poor of the parish there was considerable competition to be allocated a room or small flatlet in the almshouses and when, at last, they were successful in gaining admission, there were some fairly rigid rules to be observed.

A copy of the rules was presented by Worthing Public Library to Mitcham Library in the early 1930s.

One of the main stipulations was that the “almswomen” were to be 50 years old and upwards and were not to have received poor relief in the five previous years. They were to be selected by Mary Tate during her life and subsequently by the trustees.

The women forfeited their weekly allowance of three shillings if they remained outside their home for more than 24 hours without official leave.

They were expected to “ behave civilly and orderly and to live orderly and religious lives,” attending the church each week and receiving the sacraments four times each year.

The gates, inset in the high brick wall round the building, were locked at 11 p.m. and an hour earlier during the winter months.

No strangers were allowed into their homes without special permission and on receiving the weekly allowance, the women were “enjoined to discharge all debts contracted in the last week.”

They were also not allowed to keep dogs or alter their apartments without permission.

From this early record, it would seem that the establishment was run on rather austere lines with the matron keeping a book with the names of the women and reporting ” for infraction of the rules ” to the trustees.

The women also benefited from “Smith’s charity.” Smith was an eccentric retired London jeweller who travelled Surrey on foot accompanied by his old dog. He was dubbed “ Dog-smith ” and was reputed to leave sums of money where villages received him well.

Some of the correspondence between William Simpson and Mary Tate, who moved to a country house at Loughborough, shows how the women were chosen to live at the almshouses.

SAME COURSE

In February, 1837, he wrote. . . ” our course at the last vacancy was to give notice of it at church and invite each candidate to send in her grounds of admission to the trustees … if it is your pleasure we should follow the same course on the present occasion, will you do me the honour to communicate with me.”

Then again he wrote to Sir Lubbock asking if he considered it suitable to ask applicants to go to the almshouses 44 when particulars of each case be laid before Miss Tate for her decision on the next vacancy.”

But now a proportion of the old rules have been changed and a recently completed modernisation scheme has resulted in a transformation within the building.

The residents — still all women who have lived in the locality for not less than five years—have had their two-room flatlets redecorated in pleasant light colours. Electric light has been
installed, inside toilets, baths and new gas stoves in some of the apartments.

There is a new roof and drainage system and other renovations completed by a Mitcham firm to make the homes more comfortable.

The women, who now pay a small nominal rent, are chosen by a seven-man committee of trustees. Following former custom. Rev. John Thorold, Vicar of Mitcham, is the ex-officio trustee.

The memory of the Tate family is carried on, however, for there are several tablets and plaques in the parish church commemorating various members of the family.

Among them is a white marble monument erected to George Tate, “a gentleman of aimiable and accomplished manners,” father of the foundress, who died at the age of 77 in May, 1822.

Coats of Arms

This is list of people who either came from Mitcham or had some connection to it, and had their own coat of arms.

Descriptions are from the Surrey History Centre, Surrey Coat of Arms.

BIDDER
BRERETON
CAESAR
CRANMER
ELLINGWORTH
FARRANT
FENTON
FITZWILLIAM
GREENE
HARRINGTON
HEATH
HELLARD
HUNTINGTON
HYGHLORD
ILLINGWORTH
MALLABY-DEELEY
OAKES
PONTIFEX
ROBINSON
ROTLAND
RUTLAND [ROUTHLAND]
RUTLAND
SHERMAN
SIMPSON
SMITH
STANLEY
STAPLES
THOMSON
THOROLD
WATNEY
WORSFOLD


BIDDER

George Parker Bidder, JP, QC, MA (Cantab), of Ravensbury Park, Mitcham, bencher and barrister-at-law, Lincoln’s Inn, (1836-96), was father of Lieutenant-Colonel Harold Francis Bidder, DSO, JP, MA (Cantab), FSA, of Ravensbury Manor, Mitcham, (b.1875), who had issue George Parker Bidder, (b.1920), and Alan Mortimer McClean Bidder, (b.1921).

Arms: Chequy Argent and Azure on a chief Sable a four-winged thunderbolt Or between two horseshoes of the first.

Crest: A sinister arm embowed vested Azure cuffed and charged on the sleeve with a saltire Argent the hand holding a scroll Proper.

Motto: Ne tentes aut perfice. (FD7)


BRERETON

of Mitcham.
Arms: Argent two bars Sable, a crescent for difference.
Crest: A bear head erased Sable muzzled Or, charged with a crescent for difference.
As borne (SV1623) by Theophilus Brereton, (d.Dec 5, 1638), of Mitcham, son of Richard Brereton, 2nd son of Thomas Brereton of Henley-in-Arden, Warwickshire, 2nd son of Sir Randall Brereton of Malpas, Cheshire.


CAESAR

Sir Julius Caesar, Master of the Rolls, (1558-1636), acquired property at Mitcham by marriage, 1582, to Dorcas, widow of Richard Lusher, and daughter of Sir Richard Martin, Alderman of London and Master of the Mint, and entertained Queen Elizabeth I there 1598.
(DNB, VCHS iv 229)
Arms: Gules three roses Argent on a chief of the second as many roses of the first.
Crest: A dolphin embowed Proper in the sea Vert. (BGA)


CRANMER

Robert Cranmer, (d.1665), bought Mitcham Canons 1656. It descended in the family until the death, spm. 1801, of James
Cranmer; his daughter Esther Maria married Captain Richard Dixon, 85th Regiment, who assumed the name and arms of Cranmer.
Arms: Argent on a chevron Purpure between three pelicans Azure as many cinquefoils Or. (VCHS iv 231)
See also SIMPSON.


ELLINGWORTH

of Mitcham.
Arms: Argent a fess flory counterflory between three escallops Sable. (BGA)


FARRANT

of Mitcham.
Arms: Argent on a chief Gules two crosses patonce Vair, a crescent for difference.
Crest: A cubit arm erect vested Vair cuffed Argent, the hand Proper holding a battle-axe in bend sinister of the second, the sleeve
charged with a crescent for difference.
As borne (SV1623) by Richard Farrant of Mitcham, son of William Farrant, DCL


FENTON

Fairbairn records Ferrar Fenton, FRAS, FCAA of 8 King’s Road, Mitcham, as using for
Crest: Out of a ducal coronet an arm embowed in armour Or holding in the hand a sword Argent hilted of the first.
Motto: Mon hieur viendra. (FBC)


FITZWILLIAM

of Mitcham.

Arms: Lozengy Argent and Gules.
Crest: Out of a ducal coronet Or a triple plume of ostrich feathers Argent.
From the brass in Tooting Graveney Church to William FitzWilliam, (d.Jul 17, 1597), of Mitcham, and his wife, Elizabeth, (d.1582), daughter of .. Harrington. (SAC xxxiii 12)


GREENE

of Mitcham.

Baronet, Nov. 2, 1664. Extinct 1671.
Arms: Per pale Azure and Sable three bucks trippant Or.
Crest: A buck head couped Argent attired Or gorged with a coronet per pale Azure and Sable.
Granted by Bysshe, Clarenceux, to William Greene, Jan 6, 1663. (SAC iii 350)


HARRINGTON

The arms of Harrington are impaled by FitzWilliam, on a monument in Tooting Graveney Church; William FitzWilliam, of Mitcham, (d.1597), married Elizabeth, (d.1582), widow of William Dymoke, (d.1549), and daughter of Sir John Harrington * of Exton, Rutland, (d.1553).
Arms: Sable a fret Argent.
Crest: A lion’s head erased Or collared Gules buckled Gold.
* (VCHS iv 104) records [Sir] James Harrington, presumably Sir John’s son, as buying the manor of Tooting Graveney from Sir Edward Dymoke, 1593, and selling it, 1595, to Sir Henry Maynard.


HEATH

of Limpsfield.
Arms: Argent a cross raguly between twelve billets Gules.
As borne in 1623 by Robert Heath of Dartford, Kent, and Sir Robert Heath of Mitcham, grandsons of Robert Heath of Limpsfield, son of John Heath of Limpsfield. (MB ii 395) *
* Burke records the following for Heath of Brasted, Kent, and of Lyndsfield, (sic) and Tandridge.
Arms: Argent a cross engrailed between twelve billets Gules.
Crest: A wolf’s head erased per pale Sable and Or ducally gorged Argent holding in the mouth a broken spear of the second headed of the third. (BGA)


HELLARD

of Mitcham, also of Cornwall.
Arms: Sable a bend flory Argent. (BGA)


HUNTINGTON

David Charles Huntington of Oaktree Cottage, Wormley, (b.1938), elder son of Lieutenant-Colonel Arthur Charles Huntington, MVO, Grenadier Guards, (1908-44), and descended from James Huntington of Mitcham, (1801-81).
Arms: Or on a pale between two roses Gules barbed and seeded Proper a lion rampant between two water bougets of the field.
Crest: Upon a mount Vert a lion’s head Or gorged with a collar Vair between roses barbed seeded leaved and stalked Proper.
Motto: In veritate Victoria. (BLG18)


HYGHLORD

alias HELLARD of Mitcham, also of Devon.
Arms: Sable a bend flory Argent.
Crest: A ship in full sail in a sea all Proper. (BGA)


ILLINGWORTH

of Mitcham.
Arms: Argent a cross flory Gules between three escallops Sable.
From brasses in Mitcham Church to Richard Illingworth, (d.1511), and to Ralph Illingworth, (d.1572). (SAC xxx 94)

But at (SV1530), William Illingworth of Mitcham, is recorded, possibly in error, as bearing Argent a fess flory and counterflory Gules between three escallops Sable.

Crest. Burke gives for Illingworth, of Surrey: Within a crescent Argent a cock crowing Sable. (BGA)


MALLABY-DEELEY

Sir Harry Mallaby Mallaby-Deeley, 1st Bart., JP, MA, LL.M (Cantab), of Mitcham Court, (1863-1937), was created Baronet 1922. The title expired on the death, 1962, of his grandson Sir Anthony Meyrick Mallaby-Deeley, 3rd Bart., of Slater’s Oak, Effingham.

Arms: Quarterly, 1 and 4, Sable a chevron engrailed Ermine between in chief two fleurs-de-lys and in base a crescent Or (Deeley); 2 and 3, Or a bunch of nettles Proper and a chief Sable (Mallaby).

Crests: 1, A sinister cubit arm in armour gauntleted holding in the hand a dagger point downwards Proper pommel and hilt Or between two spurs Gold (Deeley); 2, Issuant from clouds Proper a demi Pegasus Argent winged and charged on the shoulder with a fleur-de-lys Azure.

Motto: Quod Deus vult. (BP99)


OAKES

of Mitcham Hall, Bart.,

Arms: Argent on a chevron engrailed Sable between three sprigs of oak fructed Proper a cross of eight points of the field on a canton Gules a mullet of as many points within an increscent of the first.

Crest: Out of a mural crown Gules a buck’s head erased Proper gorged with a collar embattled counter-embattled Or.

Motto: Persevere. (BGA)


PONTIFEX

William Pontifex of Grove Lodge, Mitcham, later of Cheshunt, Hertfordshire, and of London, merchant, (1766-1851), had issue, a 2nd son William Pontifex of Chichester, {Sussex} and London, (1793-1870), who was father of, amongst others, William Pontifex of Denbighs, Haslemere, and of Chilworth Manor. Arms: Azure in base barry of four Argent and of the first a bridge of three arches embattled Proper and a chief of the second thereon two pallets between as many mullets of the field.

Crest: A tower Proper charged with a cross moline Azure surmounted by a rainbow also Proper.

Motto: In hoc signo vinces. (BFR; FD7)


ROBINSON

Major-General Sir Charles Walker Robinson, KCB, the Rifle Brigade, (1836-1924), 4th son of Sir John Beverley Robinson, 1 st Bart., of Beverley House, Toronto, (1791-1863), was at one time of Beverley House, Mitcham Common. The family formerly bore: Arms: Per chevron Vert and Azure on a chevron nebulé between three stags trippant Or an unicorn’s head couped between two cinquefoils of the first. Crest: A stag trippant Or semé of lozenges Azure and resting the dexter forefoot on a millrind Sable. Motto: Properè et providè. (BP58; FBC) The family now bears: Arms: Or on a chevron between three stags trippant Vert as many cinquefoils of the field. Crest: A stag trippant Vert bezanté. Motto: As above. {Properè et providè} (BP105; FD7)


ROTLAND

of Surrey.

Arms: Or on a fess between three boars’ heads erect and erased Gules as many spearheads of the first. Crest: A nag’s head Or erased per fess Gules maned of the last. (BGA) Burke also gives this crest for Rutland, or Roushland, of Mitcham, qv, as does Fairbairn. (FBC)


RUTLAND [ROUTHLAND]

of Mitcham.

Arms: Gules and inescutcheon Or all within a bordure of the second. Crest: A horse head Or, erased and maned Gules. * As borne by Nicholas Rutland, son of Nicholas Rutland, son of Francis Rutland, son of Nicholas Rutland of Mitcham, (d.1582), Clerk of the Catry, son of Francis Rutland, son of William Rutland of Canterbury, Kent, son of .. Rutland, alias Routhland of Essex. (Harl. Ms 1561, fo 54b) * Burke gives for Rutland, or Roushland, of Mitcham: Arms: Gules an orle engrailed on the inner side Or a bordure also engrailed of the last. Crest: A nag’s head Or erased per fess Gules maned of the last. (BGA)


RUTLAND

Frederick William Rutland, of Mitcham. Arms: Or an orle engrailed on the inner side Gules between eight estoiles in orle Azure. Crest: A horse’s head erased Sable semé of annulets Or in the mouth a branch of fern Proper. Motto: Post proelia proemia. (BGA)


SHERMAN

of Mitcham.

Arms: Or a lion rampant Sable between three holly leaves Vert a mullet for difference. Crest: A demi-lion rampant couped Sable holding in his dexter paw a sprig of holly Vert. From the monument in Mitcham Church to Bazaleel Sherman, (d.Aug 25, 1670), merchant of London. (MB ii 503)


SIMPSON

The Simpson family acquired Mitcham Canons by the marriage of William Simpson, of Lichfield, {Staffordshire}, to Emily, daughter of Captain Richard Dixon, post Cranmer, qv; William F J Simpson was Lord of the Manor in 1912. Arms: Per bend sinister Or and Sable a lion rampant counterchanged holding between the paws a gauntlet Azure. Crest: An ounce’s head Proper erased and ducally crowned Gules charged on the neck with a gauntlet Or. (VCHS iv 231; BGA)


SMITH

of Mitcham.

Arms: Argent on a chevron engrailed Azure between three greyhound heads erased Sable collared Gules as many estoiles Or. Crest: A stag head couped Gules attired Argent. * As borne (SV1623) by George and Thomas Smith, both of Mitcham, sons of Thomas Smith of Mitcham. * Burke gives this as: Arms: Argent on a chevron engrailed Azure between three greyhounds’ heads erased Sable collared Or ringed Gules as many estoiles (another mullets) of the fourth. Crest: A stag’s head erased Gules attired Argent. (BGA)


STANLEY

Earl of Derby. Sir Thomas Stanley, KG, Lord Stanley, (c.1405-59), acquired a share in the manor of Dorking by marriage to Joan, daughter and coheir of Sir Robert Goushill of Hoveringham, Nottinghamshire, by his wife Elizabeth, (d.1425), widow of Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, (d.1399), and daughter of Richard FitzAlan, Earl of Arundel, (executed 1397). His son Thomas, 1st Earl of Derby, (c 1435-1504), acquired half the manor of Reigate, which was sold in 1600 after the death, spm, 1594, of Ferdinando, 5th Earl of Derby. In 1759, Sir Edward Stanley, 5th Bart., 11th Earl of Derby, (1689-1776), acquired the lease of Lambert’s Oaks, Mitcham, which his grandson Edward, 12th Earl of Derby, (1752-1834), bought in 1788. * The 17th Earl of Derby was one of the principal landowners in Thursley in 1920. (VCHS iii 59, 144-6, 235-6, iv 247) Arms: Argent on a bend Azure three stags’ heads cabossed Or. Crest: On a chapeau Gules turned up Ermine an eagle wings extended Or preying on an infant in its cradle Proper swaddled Gules the cradle laced Gold. Supporters: Dexter, A griffin wings elevated; Sinister, A stag; both Or and each ducally collared with line reflexed over the back Azure. Motto: Sans changer. (BP105) * “He used the house as a hunting and racing box, and the famous sweepstakes whence the Derby and the Oaks originated were founded there”. (VCHS)


STAPLES

Roger Staples of The Close, Salisbury, {Wiltshire},(1694-1745), had issue, amongst others, an eldest son Roger Staples, JP, of Mitcham Hall, a London banker, (dsp. 1778), and a 2nd son Charles Staples of London, (b.1728), who was father of, amongst others, Moses William Staples, of Norwood, banker and alderman of London, (1762-1802). His son, Moses William Staples of Norwood, and of Broughton Gifford, Wiltshire, (1786-1864), married, 1811, Anne, daughter of the Rev. William Frederick Browne of Launton, Oxfordshire, and coheir of her brother Captain William Frederick Browne, of Launton and North Berwick. Their eldest son Richard Thomas Staples-Browne of Launton, (1814-55), assumed the additional name and arms of Browne on succeeding to Launton, 1842. Arms: Quarterly, 1 and 4, Ermine on a bend Azure between two fleurs-de-lys Gules three leopards’ heads jessant-de-lys Or (Staples); 2 and 3, Sable a bend engrailed Ermine on a chief Argent an escallop Gules between two torteaux (Browne). Crests: 1, Out of a crown vallary Argent a lion’s head affronté Gules semé-de-lys and ducally crowned Or (Staples); 2, An eagle displayed sable wings fretty resting each claw on a mullet Or (Browne). Motto: Sans Dieu rien. (BLG5)


THOMSON

Fairbairn records W W Thomson of Hill Farm, Mitcham, as using for Crest: On a chapeaux Proper a sword in pale point upwards between two wings. (FBC)


THOROLD

Lieutenant-Colonel Hayford Douglas Thorold, CBE, West Riding Regiment, of East Clandon, (1861-1934), was son of Major-General Reginald Gother Thorold, RE, (1837-1928), and descended from Sir John Thorold, 9th Bart., (1734-1815), who was ancestor also of the Rev. John Robert Hayford Thorold, MA (Cantab), Vicar of Mitcham, (b.1916), elder son of the Rev. Ernest Hayford Thorold, CB, CBE, MA, DD (Oxon), (1879-1940), Chaplain of the Tower of London, 1931-38. Arms: Sable three goats salient Argent. Crest: A roebuck passant Argent attired Or. Motto: Cervus non servus. (BP105; FD7)


WATNEY

Daniel Watney of Wimbledon, (1705-80), was grandfather of Daniel Watney of Mitcham, (1771-1831), Master of the Mercers Company, 1816, who married, 1792, Mary, (d.1830), eldest daughter of James Galpin of Galpins, Mitcham, and sister and coheir of Captain James Galpin, 54th Regiment. Many of his descendants were Masters of the Mercers’ Company, including his eldest son Daniel Watney, (1799-1874); his 2nd son James Watney of Haling Park and Beddington, (1800-84), father of James Watney of Beddington, (1832-86), Master, 1879; and his 3rd son John Watney of Mitcham, (1804-75), father of Sir John Watney, JP, FSA, of Shermanbury House, Reigate, (1834-1923), Clerk of the Mercers’ Company, 1875-1906, whose 2nd son Stephen Cecil Watney of Chaldon Mead, Merstham, (1868-1954), was Master, 1920, and whose 3rd son Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Frank Dormay Watney, KCVO, CBE, TD, DL, of The Little Boltons and of Copleys, Reigate, (b.1870), was Clerk to the Company, 1919-40. Of the same family, Dendy Watney of Rothesay, Gower Road, Weybridge, (b.1865), was younger son of Daniel Watney of Ventnor, Isle of Wight, (b.1835). Arms: Quarterly, 1 and 4, Azure a cross engrailed Ermine in the first and fourth quarters a dove Argent and in the second and third a garb Or (Watney); 2 and 3, Quarterly Argent and Or a cross fleuretté Gules in the first and fourth quarters a lion rampant of the last charged with three bars of the second (Galpin). Crest: On a mount Vert in front of a garb erect Or a greyhound courant Sable gorged with a collar therefrom pendent a bugle-horn Gold. Mottoes: Virtute et industria. (BLG18) Vive ut vivas. (FBC)


WORSFOLD

Sir Thomas Cato Worsfold, 1st and last Bart., DL, JP, MA, LL.D (TCD), of The Hall Place, Mitcham, solicitor, (d.1936), son of William Worsfold of The Hall Place, was MP for Mitcham, 1918-23, and was created Baronet, 1924. Arms: Argent on a mount Vert a beacon fired between three lambs Proper. Crest: Within a crown palisado Or a shepherd’s hound Proper. Motto: I watch the fold. (DPB1936)