Tag Archives: Bath Tavern

Mount Rovers F.C.

Football club, Mount Road and area.

From the Norwood News, 22nd July, 1960

MOUNT Rovers F.C. have decided in future the players’ shorts and socks will he provided by the Club to improve smartness on the field.

There are still one or two vacancies for good class players to join the club, whose first eleven is in the Premier Division of the Morden and District Sunday League.

The Reserve XI is the only second-strmg team to be placed as high as the first division of the same league.

Applications should he sent to the secretary, Mr. H. T. Mount,
7, Mount Road, Mitcham, Surrey.

From the Norwood News, 10th August 1962

Mount Rovers annual meeting

At Mount Rovers annual meeting at the Bath Tavern, Mitcham, the officers were elected as follows: Mr A. Hanney, chairman; Mr H. Mount, secretary; Mr A. Brier, assistant secretary; Mr E. R. Mount, treasurer.

Three teams will be put out next season, all competing in the Morden and District Sunday League.

A letter was read from the president (Mr G. Arnold) stating that he intended to award annually a trophy to the player or official whom by secret vote was deemed to be outstanding.

The secretary H. Mount suggested that a committee be formed to cater for any increase of membership that might arise in view of the area in which their football ground was situated (Phipps Bridge) being redeveloped. This was agreed.

1879 : A Question of Sobriety

From the Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 03 May 1879 via the British Newspaper Archive

A QUESTION OF SOBRIETY.—PUBLICAN’S AMENITIES.

— At the Croydon Petty Sessions on Saturday, Mr. Parkes Hope, landlord of the Bath Tavern Mitcham, was summoned for serving intoxicated persons with liquor on his premises on the 16th April; and Alfred Stevens, James Stevens, and Joseph Munt were summoned for being found drunk on the premises. Mr. Dennis appeared for the defendants.

— P.-c. 382 W stated that on the 14th April he was on duty in Church-road, Mitcham, when he saw James Stevens drunk and incapable. He also saw Alfred Stevens and Joseph Munt, who were drunk, but not incapable. The two latter were supporting James Stevens between them. Witness saw them enter the Star beerhouse, Church-road, and heard them call for beer. Mr. Chapman, the landlord, however, refused to serve them. They then proceeded to Rock-terrace, and he saw them enter the Bath Tavern. Alfred Stevens called for a pot of beer, and was served by the landlord. Witness saw Alfred Stevens and Munt drink from the pot. A disturbance arose between them, and Alfred Stevens and Munt dragged James Stevens from the bar, and after great difficulty succeeded in getting him home. Witness told the landlord that he should have to report the case, when Mr. Hope replied that he had drawn the beer himself, but did not know that the parties were drunk when they came in.

— William Chapman, landlord of the Star beerhouse, gave evidence as to the elder defendant, James Stevens, coming into his house alone on the evening in question. He was very drunk, and witness refused to serve him, and tried to get him out of the house. While he was doing Alfred Stevens and Munt came into the house, and assisted him in getting the old man out of the house. —Neither Alfred Stevens nor Munt were intoxicated.

— Mr. Dennis said his answer to the case was that on the day in question the younger Stevens drove his master to Thames Ditton, and on his return to Mitcham learnt that his father, who was upwards of 70 years of age, was in the Star beerhouse, drunk. He went there and got his father out, and was assisted by Munt in getting him home. On their way, having to pass the Bath Tavern, they went in, and having placed the old man on a seat, they called for a pot of beer, which the two drank between them, but the old man did not have a drop.

— Mr. Hope, landlord of the Bath Tavern, Alfred Stevens, and several others were called as witnesses, and their evidence confirming the above statement, James Stevens was fined 10s. and 7s. costs. The other summonses were dismissed.

1960 : Explosion showers acid over homes

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 15th January, 1960, page 1.

Explosion hurls vat top through roof of factory

ACID IS SHOWERED OVER HOMES
And two boys at play are covered

Acid showered over homes in the Batsworth Road, Mitcham, area on Friday after an explosion in a factory nearby.

The explosion hurled the top of a vat through the factory roof. A stream of acid followed and firemen were called to hose it from homes and the street.

The factory is W.J. Bush, synthetic chemists, Batsworth Road, scene of an explosion in 1933 whiched wrecked and damaged nearby homes, and killed a child. People in the neighbourhood have never forgotten it.

Mystery

Friday’s explosion remains a mystery. The fac†ory would make no comment.

It happened in the evening as Mr Albert Bowdery, who lives nearby, went to buy some tobacco.

“I heard the bang and thought at first that a tower was going to fall, then I saw something rush through the roof.

“I hurried back indoors and called to my daughter-in-law: ‘Quick, the children.’ We ran with them into the road. It would not take much to make this old building collapse.”

Mr Bowdery’s daughter-in-law Violet, has two young children – John and Linda.

Mr Bowdery said: “The explosion reminded people of the 1933 incident. They are always a bit worried about the factory.

“We don’t know what goes on there.”

The shop of greengrocer Mrs L. Langridge was covered in a “sort of white wash.”

“We are still cleaning up. A pair of my overalls are ruined. We could not let the children play outside.”

A nearby butcher, Mr J. Stopher, said: “The sanitary people inspected my goods, and, to be on the safe side, I have handed over a quantity of lamb, although it was not contaminated as far as we can tell. The damage was done to the outside of my shop.”

An elderly painter said: “We worry about the factory because many of us remember the tragedy of 1933.”

Soon after the explosion Michael Fullick and his brother Norman went out to play. They became covered in the acid.

Baths

“When we found out we gave them baths immediately,” said mr F. Fullick, licensee of the Bath Tavern.

Firemen were given rubber gloves when they arrived at the factory. A works chemist gave them advice on how to deal with the spilt sulphuric acid.

1889 Dog stolen from landlord of the Bath Tavern

MITCHAM.

Strange Proceedings.

—At the Town Hall, Croydon, on Saturday, Charles Dawson, was charged with wilfully breaking the gate and entering the yard the rear of the Bath Tavern, Belgrave-road, Mitcham, and with stealing therefrom a lurcher bitch and dog collar on Jan. 17th, valued at £1, the property of Joseph Gilbert, the landlord.

—Prosecutor said defendant had been a customer of his. The dog was loose in his garden on the 17th. and gone the next morning. The value of the bitch was £1. He knew it originally belonged to defendant. Joseph Omigold said on the night of the 17th he met defendant, who said prosecutor had his dog in his yard, and he meant to get it. He then deliberately pulled down the gate, and went in the yard and fetched the dog out

Defendant: The dog of no value; it is big and good for nothing, like the landlord.

—P-.c. 476 W said he apprehended defendant his home on Friday evening. He said I had known I would not have sent the old woman round with the dog this morning.”

—Defendant was remanded for a week so that some arrangement might be made with the prosecutor to the repair of the gate.

Source: Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 26 January 1889 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

1886 Inquest

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 05 June 1886

INQUEST.

—Mr. W. P. Morrison, district coroner held inquiry at the Bath Tavern, Thursday, touching the death Richard John Johnson, aged two years, whose parents reside at 4, Bath-road, Mitcham. From the evidence it appears that the deceased had from his birth suffered from bronchial affection. On Monday evening the child became worse, when Dr. Love was sent for, and after prescribing for the child he said he would call see it in the morning. Before he could attend the next morning he was informed that the child had died. Subsequently he found that the child had suffered from acute bronchial congestion.

—On the evidence the doctor the jury found verdict of “Death from natural causes.”