Tag Archives: Spencer Road

Husband and wife killed in air raid in firm’s basement in London

From Norwood News – Friday 17 January 1941, page 2

HUSBAND AND WIFE KILLED IN RAID
Took Shelter at Premises Bombed in London

Mr. and Mrs F. J. Roberts, Spencer-road, Mitcham, have been the victims of enemy action.

They were in the habit of sheltering in the basement of Mr. Roberts’ business premises in London, and when these were bombed, both Mr. and Mrs. Roberts were killed. Mr. Roberts was well-known and respected in Mitcham.

He was secretary of the penny-a-week collection scheme on behalf of Wilson Hospital, succeeding Mr. Allen, the founder. In this capacity Mr. Roberts rendered good service, and his efforts were much appreciated.

The Commonwealth War Grave Commission casualty record for Francis James Roberts, aged 46, his wife Mary Roberts, aged 48, and their son David Iowerth Roberts, aged 15, states that their address was at 19, Spencer Road, and that they died on 11th January 1941 in the premises of Elder & Fyffes, Bow Street. This company imported bananas, and was renamed the Fyffes Group in 1969, according to Grace’s Guide to British Industrial History.

The 1939 register shows that Mr F.J. Roberts was a Printing Dept Supervisor at the firm.

1929 : Lonesome School teachers in car crash

MOTORING THRILL.

Mitcham Teachers in Fall Over Embankment.

Two young members of the teaching staff at Lonesome School, Mitcham, had an extraordinary adventure after leaving the school on Tuesday afternoon.

Shortly before five p.m. a Baby Austin saloon car in which they were riding crashed through the stout wooden fence on the eastern corner of the Bee Hive railway bridge and plunged down the very steep embankment on to the small plot of waste ground at the rear of the new houses in Spencer-road.

The car reached the bottom of the embankment, estimated to be seventeen feet in depth, right side up, fortunately.

The teachers were Miss Ivy Green, aged twenty-three, of 61, Elsted-street, Walworth, who was driving, and Miss Mary Runnacuss, aged twenty-one, of Defoe-road, Tooting. The car belonged to Miss Smythe, of 21, Tunney-road, East Dulwich, the well known and popular head mistress of Lonesome School, who was severely injured herself in a motor accident some time ago at Eastfields level crossing. She had lent her car to her two assistants for an hour while Miss Green was learning to drive. Miss Runnacuss was her instructress.
Neither of the girls was hurt in the least and scarcely suffered from shock. The only damage to the car was a smashed wind-screen.

Mr. George Mountain, of Smith’s Buildings, Commonside East, road foreman in the employ of the Urban Council, told the “Advertiser” that he saw the car crossing the bridge as a motor lorry was ascending from Grove-road. “The motorists,” he said, “evidently caught sight of the lorry as they turned into Grove-road, made a big swerve to avoid it and crashed through the fence doing so. If their car had struck the lamp-post inside the fence it must have turned turtle. I rushed to help the girls and thought they must certainly be seriously injured, but to my great astonishment both were calmly sitting in the car, and actually smiling! They displayed great nerve and coolness all through.”

Another witness said Miss Green remarked : ” I am glad the old ‘bus did not turn over at any rate.”

Half a dozen men, with Mr. Mountain, assisted the girls to get the car out of the “rough” into the narrow passage between the end house occupied-by Mr. and Mrs. Hayne, No. 1. Spencer-road, and the bottom of the embankment. The girls then drove it away. Miss Green gaily waving her hand to her helpers as she left!

A larger car could not have been got out of the well formed by the embankment and the houses, except with the aid of a crane.

Both teachers returned to duty at Lonesome School next morning, but the head mistress had to drive a motor cycle instead of her Austin seven.

Mitcham Advertiser, 17th October, 1929, page 6

Spencer Road

Road north of Commonside East, on the eastern side of the railway past Beehive Bridge.

1895 OS map

1895 OS map

In the 1891 street directory, it was described as Spencer’s Road:

from Mitcham common to Queen’s road

SOUTH SIDE

G. Jordan, florist & nurseryman
Mrs. Shaw, shopkeeper
William Henry Peters

NORTH SIDE

1 William Thomas Godwin
2 James Dell
3 Alfred Bennett
5 William Rooke
6 William Ambrose
7 E. Simmons
14 Benjamin Craig

1910 OS map

1910 OS map

Occupants in the 1915 street directory:

from Commonside east to King’s Road

SOUTH SIDE

James Crisp, florist
James Rice (Ivy Cottage)
Frederick Cooper (Rose Cottage)
Frederick J. Goddard (Spencer Cottage)

Spencer Terrace:

1 George Brooker
2 George Brown
3 William George Atterbury
4 Charles Tanner
5 H.E. Judd
6 George Holder
7 Frederick Reynolds
8 Leonard Jenner

NORTH SIDE

1 William John Ambrose
2 James Thomas Lardner
3 Mrs Lardner
4 William Henry Brightwell
5 Albert Ward
6 William Towers
7 William Reed
8 George Towers
9 George Lardner
10 Edward Weller
11 Edwin Kenett Deacon
12 Albert Henry Sturtivant
13 William King
14 James Crisp, florist
15 Thomas Kirby, sen
16 George Jordan
17 Arthur Batten
18 Walter Penegar
19 Percy Tremlett
20 Robert Frederick Munday

Clifton Terrace

7 Ernest Blake
8 Carl Lindquist
9 Frederick Charles Bowley
10 Joseph Kilby

World War 1 Connections
Private Harry Charles Eley Lardner


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Levi White

In 1886, Levi White started as Inspector of Nuisances for the Croydon Rural Sanitary Authority, replacing Thomas Matthews who resigned the previous year.

In 1887 he was given a tricycle for his visits, and he made 253 to the dairies and cowsheds in the District. In 1888 he was paid a salary of £2 10s. a week.

In 1891 he lived at number 9, Queen’s Road, which was later renamed Kings Road.

According to the 1900 Electoral Register, when he lived at Orchard House, Wood Street, Beddington Corner, he owned houses in numbers 5 to 10 Kings Road and 11 to 20 Spencer Road.

He was Chief Sanitary Inspector for 29 years up to his death in March 1932.