Tag Archives: Tonstall Road

Tonstall Road

Road that runs from the east side of Lansdell Road to Laburnum Road.

1953 OS map

News Articles

Mitcham News & Mercury, 22nd November, 1957

LANDOWNER FIGHTS COUNCIL

Compulsory purchase order is ‘unjust and unfair’

He stands to lose 900 pounds

A 75 year old man battled with Mitcham Council on Wednesday In an attempt to prevent them compulsorily purchasing his land.

Under the Housing Act of 1957 the council have made a compulsory purchase order for a small plot of ground – now used as allotments at the junction of Tonstall Road and Lansdell Road, Mitcham.

But Mr Leonard H. Munday, a retired council officer, appealed against their decision at a public enquiry on Wednesday.

Mr Munday said he thought the council were unjust and unfair. “As a result of their actions I may be deprived of some of my savings that I shall need in my old age” he added.

Mr Arthur Gadd, counsel for Mr Munday said he would be losing £900 by the deal. Mr William Roots, who represented the council said the land will be used as a building site for 8 houses for old people.

“There is a substantial waiting list for this type of accommodation. The availability of land for this purpose Is extremely limited, and this particular site is near all the amenities that old people need,” he said.

“The council regard the provision of houses for old people as a vital service,” he said.

Mr Riley Schofield, the Borough Engineer, told the Ministry of Housing inspector (Mr F. Greaves) that there were more than 340 people waiting for this type of housing. About 173 on the council list and the remainder in houses that were too large for them – “they’re waiting to be moved,” he said.

“Without weighing the scales at all, isn’t it true to say that there is as much need for houses for ordinary people?” asked Mr Gadd.

He decided to sell

Mr Gadd explained that his client bought the land in 1934 hoping to build a house on it for himself. Later he intended building two further houses and letting them.

But the war ended his plans as building costs increased. So he allowed local residents to use the land as allotments without charge.

Mr Munday then decided to sell the land and this year we were met with a building contracting firm in Tolworth.

Mr Philip Ferrer, a director and surveyor for the firm, said they proposed to build 2 semi-detached houses and four terraced houses on the site.

“When my application to build was made I did not know about the council’s proposed compulsory order. I did not know they were even interested in the land,” he commented.

“The real claim is for some compensation,” said Mr. Roots. we can express our sympathy to Mr Munday but we cannot give anything more concrete.”

Mr Munday will lose money if the council allowed to go ahead with their plans because fixed payments will be decided by the District valuer. The compulsory purchase order was made on July 18, but Mr Munday will have to wait several months before he is notified of the Minister of Housing’s final decision.

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Lansdell Road

Possibly named after Reverend F. J. Lansdell who was the mission clergyman at the ‘School Church’, in St Marks Road, in 1891 – according to Eric Montague in his Mitcham Histories : 7 The Upper or Fair Green, page 110.

Alfred Lansdell Mizen was born in Mitcham in July 1904, according to a family tree webpage.

The road runs from the junction with Locks Lane and Eastfields Road, southward to St Marks Road.

1952 OS Map

The houses are number even on the west side of the road, starting at 2 near the St marks Road end. Between numbers 32 and 34 is Feltham Road. A terrace of six houses numbered 34 to 44 is followed by a detached building which has a datestone on which is ‘Lansdell House 1901’. This building is currently divided into four dwellings numbered 46 to 52. Then there are two terraces of five houses each numbered 54 to 62 and 64 to 72.

On the east side of the road, the houses are numbered odd, starting at no. 15 which is in a block of four houses to number 21. The next block is also four houses numbered from 23 to 29, followed by a block of six houses numbered 31 to 41. This is followed by a block of five houses, 43 to 51, then a block of four from 53 to 59, then two houses 61 and 63. Then a block of four from 65 to 71, and a block of two houses 73 and 74, followed by Tonstall Road. The even numbered houses all have the postcode CR4 2JE and the odd have CR4 2JF.


In the 1891 street directory, described as heading north from St Marks Road to Locks Lane, the occupants were:

from St Mark’s road to Lock’s lane

EAST SIDE

Alexandra Terrace:
1, Walter William SMITH
2, William STANLEY
3, James Dundas HILL
4, Edwin COX
5, George William LAWRENCE
6, Samuel COUSINS

WEST SIDE

Walgrave Terrace:
1, Arthur EVERETT
2, Jacob NORRIS
3, William HOPKINS
4, Charles NEWING
5, Charles WILLIAMSON
6, Miss MIZEN
7, Thomas BAKER
8, Mrs EXCELL
9, Thomas BELBIN
10, Edward ARTHUR
11, George WHITTINGHAM
12, John HUMPHREYS
13, Charles SCHNEIDER
14, Arthur MORRIS
15, Arthur CLINCH
16, Thomas TURNER

— here is Feltham road

Victoria Terrace:
1, Edward SALMON
2, Alfred STENNING
3, Edward GARDENER
4, Avis ETHERINGTON
5, Albert HARRISON
6, John TILLEY

The 1904 street directory has James WHITE and John BLACKMAN living at Lansdell House, and the 1922 electoral register shows four dwellings, the occupants were:

1, Edith and Thomas BURFOOT; John Rumbold SHERMAN
2, Harry SIMS; John BLACKMAN
3, William CRAMP
4, Stephen and Rose ACKERMAN

World War 1 Connections

From the Mitcham and Tooting Mercury, 7th December 1917

KILLED IN ACTION. – The sad news came to Mr and Mrs Morris, of Walgrave-terrace, Lansdell Road, Mitcham, on Tuesday night, that their son, Ben Morris, had fallen on the Western Front. He was one of the bellringers of the old Parish Church.

Private Benjamin Arthur Morris

The 1891 street directory shows a William MORRIS at no. 14, as does the directory from 1915.


Lance Corporal Frederick James Seach