Tag Archives: 1866

Love Lane

Following the road as it is currently numbered, it starts as a footpath off Church Road along the eastern side of the parish churchyard, and continues to Western Road.

1954 OS map showing the start of Love Lane at Church Road

Eric Montague, in his book, 12 Church Street and Whitford Lane, chapter 6, said that Love Lane almost certainly dated back to the Middle Ages as it served as the access lane to strips of land that stretched north of it. These strips were around a furlong, or 22 yards, in length, and the layouts of roads such as Frimley Gardens and Rodney Road to Fox’s Path, another access lane.

The first house in this lane is numbered as 82A Church Road, after which are houses with even numbers 2, 4 and 6 are on the right in the first part of the footpath, then 8, 10 and 12 are round the corner as the path heads east.

Then there is a block of four houses numbered 14, 16, 18 and 20, that have a datestone identifying it as Laburnum Cottages.

LABURNUM COTTAGES W. F. 1853

This block can be seen on this 1866 OS map:

1866 OS map

After this block the footpath ends, and on the left is a terrace of 6 houses, numbered 1 to 11. This has a name plate in the middle, partially obscured by a drainpipe, which says ‘Hope Terrace’.

Opposite this terrace are houses built around 1983, as planning permission MER170/83 was granted on 21st April 1983. They are numbered with suffixes.

Next to these houses on the right side of Love Lane is a three storey block of 12 flats called Frimley House, which has numbers 22 to 44. Possibly built late 1930s or post-WW2 as the block is not shown on the 1933 OS map.

Opposite Frimley House, and past Hope Terrace, are two pairs of semi-detached houses, numbers 11A and 15, 17 and 19. Next to 19 is number 21, a detached house that is on the corner with Frimley Gardens.

After this the roadway turns right into Church Place but Love Lane continues as a footpath until Edmund Road. On the right can be seen the remains of the entrance to the council depot.

Breeze block filling where entrance to depot was. Photo taken 20th April 2016.

Past Harwood Avenue, the next houses on Love Lane are a pair of semi-detached on the left numbered 23 (Hope Cottage) and 25 (Rose Cottage). This is the only remaining pair of such cottages from those that were built in the early 19th century. The 1896 street directory describes walking from Church Street to Western Road, i.e. in a easterly direction, and the occupants were:

Samuel BEALES (Hope Cottage)
John HUSSEY (Rose Cottage)

23 and 25 Love Lane. Photo taken 21st May 2020

Rose Cottage was the childhood home of William Henry SLATER, who emigrated to Australia in the late 1850s where he was one of the founders of the Mitcham township, now a suburb of Melbourne, Victoria.

This is followed by a terrace of 12 houses, numbered 27 to 49, which has the nameplate in the middle of ‘Douglas Cottages’. These were built in the first decade of the 20th century according to Montague., and were numbered 1 through 12, from west to east. In the 1915 directory Stewart Daniel SLATER, florist, is listed at no. 12.

1954 OS map

After Douglas Cottages is currently a nursery school, built in the early 1960s after a pair of semi-detached cottages, numbered 55 and 57, called Dent’s Cottages, was demolished. The Mitcham News & Mercury had an article in the 2nd September 1960 issue: 132-year old Love Lane cottage to come down.

Further along on the left hand side, after Dearn Gardens, are two detached houses that are set back from the road side at an angle, number 75 and number 77, the latter of which may have been called Glendene when it was occupied by George Victor DEARN, who developed Dearn Gardens.

75 Love Lane with its arched chimney stacks. Photo taken 21st May 2020

Next is a 3-storey block of 6 flats, numbered 79, 81, 83 and 79a, 81a, 83a. After which is a block of 2 houses, 85 and 87, with a third added on, number 89.

Houses numbers 103 to 121 were built in 1934 as part of the Pear Tree Close estate.

An older terrace of 4 houses, numbered 123 to 129, north of the corner with Westfield Road, dated from the 1880s, as are the similar houses on the north side of Westfield Road, according to Montague. The 1910-1911 street directory lists these houses as Knapdale Villas, with these occupants:

1, Frederick NEWSOM
2, Thomas ARTHUR
3, John HINCKLEY

A photo from around 1970 on Merton Memories, incorrectly labelled as Gladstone Road, shows these houses with their original slate roofs.

From Merton Memories, photo reference Mit_Streets_D_LEW_29-2

From the current footpath that leads to the Glebe Path and Queen Anne’s Gardens, on the right hand side of Love Lane northwards, were 6 pairs of semi-detached houses, all demolished by the end of the 20th century and replaced by houses and bungalows.

1910 OS map

From the 1896 street directory the occupants, in houses numbered from 12 down to 1 heading north, were:

12, William Talbot WALLIS
11, Edward WAINWRIGHT
10, Henry DEARN
9, Miss Susan WOOLSEY, dress maker
8, John STEERS
7, Edward FOSTER (Jasmine Cottage)
6, Thomas RYOTT (Ivy Cottage)
5, James CURRELL
4, George James GREGORY
2, Joseph PRIOR
1, Robert Edward SLATER


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

1866 – Six die when bridge collapses during construction of Mitcham – Sutton railway

From the South Eastern Gazette, 1st May, 1866, page 6:

Frightful Accident at Sutton, Surrey — Six Men Killed by the Falling of a Bridge.

— A lamentable catastrophe occurred at Sutton on Saturday afternoon. The South Coast Company are constructing a new line of railway, which is ultimately intended to connect the London termini with Portsmouth by a direct route. A portion of this line is known by the name of the Mitcham and Sutton Railway, and after crossing Mitcham-common runs at the back of Carshalton and joins the existing Epsom line on the London side of the Sutton station.

A deep cutting through chalk, about half a mile from the junction, renders a bridge necessary for the public road. The work was here in active progress, and the bridge which fell was constructed by means of leaving a keystone of the native chalk and building the brick work upon the chalk abutments. The bridge was nearly completed, but some weeks since a doubt of its stability was entertained, and reports are current in the neighbourhood that the bridge was condemned, and that workmen had absolutely been discharged by the contractor for refusing to work at it, under apprehension of danger. Notwithstanding this, on Saturday afternoon, at half-past two, six men and a ganger were employed. Three of the six were cutting away the chalk, and three others were scraping the brickwork to make it ready for pointing, from which it appears that there was no intention of pulling down the bridge. At half-past two the whole mass of brickwork gave way and buried six poor fellows. The ganger, John White, escaped. Every effort to get at the buried men was made, but it was nearly two hours before they were extricated.

All six were of course dead, and there is reason to hope that their death was almost simultaneous with their apprehension of danger. On visiting the spot on Sunday morning we found the six poor fellows were lying on the floor of a cottage adjoining, and exhibiting a frightful aspect of violent deaths. One of them had his face and head absolutely torn in halves horizontally; another’s countenance could scarcely be recognised.

The names of the poor fellows are Edward Berry, Chas. Collard, Wm. Cook, Henry Hyder, and Hutchinson ; the sixth was not identified at the time of our visit. The contractor for the line is Mr. Joseph Firbank, of Newport, Monmouth, and the construction of the bridges is underlet to Mr. Henry King, of Lower Norwood.

Rumbold Villas

Houses from north to south, between Aspen Gardens and Arneys Lane, off the west side of Carshalton Road, south of Mitcham Junction.

They were built in 1923/4, possibly by Joseph Owen. The houses south of Arneys Lane to the junction with Goat Road, were originally called Tramway Terrace, and were built earlier than 1894.

1894 OS map

1894 OS map

1932 OS map

1932 OS map

R.M. Chart valued the completed houses and loans were made by the Mitcham Urban District Council to purchasers under the Small Dwellings Acquisition Act, 1899.

No. Borrower Property Value £ Loan £
2 J. JORDON 750 675
3 P. PERRYMAN 730 500
4 G. MARLOW 730 655
5 F. ALLEN 725 650
6 L. BURKILL 725 600
7 K.T. TODD 730 655
8 J.B. ROWAN 900 800
10 H.L. GOFF 790 710
13 A.F. FERGUS 725 600
14 S.A. STOLLS 725 600
16 V.H. BARMBY 725 650
17 J.R. GASK 740 665
18 E.H. GRUBB 740 615
19 S.K. BUTTON 725 650
20 A. CRIPPEN 725 575
21 R.G. WILKINS 725 600
22 E.H. JENNER 725 650

Source: Volume IX, Mitcham UDC Minutes, Finance and General Purposes Committee, 1924.

Note that JORDON may be a typo, and probably should be JORDAN.

The name possibly came from the nearby Rumbold Farm, as shown on this 1866 OS map.

1866 OS map

1866 OS map

The 1924 electoral registers gives occupants for numbers 12 to 22.

12, Agnes HALE and Thomas Hargrave YATES
13, Alexander Forrester and Caroline Sophia FERGUS
14, Sidney Arthur and Lily STOLLS
15, Sidney Randolph and Grace Kathleen SELF
16, Victor BARNBY
17, John Reginald GASK

19, Sidney Kenneth BUTTON

22, Edmond Frank and Kate JENNER

In the 1925 electoral register, the names Rumbold Villas and Tramway Terrace have been dropped.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.


Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

Tamworth Park

Road that runs between Commonside East, about a fifth of a mile east of the Beehive Bridge, and Tamworth Lane.

The three fields shown in this 1866 OS map, between The Cedars and Tamworth Lodge, is likely to be the plot referred to in the 1873 sale below.

1866 OS map

This building plot of about 9 acres was advertised for sale in an ad in 1873 where it was described that 40 feet of the road had already been laid out.

From the Globe – Saturday 21 June 1873

MITCHAM, Surrey.

— Tamworth-park Estate, about nine acres of valuable Freehold Building Land, immediately fronting Mitcham-common (an open space of 600 to 700 acres extent, which can never be built upon or enclosed). on the high road to Croydon, within 15 minutes’ walk of the Mitcham Junction Station on the South London, Peckham, and Sutton branch of the London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway, whence 43 trains run daily to London-bridge, Victoria. and Waterloo Stations, and within tbo same distance of the Beddington and the Mitcham Stations on the Croydon and Wimbledon line of the London and South-Western Railway. A 40 foot road with footways and sower have been made across the property, so that it is fit for immediate building operations. It contains gravel in abundance, is adorned with handsome elm and other ornamental trees, and is admirably adapted for those seeking sites for superior villa residences in a healthy and highly favoured locality, which can never be over built. Immediate possession on completion of the purchase.

MESSRS. DRIVER have received instructions to SELL by AUCTION, at the MART, Tokenhouse-yard, on TUESDAY. the 1st of July, at Two o’clock precisely, the above valuable BUILDING PROPERTY, in six lots.—Particulars shortly of C. B. Hallward, Esq., solicitor, 5. Mitre-court, Temple; and of Messrs. Driver, Surveyors, Land Agents, and Auctioneers. 4, Whitehall, London, S. W.

This 1894 OS map shows that the road had been started from the Commonside East end, the remaining part being a track to Tamworth Lane. The dotted red lines mark an area that, when measured on a geo-referenced map, measures out an area of around 9 acres.

1894 OS map

On this map there are two houses, and these are listed by name in the 1898 street directory:

(Elmhurst), Col. Allan Graeme RAPER
(Tamworth), George WATT

This 1910 OS map shows the houses that were built on the right hand side of the road at the Commonside East end.

1910 OS map

The 1910-1911 street directory lists the houses from Commonside East and on the left, or north-west side are the named houses Elmhurst and Tamworth, and on the right, or south-east side, there are 26 houses numbered sequentially from 1.

Tamworth park, from Coomon side east.

NORTH-WEST SIDE

(Elmhurst), Mrs UPTON
(Tamworth), Thomas DEVEREUX

SOUTH-EAST SIDE

1, William R. BOON
2, Leonard GREEN
3, Albert John STINTON
4, William ROOK
5, George S. BROWNE
6, Albert William ILES
7, Alfred BERRY
9, Arthur LOTT
10, John SCHOFIELD
11, William ELLIS
12, James George BEVERIDGE
13, Herbert Alfred COPPING
14, Frank PIKE
16, John ROBERTSON
17, John J. HUNT
18, William CHURCH
19, William Henry HALL
20, Albert Edward STEPHENS
22, Albert James McGARLANE
23, William C. CHARLWOOD
24, Alfred BRIGHT

Lamp Post Letter Box

25, James Skinner HEARN
26, Charles R. EVES

Note that numbers 8, 15 and 21 are not listed with an occupant.

In the 1925 street directory the houses have been renumbvered even from 2 to 52.

Tamworth park, from Common side east.

NORTH-WEST SIDE

(Elmhurst), Mrs E.J. UPTON
(Tamworth), Thomas DEVEREUX

SOUTH-EAST SIDE

2, William Richard BOON
4, William Alfred BUTLER
6, Henry BRAKELL
8, William ROOK
10, George Samuel BROWNE
12, William Griffith POWELL
14, Henry William CROUCHER
16, Alfred Ernest GREATOREX
18, Mrs M. LOTT
20, John SCHORFIELD
22, Mrs HUMPHREY
24, James George BEVERIDGE and Clarence S. BEVERIDGE, piano tuner
26, George Edwin MASKELL
28, Charles GRAY
30, William MUNN
32, Andrew C. McKECHNIE
34, Walter Humby TREVETT
36, Edward Henry ANDREWS
38, Herbert TURNER
40, Albert Edward STEPHENS
42, Mrs E. UNDERWOOD
44, Anthony CUMING
46, William HUBBARD
48, Alfred SIMMONS
50, James Skinner HEARN
52, Charles N. STOKES

Eric Montague, in his book Mitcham Histories : 3 Pollards Hill, Commonside East and Lonesome, pages 56-7, said that

the northern end of the road was constructed in the late 1920s by the Tamworth Park Construction Company owned by Joseph Owen. Numbers 25 – 51, on the south-western side of the road, like the houses numbered 263 – 273 Commonside East, are in the contrasting art deco style of the 1930s, which owed much to the inspiration of Continental architects, and was perhaps more suited to the south of France. White cement-rendered walls, bright green-glazed pan-tiled roofs, and large metal-framed windows set them apart from the more traditional architecture of the Home Counties.

The 1927 electoral registers shows even numbered houses from 2 to 74, and the addition of odd houses numbered 53 to 75.

clip from September 1929 photo of south east side of Tamworth Park, no.s 2 to 52. From Mertom Memories, photo reference Mit_Streets_P_Wil_68-1

This 1955 OS map shows number 54 away from the road, behind number 52. I am assuming that this was the site office and yard for the building company, Tamworth Park Construction. Later there were car repair workshops and lock-ups. This was redeveloped as Worthington Close, in around 1988/9.

1955 OS map


People

From the Mitcham Golf Club archives:

Jimmy Hearn (no. 25) was the professional to Prince’s Golf Club of Mitcham for over thirty years. He grew up with J.H. Taylor in Devon. Jimmy’s daughter Vera married Nelson Hambly who succeeded Jimmy as professional to Mitcham Golf Club. Nelson was professional there for c. 20 years.

Note that no. 25 was renumbered to 50, see directories above.

In the Norwood News – Tuesday 9th September 1924, the Childrens Circle, conducted by “DADDY”, published correspondence by Ida Hearn from no. 25.

PRIZE AWARD.

Daddy gives two lovely books as prizes every week for the best poetry sent in. The prizes this week go to:—

IDA HEARN,
25, Tamworth-park, Mitcham.

ERNEST DEATH,
“Oakhurst,” Graham-avenue, Mitcham.

AN INTERESTING LETTER.

Dear Daddy,

— I have been very interested in the Children’s Circle. and I thought I should like to become one of your members. I am sending you In a piece of poetry, a riddle, and a joke, which I hope you will see fit to publish, I attend Upper Mitcham Girls’ School. Wishing the Circle the best of luck, Your loving daughter, IDA HEARN. 25, Tamworth-park, Mitcham, Surrey.

POETRY

THE GIRL WORTH WHILE

‘Tis easy enough to be pleasant,
When life flows along like a song,
But the girl worth while is the girl who will smile,
When everything goes dead wrong,
For the test of the heart is trouble,
And it always comes with the years,
And the smile that is worth the promise of earth
Is the smile that comes through tears.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Rock Terrace

A terrace of houses built near the crossroads of two field paths. One path went from the parish church, north-westerly across the fields; the other ran east to west along Fox’s Path.

This OS map of 1866 shows where these two paths met, and, while Rock Terrace is not actually named, the buildings outlined in red may well be it.

Later, the terrace was extended and the road was named Belgrave Road, with the path leading to the church being called Belgrave Walk.

Earliest reference found so far in the newspaper archives is for an auction of 9 houses in Rock Terrace.

Freehold ground-rent of £21 per annum, arising from nine houses in Rock-terrace, Mitcham — £115.

Source: Morning Advertiser – Wednesday 29 August 1866 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

This 1910 map shows the outline of houses in Belgrave Road. Given that Batsworth Road was laid on the original path from Fox’s Path, then the 9 houses referred to in the auction may well have been the whole terrace.

News Stories

1922 Rock Terrace Recreation Ground

A major event was the Explosion of 1933.

King George V Silver Jubilee Celebrations in 1935

Note that Lady Worsfold, residing at Hall Place when this photo was taken, moved to the White House at the cricket green the following year when her husband, T. Cato worsfold, died.

Rock Terrace and Queen Street (sic), Mitcham, Jubilee Tea. From Mitcham News & Mercury, 31st May, 1935.

Rock Terrace and Queen Street (sic), Mitcham, Jubilee Tea. From Mitcham News & Mercury, 31st May, 1935.


Merton Memories Photos

Church Class

Off to the Races – this photo was reproduced in Eric Montague’s Mitcham Histories: 8 Phipps bridge, on page 113 with the caption that it was around 1910.

Arney’s Lane

Road without houses that leads off the west side of Carshalton Road, south of Drake Road and north of The Goat Inn at Beddington Corner. It divides the terraces of houses in Carshalton Road between numbers 23 on the north side and number 24 on the south side. Numbers 124 to 53 Carshalton Road was originally called Tramway Terrace.

This 1866 OS map shows an unnamed lane leading to Willow Cottage.

1866 OS map

The 1894 OS map shows the road named as Arney’s Lane, leading to willow Lodge. The name refers to the gelatine makers Arney & Company, and the lane lead to where Gerard Arney lived, according to Eric Montague.

1894 OS map

The road is, in 2020, an unmade, private road used for parking by residents of nearby houses. It leads to the footpath at the back of the houses that is shown on earlier maps as Tramway Path.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.