Tag Archives: Nags Head

1880 : Gas Workmen’s Outing

Croydon Guardian and Surrey County Gazette – Saturday 25 September 1880

MITCHAM.
Workmen’s Excursion.

— A party of tradesmen and other inhabitants of Mitcham, accompanied by Mr. William Jones, foreman of the Mitcham gasworks, left the “Nag’s Head,” Mitcham, on Tuesday morning, at 8.30, on an excursion to Kingswood, accompanied by a band, who played a variety of lively airs on the way.

The first stop was made the “Red Lion,” Kingswood, and from thence to Walton-on-the-hill. An unfortunate accident occurred here. As one of the musicians was ascending the steps of house he missed his footing, and was precipitated to the ground, where he lay for some time senseless. As soon the man was sufficiently recovered, the party entered the dining-hall of one of the chief public-houses in the place, where sumptuous repast had been prepared by the host.

After dinner the usual loyal toasts were proposed by Messrs. Rough, Baker, Wigmore, and others. Having spent some further time in the rural scenery of the surrounding neighbourhood, the party proceeded home, having spent a thoroughly enjoyable day.

1932 Death of Mrs Poluski

From the Norwood News – Friday 29 January 1932, from the British Newspaper Archive, which requires a subscription.

A FAMOUS VARIETY STAR

Death of Mrs. Will Poluski

HER KINDNESS TO ALL

Mitcham has lost a famous resident by the death of Mrs. Harriet Poluski, widow of the late Mr. Will Poluski, one of the famous Poluski Brothers, comedians. Mrs. Poluski lived with her son, Mr. Sam Poluski, manager of the Three Kings Hotel, Mitcham Common, Mrs. Poluski being the licensee.

She had been ill for some time, and on Monday week went into Wilson Hospital for an operation. This was supposed to have been successful, and Mrs. Poluski was expected to get well again. It came as a great shock to her relatives when she suddenly collapsed and died on Friday morning. Her age was 72. — While living at Mitcham Mrs. Poluski had endeared herself to a large circle of friends. She was a very affable lady, and, in the words of a friend, was a “dear old soul.” Everybody who knew her spoke highly of her wonderful traits of sympathy, generosity and optimism. Her death will be mourned generally, and particularly by her local acquaintances, to many of whom she was a fairy godmother.

STAR OF FORMER DAYS.

As Nettie Waite, comedienne, Mrs. Poluski was well known on the variety stage more than thirty years ago — a star of former days.

She and her husband had been married nearly fifty years when Mr. Poluski died, about eight years ago. This was two years after the death of his partner-brother, Sam, had brought to a close a famous musical hall partnership lasting nearly half-a-century.

Mrs. Poluski leaves one son, Mr. Sam Poluski, of the Three Kings, and two daughters. Her other son, Mr. Will Poluski, jun., who was Miss Rosie Lloyd’s husband, died about two years ago while on a stage tour in South Africa. His death, following closely on that of his father, was a big blow to the mother.

The two daughters, who are well known in the stage world, are Miss Winifred Ward, the comedienne, and Mrs. Lottie McNaughton, wife of Mr. Gus McNaughton, the talented comedian.

Mrs. Poluski’a grand-daughter — Miss Winifred Ward’s daughter — is Miss Polly Ward, who for a time was one of the “Trix Sisters,” and who also appeared with the Co-optimists.

THE FUNERAL.

The funeral of Mrs. Poluski took place on Tuesday at Lambeth Cemetery, Tooting, her remains being laid to rest in the same grave as that of her husband.

The Rev. W. K. Roberts, Vicar of St Mark’s, Mitcham, conducted the services both at the Three Kings and the graveside.

Handsome wreaths were sent by the following: Sam, Winnie and Lottie (son and daughters); Jack, Bino, and Lottie (grandchildren); Gus, Ted and Bob (sons-in-law); Rosie Lloyd (daughter-in-law)l Sam F. Poluski (nephew); Gertie (niece); Mrs George Le Clerq, Brother George and family. Sister Emmie and Niece Em???y. Misses Rose and Peggy Hamilton, Mollie Melvin. A.F. Page, Mr and Mrs Peat, Mr and Mrs Townsend and family; Croydon District Licensed Victuallers’ Association. Bee Low, E.J. Eidman and family, The Plough (Sutton). Mrs Brown (Beehive). Mr and Mrs Percy Goodyer, Mr and Mrs Tyler and family. Mr and Mrs Harry Lovatt, Mr and Mrs Singfield Mitcham Conservative Club; Arthur and Mabel Le Clerq.

A few friends, Cecil, Jack, and E Rubber. Mr and Mrs Jones (King’s Arms, Mitcham). Mrs Godfrey and family (Nags Head). Mr and Mrs J.W. Moore and Lorna. Mrs James, W. Payne, Binnie and Leo Boys of the Brighton Cruising Club. Major and Mrs Poole (Buck’s Head, Mitcham). Brothers of the Order of Druids; Fred Griffiths and family; Staff of the Three Kings; Mr Keith B. Harris, Lloyd family, Mrs S. Hartley and Doris; boys of the Three Kings public bar; Miss Clare Romaine. H.E. and S.F. Fowkes. Mr and Mrs W. Laing. Mrs and Mrs Donn. Ruby (Three Kings). Mr and Mrs Brown (florist). Mr and Percy Mayhew; Hengler family. Kathleen Blunden. Mr and Mrs T. Witherden. Mr and Mrs Batchelor; Mitcham Athletic Club. Mrs J. Boxall, Bob and Jennie Leonard, etc.

Messrs W.P. Mellhuish and Sons, Mitcham and Tooting, were the undertakers.

1847 Pub Licensing

Saturday. -€” (Before Sir H.. Bridges, Chairman, S. H. Lucas, W. A. Wilkinson, and T. Byron, Esqrs.)

This being the annual licensing day, the court was much crowded, considerable anxiety being felt to the result of the applications for new licenses. The police from the various districts were present, order of the Bench, to afford information as to the manner in which the various public-houses had been conducted during the past year.

The number of public-houses in this district are follows-€”
Parish of Croydon 45,
Carshalton 5,
Coulsdon 3,
Addington 1,
Beddington 1,
Mitcham 14,
Morden 2,
Penge 2,
Wallington 3.

The evidence of the police being of a satisfactory nature, the whole of the old licenses were renewed.

The license of the Windmill, Croydon-common, was transferred from Mr. Hierons to Mr. Jas. Cross; the Jolly Sailor, Norwood, from Mrs. Eaton to Mr. T. Pascall.

Application for Wine and Spirit Licenses.

– €”The first application was from Mr, John Watts, of the Castle, Gibbet-green. Mr. Childs, of the firm of Wire and Childs, solicitors, appeared in support of the application. he said that since he had been in court, he understood that an application for a license for a neighbouring house had been withdrawn, but that this application was to opposed.

Mr. Richards said he appeared on behalf of Mr. Strong, owner of the Red Deer beer-house, to oppose application.

Mr. Childs then stated his case at considerable length. This was the tenth application for license to this house. It was the third time Mr. Watts had applied he had kept the house three years a beer-house without the slightest complaint being alleged against him.

The memorial which had been presented to the magistrates bore the signatures many of the oldest and most respectable inhabitants of the neighbourhood. The premises are well built and commodious, and under all circumstances he prayed that the license might be granted.

Mr. Richards said he was not instructed to oppose this on pecuniary grounds, but Mr. Strong considered the time had not yet arrived when a public-house was required in this neighbourhood, he therefore withdrew his own application. The Castle was well enough for a beer house for wagoners to stop at, but would never attract the custom of respectable persons.

Mr. Childs ridiculed the idea of Mr. Strong being considered the guardian of the public interest in this neighbourhood. It was only two years ago that a license was applied for, for his own property, within quarter of a mile of the Castle. As to the respectability the premises, his clients were not ambitious ; they did not expect the patronage of the nobility and gentry tradesmen and even wagoners would do for them.

Mr. Raper applied for a license for a house at the Beulah Spa, Norwood. Mr. Childs, for the applicant, stated that the house was a boarding-house, and all the license was required for, was to accommodate the persons residing in the house. It was not intended to make it a general public-house.

Mr. Richards opposed it on behalf the inhabitants of Norwood, and presented a strongly signed memorial, which stated that in the opinion of the memorialists no such license was required.

Henry Gillingham applied for a licence. His house is situated on Westow-hill, Norwood. An opposing petition was put by Hugh Bowditch, of the Woodman public-house, Norwood; also one the same effect, from John Ledger, of the White Hart, Norwood. Applicant said it was twenty years since a licence had been granted to that part of Norwood, during which time, the inhabitants had nearly doubled ; he had many applications for spirits, but dare not sell them.

Mr. Wilkinson – €”Then you mean that persons come to your house to enjoy the fine prospect; the view makes them thirsty, and you cannot supply them with drink ? – €”Yes, sir.

Henry Henden applied for license for a beer-house known as the Prince of Wales, Merton-lane. Mr. Childs appeared for the applicant. He said there were several factories in the neighbourhood; the nearest public-house was the Victory, which is 745 yards distant; the next the Nag’€™s Head, 1200 yards. The persons engaged in the factories presented a petition supporting the application. The landlord of the Victory opposed the application. Mr. Wood, the brewer, he said, had built the house in opposition to him. The neighbourhood was anything but improving. Mr. Lowman, the Nag’€™s Head, and Mr. Gale, of the Red Lion, also opposed the application. The printers at the factories had not more than two days’ work a week throughout the winter.

Benjamin Marchant, of Tamworth-lane, in the parish of Mitcham, applied for a license. Mr. Child appeared for the applicant, and Mr. J. Drummond in opposition.

The house is situate in the lane opposite the work-house, at Mitcham-common. The clergyman at Mitcham had signed the petition for the application, which Mr. Childs considered to great and convincing fact.

A plan was put in, and Mr. Chart, of Mitcham, called to prove the signatures to the memorial. In cross-examination, he said many of the witnesses were not rate-payers, also that, the house was not in the high road. Witness afforded much amusement by his apparent determination to make out case, Mr. Drummond remarking that he was a famous hand at evading questions; he only wished he was as good at answering them.

Mr. Watney, in opposition, deposed that most of the signatures the memorial were those of working men.

Mr. Wilkinson – I should apprehend they are persons most likely to require it.

The Three Kings, Mitcham. – €”A case was then gone into, whether a license should be granted to this house. Mr. Hancock, who had kept it for 30 years, applied to have the license renewed in his name. A person named King also applied, saying he was the proper tenant. Hancock had a lease, which expired in December, 1846, but he refused to give up possession, and had been turned out. The Bench refused to grant the license to either party.

The Court was then cleared for the Bench to deliberate. After a quarter of an hour was again opened, when the Chairman announced that license would granted to John Watts, of the Castle, Gibbet-green, as will seen an advertisement in another part of this paper, and that the other applications were refused.

Source: South Eastern Gazette – Tuesday 09 March 1847 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

According to Montague in his book Mitcham Histories : 3 Pollards Hill, Commonside East and Lonesome, page 97, in the 1840s Benjamin Marchant was the occupier of The Phoenix, which was renamed the Horse and Groom in 1855.

1847 Blue Houses Auction

Source : THE DAILY NEWS, WEDNESDAY, MAY 5, 1847

Mitcham, Surrey.

Valuable copyhold estates

MESSRS. BLAKE will SELL by AUCTION, at Garraway’s Coffee-house, Change-alley, on TUESDAY, May 25, at Twelve o’clock, in lots, comprising the OLD NAG’S HEAD INN, with extensive premises in the rear, situate at Upper Mitcham Green, held be Mr. William Loman, under a repairing lease, of which 17 1/4 years will be unexpired at Midsummer next, at the inadequate rent of £90 per annum (a premium having been paid on the granting of the lease), and forming a valuable investment for brewers or wine and spirit merchants; also, NINE HOUSES, with gardens and grounds, situate on Mitcham Common, at the junction of the roads leading to Croydon and Carshalton, known as the “Blue Houses,” in the occupation of various tenants, producing about £118 per annum.

Particulars, with plans, will be issued ten days before the sale, and may be had at the inns in the neighbourhood; at Garraway’s Coffee-house; the Artichoke Inn, Newington Causeway; of Messrs. Everest, White, Hanslip, and Manning, Solicitors, Epsom, and 12, Hatton-garden; of Mr. Robert Russell, Solicitor, 23, Martin’s-lane, Cannon-street and Croydon; and Messrs. Blake, Croydon.

18470505 Nags Head and Blue Houses Auction