Tag Archives: White Hart

1939 : All Women Cricket Match

From the Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Friday 28 July 1939 via the British Newspaper Archives, which requires a subscription.

WOMEN CRICKETERS ON MITCHAM GREEN

An all-women cricket match was played on Mitcham Green, on Wednesday, for the benefit of the Mitcham Cricket Club funds. The teams were Surrey v. Herts, and District. Surrey won the game easily. Their innings was notable for a fine batting display bv Miss Molly Hide, who retired after scoring 54 runs. Miss W. Lambert was the second highest scorer, with 27. Miss M. MacLagan, the captain, contributed ten in a total of 137. Herts, scored 57.

The early part of the day was gloomy and comparatively few spectators were present. In the evening about two thousand people ringed the green. They were generous with their applause of the performances and they thoroughly enjoyed the game, which was played in first-class style and in the best sporting spirit.

Lunch was eaten at the White Hart Hotel, where the visitors were welcomed by Mr. Jack Pillinger on behalf of Mitcham Cricket Club, Mr Charles Sanders and Mrs. Sciaretta were other members of the club present. A spray of Mitcham lavender, the gift of Mr. Tom Francis, and a copy of the Mitcham Club handbook were presented to each player. The umpires were Mrs. Tabor and Mr. H. Thompson. An excellent pitch, a bit sticky at the beginning of the game, was prepared by Groundsman Tom Sturtivant.

White Hart owner

The freehold for the Grade II listed White Hart pub at 350 London Road, Mitcham, CR4 3ND, is title SGL510698, according to the Land Registry. Associated with this is the land at the rear of the pub which is title SGL413207. This consists of the access road from Broadway Gardens, the car park and garden at the back of the pub.

In 1994, parts of the land at the rear were sold by Bass (the brewery owner at the time) to Wandle Holdings plc. This is the housing association that owns Highfield Court, the block of flats next door.

These two titles (SGL510698 and SGL413207) were sold together for £1,500,000 on 16th October 2015 by Punch Partnerships to MENDOZA LTD (incorporated in Isle of Man) of 2a Lord Street, Douglas, Isle of Man, IM1 2BD.

The two titles were sold again for £1,500,000 on 21st December 2016 to ASSOCIATE PROPERTIES LTD (incorporated in Isle of Man) of 2a Lord Street, Douglas, Isle of Man, IM1 2BD.

The two titles were sold again for £1,500,000 on 6th March 2017 to GATEWAY REALTY LTD (incorporated in Isle of Man) of First Floor, 18-20 North Quay, Douglas, Isle Of Man, IM1 4LE.

On 14th July 2017 a charge contained in a debenture was registered against both titles by SANNE FIDUCIARY SERVICES LIMITED (incorporated in Jersey) of 13 Castle Street, St Helier, Jersey, JE4 5UT.

Their website gives contact details for their London office at 21 Palmer Street, London SW1H 0AD (telephone 020 3327 9720, fax 020 7222 5151). Their email address is info@sannegroup.com

The Isle of Man companies house website for GATEWAY REALTY Ltd shows a different address than that on the titles, but there was a change of registered address filed on 26th June 2017. The website doesn’t give contact details for GATEWAY REALTY Ltd, but it does name the company’s agents as ANDCO CORPORATE SERVICES Ltd. Their website gives contact details: telephone 01624 623731 and email info@andco.im

The pub is currently (May 2019) offered to rent at £26,000 per year, see Jenkins Law website (pdf).

1961 : Publicans welcome new betting laws

Publicans welcome the new laws

MITCHAM publicans welcome the new betting and gaming laws allowing small bets to be placed on bar games.

But some point out that it merely makes legal something that OH been going on for years.

Licensee of the Red Lion, Colliers Wood, Mr. Frank Clements, said this week: “I am all for it. We will now be able to organise whist drives and housey-housey for money.

“What I do think is ridiculous is that you can’t place a bet on a horse in the bar. To do that you have to go outside.”

Licensee of the Beehive, Commonside East, Mitcham, Mr. A. Pays, said it would clear up a lot of underhand practices.

Mr. William Lewis of the White Hart thinks it will make little difference to his customers. “What I am against,” he said “are the one arm bandits (slot machines).”

source: Mitcham News & Mercury, 6th January, 1961, page 1.

Aeronaut becomes licensee of White Hart

Derby Daily Telegraph – Monday 22 September 1890

THE MAGISTRATE AND THE AERONAUT.

Mr. William John Harris, the present occupier, sought to have the license of the White Hart hotel, Upper-green, Mitcham, transferred from himself to Capt. William Dale, the well-known aeronaut. The chairman asked the incoming tenant whether it was his intention to give exhibitions of ballooning at the house.

Captain Dale : No, sir.
Dr. Carpenter: Because it stands to reason that when you are up in the air you cannot be attending to your business.
Captain Dale : No, sir.
Dr. Carpenter : Then the license will be transferred to you on condition that you will not practise ballooning there, whatever you may do elsewhere.

The transfer was effected.

Note: it is not known whether he was related to the Dale family in Mitcham that ran various pubs.

1876 White Hart After Hours Card Game Busted

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 06 May 1876

MITCHAM.

Guests at the White Hart.

At the Petty Sessions, on Saturday, Benjamin Gay, landlord of the White Hart, Mitcham, was summoned for having his house open at prohibited hours; and Albert Lowe, gentleman, of Baron-grove, Mitcham, James Bridger, gentleman, Manor House, Mitcham, and Charles Bidder, gentleman, of Sutton road, Mitcham, were summoned for being on the said premises, on the 22nd April.

—P.-c, Nelson (186 W) stated that on the 21st April be had orders to keep observation on the White Hart Hotel. About twenty minutes to 12 on the night in question saw a gentleman enter the house. About hour later saw a light, and heard voices in the front room upstairs, the conversation being respecting a game of cards, he heard one person say, “I know he played the king.”

—Police-sergeant Henry Foster (29 W) stated that he went to the White Hart Hotel about two o’’clock, and asked the landlord who he had upstairs. Mr. Gay said he had some lodgers. Witness said he desired to inspect the house, and going upstairs he found the three defendants, Bridger, Bidder, and Lowe, seated round a table, playing cards. There were two champagne bottles, four glasses, and some cigars before them. Witness asked, for their names and addresses, which they gave him, but Mr. Bridger gave the name of Thompson. On asking Mr. Gay why had the other defendants there at that time, said, “I am going away, and I entertaining these gentlemen guests,” The other defendants said that was quite correct. About twenty minutes to three witness met the defendants Lowe and Bidder in Baron-grove, about thirty yards from the White Hart, going in the direction of their homes. They said nothing then. Witness reported the case, and they were summoned.

—Police sergt. Wells (4 W) corroborated the evidence given by the previous witnesses.

—Mr. Gay said all the gentlemen were playing at billiards, and as he had disposed of his business and was soon going away, he said he should like to stand a glass of champagne. They did have some champagne and smoked a cigar or two.

—The magistrates ordered Mr. Gay to pay a fine of 40s. and 9s. costs, and produce his license before them Monday morning. Lowe, Bidder, and Bridger were each ordered to pay a fine of 20s. and 9s. costs.

How Coal Gas is Made

From
Mitcham News & Mercury
12th May, 1933

“The Manufacture of Gas” was the subject of a very interesting address given, at the weekly meeting of the Rotary Club of Mitcham, held on Monday at the “White Hart” Hotel, Mitcham.

The speaker, was Rotarian Edward Pellew-Harvey, of the Wandsworth and District Gas Co., and a member of the Mitcham Club, and he explained that the art of coal gas manufacture is considerably over a century old.

After dealing with the history of the production of coal he said that at the present time In the United Kingdom alone there are some 1,700 separate concerns promoted for the manufacture a gas. Of these 931 are operated under statutory powers, some 619 being owned by companies and 313 by local authorities. The capital employed by the statutory concerns is approximately £140,000,000. The total annual production of gas in the United Kingdom is approximately 300,000,000,000 cubic feet, which is distributed to 8,000,000 individual consumers through 40,000 miles of street mains.

MITCHAM’S RETORTS.

The following is briefly, he added, the process of gas making. The coal is placed in numerous hermetically sealed fire clay or silica containers called retorts which are heated to a temperature of approximately 2,000 degrees F. by a mixture of furnace gas and air, which circulates round the retorts. There is practically no limit to the number of retorts used. At the Mitcham Works there are 192 working continually, each retort containing 12 cwt of coal, which remains in the retort for 12 hours, after which all the gas has been extracted from the coal, and approximately 9 cwt of coke left. Another charge is placed in the retort, which again remain for a period of 12 hours. From the foregoing figures it will be seen that at the Mitcham Works approximately 200 tons of coal per day are used for gas production.

Subsequently the gas is drawn away by means of a rotary pump, called an exhauster, through a series of condensers, which cool the gas to atmospheric temperature, and in so doing a portion of tar is recovered in the form of the dark thick liquid which is well known. From the condensers the gas travels through a series of cast iron or
steel rectangular vessels known as scrubbers, where, by washing, the ammonia is released, the final liquid, consisting of water and ammonia, being termed ammoniacal liquor.

A POISONOUS GAS.

From the scrubbers the gas passes through a series of cast iron boxes filled with oxide of iron, or ferric oxide, which extracts the sulphurated hydrogen. This gas being a poisonous one, has by law to be totally eliminated from the finished gas. The gas cleaned and purified, is now ready for use by the consumer, and is then metered and stored in the gas holder until required.

One ton of coal carbonised at a gas works yields coal gas, and the following main by-products, which in turn yield many valuable constituents. By distilling chemically the various oils contained in crude coal tar the following products are obtained: Dyes, perfumes and essences, explosives, chemicals used in medicine and surgery, such as anaesthetics, antiseptics and disinfectants; aperients, laxatives and emetics; photographic chemicals; wood preservatives, benzol, etc.

The cost of soot to the nation is tremendous. Manchester’s laundry bill, for instance, is £290,000 a year more than it would be if the air were clean. During heavy fogs, intensified by smoke, traffic is disorganised; in 27 days of fog during recent rears the ‘buses lost 400,000 working miles. But the damage which is most obvious to the general public is that done to our buildings. Soot and acid in the air involve the country in an expenditure of about £120,000 a year on the repair of Government buildings alone. It Is estimated that in London the financial loss due to smoke is nearly £7,000,000 a year.

Britain’s brightest days in recent years continued the speaker, were during the coal strike of 1926, when the air became clearer and purer than it has been observed within living memory. The fact is worth recalling, for today of the 33,000,000 tons of coal burned in Britain every year for domestic purposes about 3,200,000 tons pollute the air in the form of smoke and soot.

Smoke and soot are easily preventable, and the responsibility for polluting the air lies with each citizen. By taking advantage of the use of a smokeless fuel we can individually set a example, and to that extent give the sun a sporting chance of transmitting to us its health-giving rays. It is now a well-established fact that the ultra-violet rays of the sun, which are essential to our well-being, are shut up by the smoke clouds which hover continually over our big cities. On every square mile of our large towns there is a continuous soot fall, amounting in some cases to an annual deposit of hundreds of tons.

EMPLOYMENT GIVEN.

The magnitude of the industry may be judged by the following figures:

113,000 people are regularly employed in the gas industry;
the capital invested in the industry is about £200,000,000.
18,000,000 tons of coal are carbonised annually in British gas works;
the production of this coal gives employment to about 67,000 mine workers;
10,000,000 consumers regularly use some 1,000 million therms of gas a year;
50,000 miles of mains carry this fuel unfailingly to them;
7,000,000 British housewives cook by gas;
three out of every four doctors all over the country use gas fires;
four out of every five nursing homes and three out of
every four hospitals use gas for heating;
altogether the medical profession accounts for about 100,000 gas fires;
3,000 trades use gas for an average of seven processes in each;
the by-products obtained yearly from British gas works include 12,000,000 tons of coke, 120,000 tons of sulphate of ammonia, 215 million gallons of tar.

The speaker concluded by inviting the members of the club to visit the gas works at Mitcham on May 27.

Rotarian C. H. Parslow tendered thanks to the speaker for his excellent address and on behalf of the club accepted his kind invitation to visit the works of the gas company. Rotarian Riley Schofield presided, in the absence of the president, Rotarian Isaac H. Wilson, who was attending the Rotary Conference at Scarborough in company with the two vice-presidents, Rotarians Gauntlett and Cole.

The chairman welcomed guests from Wallington and Croydon Clubs.

Mitcham Brewery

Edgar and John Mantell operated the Mitcham Brewery, London Rood, Mitcham, Surrey, until 1877 when it was taken over by John Dalton Mantell, followed by Thunder & Little in 1884. Thunder & Little Ltd was registered in September 1895 as a limited liability company to acquire the business. The company acquired Edward Boniface, Cheam Brewery, Cheam Surrey, in 1898 and changed its name to Mitcham & Cheam Brewery Co Ltd. It was taken over by Page & Overton’s Brewery Ltd, Croydon, Surrey, in 1917. The Cheam Brewery closed in that year and the Mitcham Brewery ceased brewing in 1914.

Source: The Brewing Industry: A Guide to Historical Records edited by Lesley Richmond. Published by Manchester University Press (6 Sept. 1990). ISBN-10: 0719030323

Francis Thunder is shown in the 1900 electoral registers.


Merton Memories Photos
1882 White Hart pub showing JD Mantell name

This sketch from around 1885, when zoomed in to the White Hart pub, the brewery ‘Thunder & Little’ can be seen.
1885 cricket on the green1950s

c. 1975

Maps
1866
1888
1894
1913
1932
1938
1953

News Articles

1898 Mitcham and Cheam Brewery formed to takeover Thunder and Little

18981213 Mitcham and Cheam Brewery

London Standard – Tuesday 13 December 1898

The Mitcham and Cheam Brewery Company (Limited) is formed to take over and combine the businesses of Thunder and Little and of Edward Boniface, brewers, the one at Mitcham and the other at Cheam. A Share capital of £50,000 is to be created, in £5 Shares, half of which will be Cumulative Preference Shares, and the whole of it goes to the Vendors, who also accept £40,000 in cash in payment. An issue of £50,000 in Four-and-a-Half per Cent. First Mortgage Debenture Stock is offered to the public at par in multiples of £10.


News Articles

A subscription is required to view these articles on the British Newspaper Archives website.

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 20 July 1889

Messrs. Thunder and Little’s Beanfeast.

— On Saturday last about 40 of the employees of the Mitcham Brewery assembled at 7 a.m., and after partaking of what they chose in the way of liquid refreshment, proceeded to Mitcham Junction, whence they travelled by special train to Portsmouth, arriving there about 11.45. After a hearty lunch at Maybour’s Restaurant at Portsea the dockyards were visited. A steam yacht was then chartered, and the party went for a two and a half hours’ trip skirting the Isle of Wight. Returning to Maybour’s they sat down to most excellent dinner, the expense of which, indeed was the whole of the outing, being borne by the firm. “The first-class spread” having been done ample justice to, toasts, songs, etc., followed until time for the return journey at 7p.m. Arriving at Mitcham Junction in good time, the company adjourned to the White Hart Hotel, and there brought most enjoyable day of pleasure to a harmonious finish.


Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 01 November 1879

Extensive Embezzlement.

—At the Croydon Petty Sessions on Saturday last, Frederick French, of Aberdeen-terrace, Mitcham, was charged, on remand, with embezzling 18s. 6d., the moneys of his employer, Mr. J. D. Mantell, brewer, of Mitcham.

—The defendant pleaded guilty, and said he hoped the Bench would be lenient with him on account of his wife and family.

— Mr. Dennis, who represented the prosecutor, said the defendant should have thought of his wife and family before. It unfortunately happened that this was only one amount of prisoner’s defalcations out of between £30 and £40.—The Bench sent prisoner to gaol for four calendar months.