Tag Archives: 1897

Suffragette Stories

From the collection of Suffragette articles on the British Newspaper Archives, where Mitcham is mentioned.

If more evidence were necessary in support of the Public Places (Order) Bill, it could be supplied by the case of a Mitcham woman, Mrs. Brennar, who was recently arrested for ” insulting behaviour ” and locked in a cell at Bow Street.

Mrs. Brennar, to avoid the peril of standing still in a bitter wind and freezing temperature actually dared to ” walk up and down,” while waiting in the Strand to meet her husband! This seems to have been enough to convince the police that she was a woman of loose morals and she was taken into custody.

In spite of her protests she was not discharged until brought before a magistrate.

Source: Common Cause – Friday 27 March 1931 from the British Newspaper Archive

More Women County Councillors.

Two more women have been elected as members of County Councils, bringing the number of women serving on County Councils to 148. Mrs. Chuter Ede, who has just been returned to the Surrey Council, by a majority of 422, was the nominee of the undivided Labour party. Her opponent was the former chairman of the Urban District Council. She is the first woman to represent the Mitcham Division, and the fifth on the Council. The Duchess of Richmond and Gordon has succeeded Colonel Hankey on the West Sussex Council, and is the fourth woman to be returned to this Authority.

Source: Common Cause – Friday 07 December 1928 from the British Newspaper Archive

A reception is being given at Mitcham Hall, Surrey, on September 30th, by Miss Millington and Miss Hurlston, to meet Mrs. Bedford Fenwick, and to welcome home the nurses who served in the Greco-Turkish war.

Source: Woman’s Signal – Thursday 30 September 1897 from the British Newspaper Archive

A subscription is required to access these articles on the BNA.

Queen Anne’s Bounty

To help with the income of poor clergy, the Queen Anne’s Bounty was a sum of money used to buy land. This land was then rented out and this rental income was used to support the clergy.

In 1734, £200 of this Royal Bounty was used to buy an area of land from Charles Dubois in Mitcham, to support the vicar at the parish church.

Source: An Account of the Augmentation of Small Livings by “The Governors of the Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of the Maintenance of the poor Clergy” published in 1856, by Christoper Hodgson, M.A.

Source: An Account of the Augmentation of Small Livings by “The Governors of the Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of the Maintenance of the poor Clergy” published in 1856, by Christoper Hodgson, M.A.

Eric Montague, in his Mitcham Histories : 12 Church Street and Whitford Lane, page 107, said that more land was bought in 1762 from Mary Gellibrand.

This OS map of 1867 shows areas marked as ‘Glebe’. Note that the London Road was, as shown on this map, known as Whitford Lane.

1867 OS map

1867 OS map

Later, parts of this land was sold off to developers to build houses. Montague, page 108, ibid., said that in 1790 a substantial plot was sold to build a house which became Glebelands.

In the Land Registry title for a house in Preshaw Crescent for example, a conveyance was made in 1897:

A Conveyance of the land in this title and other land dated 2 September 1897 made between (1) The Reverend Frederick Wilson Clerk (the Incumbent) (2) The Governors of The Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of The Maintenance of The Poor Clergy (the Governors) (3) The Right Reverend Father in God Edward Stuart (the Ordinary) (4) Francis Charles Simpson (the Patron) (5) The Right Honourable and Most Reverend Frederick By Divine Providence Lord Archbishop of Canterbury (the Archbishop) and (6) Richard Arthur Bush (the Purchaser) contains covenants details of which are set out in the schedule of restrictive covenants hereto.

See also Queen Anne’s Bounty on wikipedia.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.